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An IRS telephone scam

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posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:08 AM
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Hi guys,
This is a public service message.

A few weeks ago we had a message on our home phone (yeah it's us who still has that one) saying it was the IRS and that we owed back taxes and needed to call a certain number with a D.C. area code to resolve the matter or face legal action.
We are not wealthy and we usually get a good size refund each year so I was really perplexed. My first thought was, does the IRS call people about this stuff or do they usually notify people in writing. An online search of IRS procedures showed my thought was correct and that they don't call. They write.
Another internet search, this time for IRS centered phone scams yielded a whole page of information about a current telephone scam where people are being threatened to pay or go to jail.
I ignored the message after reading about the scam.
A few days later another call came in saying pretty much what the first one did. They don't even address us by name. We are simply "you".
I ignored that call too but did a reverse phone number search. Unfortunately these days if you want the info revealed by a reverse phone lookup you have to pay for it. I wasn't that curious but was certain it wasn't the IRS calling me.
Just a little while ago we got yet another call. This one said they would send the sheriff to my house if I didn't call this number.

The following link to AARP outlines the scam. Apparently they target seniors a lot.

action.aarp.org...

Has anyone else gotten a call like this?




posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:11 AM
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Here are more details from the IRS themselves.

www.irs.gov...



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

I think these guys would be fun to scam back. tell them the call is being traced and you have their location. then say you are sending in a SWAT team to deal with them, as you are a member of the US Secret Service and have that authority.

Just enough to let the punk on the other end know he ins't above being punked himself.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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Release the phone spiders!
Sorry,,,

Yeah it sucks. My wife works in a financial institution and deals with people that have been taken by fraud way to frequently.

*We mistakenly sent you a check for ten grand instead of seven, please wire us the three grand.

*Your granddaughter is in jail and needs five hundred in bail.

*There is a problem with your Microsoft computer,,ya da ya da..
This one is usually in a Indian accent.

*Your "insert bank name here" account has been flagged, please enter your sixteen digit debit card number to resolve the problem.

I'm sure I forgot a few,,



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Great idea. If I see that ID again I'll answer "ATF how may I direct your call. "

Actually the IRS wants to be alerted by citizens who experience this so I may call them.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

I get the AARP monthly magazine. They had an article about telephone scams. That scam was one of many scams that are targeted toward the elderly and retirees. It was an Interesting and eye-opening article. The main point of the article, if it's a long distance phone call, hang up and no legitimate organization will ask for important information over the phone. If something doesn't sound right, get the phone number and report it to the police.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

These guys are pretty persistent and now have called three times that I know. This last was the best. They're sending the sheriff to my house. I tried calling the number back since I know it's a scam, to tell them come over now and I'll make coffee and muffins but the line is always busy.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

Yes I think it's time to alert the authorities.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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Yeah, they called me yesterday too. It was a (206) number. At the end of the recorded message it said to call them back at the (206) number. I don't owe the IRS any money and so being curious and kind of bored I punched in the number. When they answered I refused to give my name and asked his name instead. His response was, "F You". I let "F You" have the third degree. At one point he did say he was in India. If I'm bored again today I may call back. This time I may make up a name like, "Mary Poppins" or "Hillary Clinton"? Idk, do y'all have any name recommendations?

STM
edit on 25-2-2016 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

They called me three times this month already. I laughed as I knew it was a scam, but then I realized many could be intimidated by this call. These guys are some real bastards because only the most vulnerable are going to fall for this. It makes me angry when I think of it now.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

If you realise they're scammers there's 2 methods to prevent others from potentially getting scammed.

Method 1. Act dumb, really dumb, the dumbest you can possibly be and basically troll the f# out of them for as long as possible, if they're on the phone to you they can't be scamming anybody else, make it into a game for how long you can actually keep them on the phone for.

Method 2. Find a whistle and blow on it as hard you can down the phone in the hopes you deafen them or give them a nasty case of tinnitus for a while.

