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Why Donald Trump is the only candidate who will save the United States

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posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 05:42 PM
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What people who like Trump has to understand is this:

JFK couldn’t defeat the status quo mainstream what makes you think Trump can?

All Trumps bluster?

That is even IF he is sincere


Trump is NOT a good intelligent persuader of people to his view.




posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell
What people who like Trump has to understand is this:

JFK couldn’t defeat the status quo mainstream what makes you think Trump can?

All Trumps bluster?

That is even IF he is sincere


Trump is NOT a good intelligent persuader of people to his view.



You may be right, but I'd still take 4 years of him over Hilary... Hilary is the worst thing that could happen to this country..



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 06:34 PM
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Id never expect people would take a billionair seriously that act like a teenager. Idiocracy will become reality. Imigrants??? They tukrr jobss!!



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 06:59 PM
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mikenormaneconomics.blogspot.com...
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Matthew MacWilliams — The best predictor of Trump support isn't income, education, or age. It's authoritarianism.
In the five days leading up to the South Carolina Republican primary I fielded a survey of 358 likely voters, hoping to better understand who supports Donald Trump, why, and what it may mean for the Republican presidential nominating contest.
What I found is a trend that has been widely overlooked. A voter’s gender, education, age, ideology, party identification, income, and race simply had no statistical bearing on whether someone supported Trump. Neither, despite predictions to the contrary, did evangelicalism.
Here is what did: authoritarianism, by which I mean Americans’ inclination to authoritarian behavior. When political scientists use the term authoritarianism, we are not talking about dictatorships but about a worldview. People who score high on the authoritarian scale value conformity and order, protect social norms, and are wary of outsiders. And when authoritarians feel threatened, they support aggressive leaders and policies.
Authoritarianism and a hybrid variable that links authoritarianism with a personal fear of terrorism were the only two variables that predicted, with statistical significance, support for Trump.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

Nope. I agree with some of the talking heads on CNN. The only way people will wish Trump is President, is if Ted Cruz is elected.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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Donald Trump is the best thing that ever happened to the Democrats. Most people in the US are moderates and they are scared to death of Trump and his violent racist persona. The Moderates will turn out to vote in record numbers and carry the dembs into the Whitehouse because most of Trumps followers are LIV and don't vote anyway; being arrogant and loud doesn't translate in votes. Even moderate Republicans will cross political lines to vote against the Donald.

Could this be Trumps strategy?.....hmmmmm
edit on 24-2-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: DimensionalChange03
a reply to: Informer1958

Why would trump be assassinated? He's a threat to no one. He's a billionaire who's gonna give tax breaks to the rich and thinks the minimum wage is too high, he's not gonna go after big pharma and the private health insurance companies, he's not gonna break up the Wall Street banks, he's not gonna go after corporations hiding their money in off-shore accounts, and he's pro war which keeps the military industrial complex and war profiteers in business.


As much as I would like to believe that there might be some redeeming potential to a Trump presidency, oh gee I wish I wish I wish, I have to go with your points above.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell
What people who like Trump has to understand is this:

JFK couldn’t defeat the status quo mainstream what makes you think Trump can?

All Trumps bluster?

That is even IF he is sincere


Trump is NOT a good intelligent persuader of people to his view.






Who do we have that isn't an establishment politician who is also NOT a coward? No one except perhaps Trump. That says a lot about his character that he has the guts to buck the fixed system.
Anyone with the guts to try is worth allowing a chance. Obama simply took Bush's baton toss and even doubled down on all of Bush's policies while claiming the whole time to reverse everything Bush did, and we all know he never came through even once on his anti Bush plans.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: alan2102z

I am not disinclined to believe this. You know why? Because I can feel the tug myself. As you have brought this to an already existing thread, it might be interesting if you were to buff it up and run it as a thread unto itself,



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 09:11 PM
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Trump? I'm a supporter and agree with the OP. Egotistical as he may be. He does not like to lose, and doesn't like to live in what could arguably be seen as a weak or failing nation.

And nope, I'm not a huge fan of billionaires, and he isn't the ideal human being by any stretch.

But then, neither is anyone else.

