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Earth's Early Ocean Was Not Boiling Hot.

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posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Bacteria know the difference between what is consumable and what is not that would constitute awareness of what one can eat. A point being that animal life formed as result of cells that became different from bacterial cells and as a result there came organization of multicellular life. Of course basic needs are as relevant to and animal as it is important to every cell contained because of food.

The other Avatar is presents very humble orientation while this one looks like and Alien getting ready to eat something.

An interesting contrast....




posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Ghost147



Lol, this is my original one.

And wonderfully hideous.

The rectilinear crudite on the menu is particularly disconcerting. Live food?


Is there any other kind of food?


originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: Ghost147

How have we established that consciousness happened millions of years ago when life began?


Precisely, no, but we understand that self-awareness likely evolved because of the benefits it contributes understanding others and social situations, implying that self-awareness is intrinsically connected to other-awareness.

Self-awareness is a complex trait on it's own, and if it does indeed derive from social settings, then we can look through the evolution of social interaction, which too is a complex trait.

Primitive organisms that existed at the early ages of life on earth simply wouldn't have the mechanisms to achieve these traits, thus it would have taken quite some time for them to first develop.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

And how are awareness and consciousness the same?

in not consciousness the ability to reason. Like between what is right and what is wrong?



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147

Bacteria know the difference between what is consumable and what is not that would constitute awareness of what one can eat.


Not necessarily. Just because something behaves in a specific manner does not constitute a conscious action. For instance, we don't make a conscious effort to breath, despite needing to to live. The same thing goes for holding our breaths under water, which babies do if you toss them in.

(ah my good ol baby tossing days, fun times)

Biological triggers and mechanisms take care of this on their own, and not through awareness or consciousness.


originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147
The other Avatar is presents very humble orientation while this one looks like and Alien getting ready to eat something.

An interesting contrast....


Haha, it's just evaluating the skewered beastly. This Avatar has generated a lot of different opinions and emotions over the years. I'm quite fond of it. Some find it beautiful, some find it disgusting, some find it terrifying, but everyone seems to find it fascinating



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147


In context though you are suggesting a car that gets its own gas and then splits into two other cars, that then are able to get there onw gas.



According to a new study, bacteria can actually see by using themselves as camera lenses to focus light. In this respect, they go beyond just seeing—they sense where light is.

“The idea that bacteria can see their world in basically the same way that we do is pretty exciting,” said Conrad Mullineaux of the University of Freiburg in Germany and Queen Mary University of London.


Source



Bacteria are well-known to be the cause of some of the most repugnant smells on earth, but now scientists have revealed this lowest of life forms actually has a sense of smell of its own.


www.sciencedaily.com...

Two out of five senses that allow for survival and one of them is sight.

Hunger is a biological response to a condition that results in the feeding of every cell in the human body.

Dude seriously it looks like your avatar is about to eat something raw



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147
In context though you are suggesting a car that gets its own gas and then splits into two other cars, that then are able to get there onw gas.


I don't see how that analogy really applies to what I previously posted.


originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147
Hunger is a biological response to a condition that results in the feeding of every cell in the human body.


Yes, but it's not a conscious action to become hungry, it's natural trigger to a response to stresses.


originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147
Dude seriously it looks like your avatar is about to eat something raw


Possibly. Some weird alien caterpillar grub perhaps.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147


Agreed but what exactly would in purpose necessitate or make possible sight and smell?

Without a way to store information.



Do bacteria have senses?