This is a beautiful example of how to waste their time




posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: seentoomuch

Yes I finally got an answer when I called back the number. An asian sounding fellow answered so I said " yes is this the IRS scammers? "The moron says "yes". So I did as another member suggested and said I am tracing the call and have his location and that the police will be showing up soon. I said are you ready to be arrested and he says yes again. It was then I said I know this is just a scam and don't f'n call my house again.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Yes someone older who is not so tech savvy may fall prey to these guys .I got suspicious immediately as I was pretty sure the IRS doesn't call and threaten people if they don't pay right away.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: Discotech

Oh that was so funny!!! I loved the line when he's being asked to attach the power cord. The guy says it's brand new it shouldn't have any holes in it!

Priceless



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 02:18 PM
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originally posted by: seentoomuch
Yeah, they called me yesterday too. It was a (206) number. At the end of the recorded message it said to call them back at the (206) number. I don't owe the IRS any money and so being curious and kind of bored I punched in the number. When they answered I refused to give my name and asked his name instead. His response was, "F You". I let "F You" have the third degree. At one point he did say he was in India. If I'm bored again today I may call back. This time I may make up a name like, "Mary Poppins" or "Hillary Clinton"? Idk, do y'all have any name recommendations?

STM



LOL! The stuff we are willing to do when bored. Sadly I can relate. These people pretending to be the IRS have left numerous messages on our machine. Yes, we also own a wall phone.... not many of us left. Anyways- this scam is horrible and it amazes me that these people have not been shut down. It is a crime to impersonate a federal employee. I know it is a fine line but I am surprised the IRS hadn't blown a couple of million trying to stop these people.

edit on 25-2-2016 by AuntB because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: AuntB

They have been trying but it's started again by another group as soon as one is taken down.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 10:53 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: Sillyolme

If you realise they're scammers there's 2 methods to prevent others from potentially getting scammed.

Method 1. Act dumb, really dumb, the dumbest you can possibly be and basically troll the f# out of them for as long as possible, if they're on the phone to you they can't be scamming anybody else, make it into a game for how long you can actually keep them on the phone for.

Method 2. Find a whistle and blow on it as hard you can down the phone in the hopes you deafen them or give them a nasty case of tinnitus for a while.

This is a beautiful example of how to waste their time



I had a friend who would just say "one moment please...", put it on speakerphone and then repeat "Your call is important to me..." every once in a while for as long as he could.

I saw him do it for 30 minutes once while we were fixing his computer. For some reason they refused to give up.


edit on 25-2-2016 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2016 @ 06:12 AM
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Yes, I've gotten these. As well as the computer repair ones(Windows),the bank ones and more that have been going around. Best to hang up, obtain the number and report them. Many of these people making the calls may be unaware that they are committing fraud due to slave waging.

Shared from the IRS Site ,there's 12 different types of scams going around claiming to be the IRS, the phone one already covered:


Phishing: Taxpayers need to be on guard against fake emails or websites looking to steal personal information. The IRS will not send you an email about a bill or refund out of the blue. Don’t click on one claiming to be from the IRS that takes you by surprise. Taxpayers should be wary of clicking on strange emails and websites. They may be scams to steal your personal information. (IR-2015-6)

Identity Theft: Taxpayers need to watch out for identity theft especially around tax time. The IRS continues to aggressively pursue the criminals that file fraudulent returns using someone else’s Social Security number. The IRS is making progress on this front but taxpayers still need to be extremely careful and do everything they can to avoid becoming a victim. (IR-2015-7)

Return Preparer Fraud: Taxpayers need to be on the lookout for unscrupulous return preparers. The vast majority of tax professionals provide honest high-quality service. But there are some dishonest preparers who set up shop each filing season to perpetrate refund fraud, identity theft and other scams that hurt taxpayers. Return preparers are a vital part of the U.S. tax system. About 60 percent of taxpayers use tax professionals to prepare their returns. (IR-2015-8)
To:



Fake Charities: Taxpayers should be on guard against groups masquerading as charitable organizations to attract donations from unsuspecting contributors. Contributors should take a few extra minutes to ensure their hard-earned money goes to legitimate and currently eligible charities. IRS.gov has the tools taxpayers need to check out the status of charitable organizations. Be wary of charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally known organizations. (IR-2015-16)



edit on 26-2-2016 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2016 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Thanks for that. The more we can get this out the better it will be. Put these goons out of business.



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