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It's a toilet not a restroom, get over yourselves! ...and other annoying Americanisms

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posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand


Ummm...ouch...I've been on jobs like that...I've had this reoccurring dream of falling into a full septic tank...and definitely NOT coming out smelling like roses...

Thank you for the thread BTW...this has been too much fun...and a welcome break...



YouSir
edit on 28-2-2016 by YouSir because: Ummm...I forget...




posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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Please don't tell us your are the one that created the "Sittin' on a toliet" video.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: grainofsand
....when was the last time you saw a bath in a public toilet?


Ironically, it was in the British Virgin Islands. West End to be exact.


did you graduate from the school of savagry? ouch.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: JourneymanWelder

Sorry, not following what you are asking. What do you mean?



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: and14263

Come now, let's not turn this sensible discussion into a poop flinging contest, why would I crap in the cistern ? And why is using the sink to wash my derriere bad ? A sink is used for washing parts of the body no ? There's no written code of ethics that a sink should only be used for cleaning the top half of your body is there ?


What is that old saying about a dirty house

You cannot pee in the sink for the dirty dishes



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 04:42 PM
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Lol, all this talk of bathrooms and my gas water boiler has finally died so I just washed in the bath with one of my plastering buckets filled with hot water from the stove and kettle. No way am I calling a plumbing/gas engineer out on a Sunday night and paying through the nose.

...I guess that makes it my bucket room now



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 04:51 PM
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Probally because all the damn signs say "Restroom" here in America in public places that is.a reply to: grainofsand



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: openyourmind1262
Probally because all the damn signs say "Restroom" here in America in public places that is.a reply to: grainofsand

What?! The signs say 'Restroom', honestly?
They say 'Toilets' in every public place I frequent here in the UK (malls/motorway services/council provided toilets etc)
Most pubs have a 'Toilets' sign but usually 'Gentlemen' and 'Ladies' above the appropriate door.

...restroom lmfao!

*Edit*
I've #ed it now I guess, 'Gentlemen' & 'Ladies' how sexist and discriminatory is that!!!
...that's the signs in pubs where I live though, I wonder how long it will be before someone challenges them on gender legislation lol
edit on 28.2.2016 by grainofsand because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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When I'm in polite company I always refer to it as the scheissenhausen.

So much more discreet than just coming out with it in English. Refined people appreciate that.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: berenike

I always thought it was scheissenhaus...but then I only learned Welsh, English, and a bit of French.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand


Only read a couple of pages so far, but man, I had to thank you for this thread and all the laughs! I really needed that!

And why do you people call an operating room in a hospital the 'theater'. Like do you guys watch movies in there while having surgery or what? And why do you guys say I'm going to hospital and not, I'm going to the hospital? LOL



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:39 PM
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posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
I always thought it was scheissenhaus...but then I only learned Welsh, English, and a bit of French.


I hear the French affectionately refer to using the toilet as 'Prendre l'Anglais à la piscine'.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I call it the can.............I'm going to the can.






posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Night Star
"I'm going to hospital" is the same kind of statement as "I'm going to school". It's describing a kind of environment rather than a specific building.

For that matter we have differences between "a scissors" and "a pair of scissors" (surely the latter is more grammatical).
And between "a coffee" and "some coffee".
Then there is the vexed question of whether "boggle" is a transitive or an intransitive verb; reading this thread, I would say "the mind boggles", but someone else might say "it boggles the mind".




edit on 28-2-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Haha it has been a chuckle so thanks to you and everyone who has replied.
...maybe our doctors back in the day were just acting like they knew what they were doing so the word 'theatre' stuck?!
Funny how US English written language forgot how to spell it correctly



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:48 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
And between "a coffee" and "some coffee".


In New Jersey the proper pronunciation is 'some cawfee'. Adding the words 'and hurry the eff up!' will typically see your order expedited over other diners of whatever fine establishment you happen to be patronizing.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand
Also there is the expression "theatre of war", found in military circles.
So I suggest that the word "theatre" just got expanded to mean "a defined area where things are done".



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
Adding the words 'and hurry the eff up!' will typically see your order expedited over other diners of whatever fine establishment you happen to be patronizing.

The British equivalent, in polite circles, is "As quick as you like". It is understood that the permission is not to be taken literally.


edit on 28-2-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
The British equivalent, in polite circles, is "As quick as you like". It is understood that the permission is not to be taken literally.


Ah, yes. The famous British not-so-subtle subtlety.



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