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posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
None of you would probably believe the number of things that make it into print with mistakes in them. Election material is hardly unique. I saw an ad campaign for a triple-AAA video game title that had "lastest" instead of latest in the text. Proofread as long as I have and your "eye" never really shuts off, so you start to notice things everywhere.

You might be surprised at the number of things that make it into print that you would think would have been proofed better. And once you see the mistake, it seems so obvious to you. But, the reality is that your brain really wants to see what it knows should be there, so the mistakes really tend to be invisible. I'll admit that I had to look at the Trump example twice before I noticed Oaklahoma.

And your own writing is the hardest of all to proof because you're also working against the knowledge of what you meant to write, not just against the knowledge of what your brain knows should be there. So it's doubly hard to notice the subtle errors like form instead of from.


A typo is different than not understanding the difference between nouns and adjectives. Occasional typo is fine, I suffer from that myself. When you actually don't know the difference between certain words, that's the problem. Sometimes you wonder whether a mistake is a typo or user error.




posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

You'd be surprised. People who are ESL actually have a very reliable pattern of mistakes that is usually distinct to their own native language, meaning a Spanish speaker will tend to make the same mistakes in the same way as another Spanish speaker, and they will make different ones from a speaker of Russian whose errors will also follow a predictable pattern.

People who are just plain ignorant about it all will have no real pattern.

Then there are people who have specific learning disabilities like dyslexia. They also have certain patterns to their errors.

But I've spent time working with them, so I learned to recognize those types and patterns of errors.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ExNihiloRed

You'd be surprised. People who are ESL actually have a very reliable pattern of mistakes that is usually distinct to their own native language, meaning a Spanish speaker will tend to make the same mistakes in the same way as another Spanish speaker, and they will make different ones from a speaker of Russian whose errors will also follow a predictable pattern.

People who are just plain ignorant about it all will have no real pattern.

Then there are people who have specific learning disabilities like dyslexia. They also have certain patterns to their errors.

But I've spent time working with them, so I learned to recognize those types and patterns of errors.


No, no, I agree. You can tell based on the patterns, syntax, etc. whether someone is not a native English speaker. Let's put them aside. I'm talking about native English speakers who purport to be educated.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Yeah, well, most people wouldn't know a part of speech from a punctuation mark these days. It's a natural consequence of de-emphasizing grammar in education.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Yeah, well, most people wouldn't know a part of speech from a punctuation mark these days. It's a natural consequence of de-emphasizing grammar in education.


I just don't find that acceptable. If you don't know the difference between "then" and "than," I'm going to be skeptical of anything you say. More nuanced grammatical rules can be overlooked.
edit on 25-2-2016 by ExNihiloRed because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

I know the difference between then and than, but I often type one when I mean the other. It's easy to do. "e" and "a" are not that far apart on the keyboard.

I am not being difficult on purpose. I do understand what you mean, and my job does mainly consist of fixing "their, there, they're" errors, among other things, so I know that people don't spend enough time thinking about which of the homophones they should use although sometimes that's attributable to a type of learning disability as much as ignorance. I've seen that too.

Imagine being the kid who can't visualize the meaning of words, so you can't correctly put the meaning to the right version. They exist. The are usually the kid who takes everything too literally. You give them a story problem about tomato plants that grow 8' above the ground, and they think the plants actually are hovering 8' in the air, not simply growing 8' tall.
edit on 25-2-2016 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: ExNihiloRed

I know the difference between then and than, but I often type one when I mean the other. It's easy to do. "e" and "a" are not that far apart on the keyboard.

I am not being difficult on purpose. I do understand what you mean, and my job does mainly consist of fixing "their, there, they're" errors, among other things, so I know that people don't spend enough time thinking about which of the homophones they should use although sometimes that's attributable to a type of learning disability as much as ignorance. I've seen that too.

Imagine being the kid who can't visualize the meaning of words, so you can't correctly put the meaning to the right version. They exist. The are usually the kid who takes everything too literally. You give them a story problem about tomato plants that grow 8' above the ground, and they think the plants actually are hovering 8' in the air, not simply growing 8' tall.


I completely agree and understand.



posted on Aug, 26 2016 @ 06:19 AM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed



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