The foregoing catalogue of cognitive sophistication makes bacteria promising candidates for mental states - until we read the fine print. Bacteria do indeed possess sensors. According to John S. Parkinson, a professor of biology at the University of Utah, "most organisms - even bacteria - can sense sound, light, pressure, gravity and chemicals" (University of Utah, 2002). E. coli bacteria "can sense and respond to changes in temperature, osmolarity, pH, noxious chemicals, DNA-damaging agents, mineral abundance, energy sources, electron acceptors, metabolites, chemical signals from other bacteria, and parasites" (Meyers and Bull, 2002, p. 555). Bacteria are very sensitive to chemicals - for instance, E. coli bacteria have five different kinds of sensors which they use to detect food. As Di Primio, Muller and Lengeler (2000, pp. 4 - 5) explain, common bacteria like E. coli swim in chemical gradients towards attractants (e.g. glucose) or away from repellents (e.g. benzoate) - a phenomenon known as chemotaxis. Other bacteria display phototaxis and magnetotaxis, or movement in response to light and magnetic fields, respectively (Martin and Gordon, 2001, p. 219). Bacteria possess an elaborate chemosensory signaling pathway, which involves the phosphorylation (combination with phosphorus compounds) of a set of proteins in the cytoplasm of a bacterial cell (Blair, 1995, p. 489).

There are several philosophical questions relating to the sensitive capacities of bacteria. Should we call these capacities bona fide senses? For that matter, what are senses, anyway? Is there a distinction between sensing an object, and being sensitive to (or being affected by) it? And is the possession of senses by an organism a sufficient condition for its having perceptions (which, in common parlance, are mental states), or can an organism have senses without the capacity to have perceptions?

In principle, anything is capable of acting as a sensor: camera film is photosensitive, as are metals which release electrons when exposed to light (the photoelectric effect). The bimetallic strip in a thermostat is a temperature sensor.


Source



A bacterium's memory is a consequence of the fact that its tracking system takes a few seconds to catch up with any alteration in chemical concentrations, enabling the bacterial cell to compare its present state with its state a short time ago. The number of receptors stimulated by attractive or repellent molecules (apparently this number is an average of measurements taken over a period of about one second) is "compared" with the number of receptors stimulated in the previous measurement (stored as an internal signal representing the average of measurements taken 3 seconds ago). The memory possessed by bacteria is minimal: it can store just one set of intermediate results, allowing bacteria to remember any changes in the concentration of attractant chemicals that have occurred in the past 3 seconds. We can formulate the following conclusion regarding the range of organisms with memory:


www.angelfire.com...


Reminds me of that scene in Men in Black when they looked into a locker and encountered a much larger perspective.

Both are very unique Avatars

edit on 27-2-2016 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:11 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: Ghost147


Agreed but what exactly would in purpose necessitate or make possible sight and smell?

Without a way to store information.


You can still store information without having consciousness or awareness. DNA itself is stored information, but it certainly is not conscious on its own. Just like the mechanisms that trigger hunger, the mechanisms that detect light and smell don't necessarily require consciousness.

Consciousness and self-awareness are only the products of already highly complex systems.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:23 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147


My initial response was in relation to awareness not consciousness.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Then, I suppose, a photoelectric cell might be considered aware?

It does "sense" changes in light levels. How that data is employed is another matter.

edit on 2/27/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:31 PM
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a reply to: Phage


A plant is considered alive. in discussion photoelectric cells do not need to look for food, while bacteria do.

What would be the equivalent to a desert, to a bacteria?

How would it respond in such an environment or alternative as relatable to this discussion.

edit on 27-2-2016 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: Kashai




A plant is considered alive. in discussion photoelectric cells do not need to look for food, while bacteria do.
Do plants look for food? Or do they propagate where conditions happen to be favorable? If a seed falls on infertile ground, what then?



How would it respond in such an environment or alternative as relatable to this discussion.
A bacterium, lacking sustenance, would die.

edit on 2/27/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Actually they respond to sunlight.


Has anyone ever stressed out a bacterium?



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: Kashai



Has anyone ever stressed out a bacterium?

You mean killed it? Yes. Frequently.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: Phage


No I mean relating to understanding its limits and still survive?



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

You think bacteria have "understanding?"

Oh my.
Save the strep! Way too Hindu for my liking.

edit on 2/27/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Actually I am wondering the distances where bacteria would find food.

edit on 27-2-2016 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: Kashai
That would depend.
Motile, or not?



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Yes Motile and in relation to scope some kind of maze.



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: Kashai
So, if not motile then not aware. Corals (more than mere bacteria) are not aware.

If motile and unable to learn a maze, not aware.



edit on 2/27/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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