The Donald may not be the president we all want, but trust me, at this point in time, he IS the president we need.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

i see a lot of people saying this but there isnt much difference between clinton and sanders, at least clinton has a better foreign policy than sanders. if she kept the status quo, she would be a fine president, whereas trump would bring a lot of oppression for a lot of minorities including the middle class. and i dont even like clinton, im just pointing out this rediculous meme that clinton is the worst person ever.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: AlienView

...And if his egotism and temperament alienates our allies and creates enough hate from the members of congress and the senate, how does someone like that get anything done? Our system of government is still run by checks and balances. If a president is going to have an obnoxious attitude, your not going to have many on your side to pass any kind of legislation.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537


To be totally honest, seeing as much traction as Trump's gained should show each politician in DC how fed up we are with the job they're collectively doing (or not doing)... We are so fed up, we are essentially willing to take a foul mouthed, reality TV star over what we already have in DC..


Or (and more importantly), we are so fed up we are willing to take an honest Democratic Socialist who will do his best to sever the Government's reliance on Big Business, Lobbyists, Special Interests, SuperPACs, Big Banks, and Campaign Finance corruption.......
don't forget, Trump is one of those. His clothing products are made in China and Bangladesh and Mexico.
Is he going to bring all of those jobs back here?
Is he going to pay taxes on all of his hoard?
How about saving Social Security, and making sure all Americans are free from worry about pending homelessness and starvation?


I'm all ears.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 10:05 PM
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Here's a new development, guess I'm voting, "Team Trump".

Source: freebeacon.com...

China warned the United States on Wednesday not to adopt punitive currency policies that could disrupt U.S.-China relations after Donald Trump’s win in the Nevada caucus.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters in Beijing that “we are following with interest the U.S. presidential election.”

Hua was asked about China’s response to a possible Trump presidency and his announced plan to punish China for currency manipulation with a tax on Chinese goods.

“Since it belongs to the domestic affair of the U.S., I am not going to make comments on specific remarks by the relevant candidate,” she said.

“But I want to stress that China and the U.S., as world’s largest developing and developed countries, shoulder major responsibilities in safeguarding world peace, stability and security and driving world development,” the spokeswoman added.

“The sustained, sound and steady growth of China-U.S. relations serves the fundamental and long-term interests of the two countries and benefits the world. We hope and believe that the U.S. government will pursue a positive policy toward China in a responsible manner.”

The comments came as Wang Yi, the Chinese foreign minister, is holding talks in Washington that include U.S. concerns about a Chinese military buildup on disputed islands in the South China Sea, and cooperation on dealing with North Korea’s nuclear and missile provocations.

Hua said Wang and Secretary of State John Kerry agreed the two sides will enhance cooperation and increase talks and exchanges.

“We stand ready to preserve and advance China-U.S. relations together with the U.S. side,” she said.

Kerry said he spoke to Wang about reducing tensions and finding diplomatic solutions to competing South China Sea claims.

“We want there to be a halt to the expansion and militarization of occupied features,” Kerry said. “Everyone benefits by true demilitarization, non-militarization.”

Kerry also said the United States remains committed to freedom of navigation and overflight, “something which China says it does not stand in the way of; it agrees that there should be peaceful freedom of navigation.”

Reports from Asia say Chinese state-run media have been ordered by the Communist Party to minimize reporting on the U.S. presidential election.

Hong Kong’s Chinese-language news outlet Oriental Daily reported Feb. 5 that the Party’s Propaganda Department, which sets policies for all state-run media, ordered all publications to ban election coverage of U.S. policies toward China and to focus election coverage on negative stories and scandals.

Trump won the Nevada caucus with 45 percent of the vote, increasing his chances of winning the Republican nomination later this year.

Last month, Trump vowed to impose a 45 percent tariff on Chinese good to offset China’s devaluation of the yuan.

“They’re devaluing their currency, and they’re killing our companies,” Trump said. “We are letting them get away with it, and we can’t let them get away with it.”

The Obama administration has adopted conciliatory policies toward China on trade and currency issues.

Trump, on his campaign website, outlined a hardline approach to dealing with China that involves officially declaring China a currency manipulator and negotiating an end to the practice.

Trump also wants to thwart China’s theft of intellectual property and adopt policies aimed at bring jobs back from overseas to the United States.

Bolstering the U.S. military and “deploying it appropriately in the East and South China Seas” are other goals.

“These actions will discourage Chinese adventurism that imperils American interests in Asia and shows our strength as we begin renegotiating our trading relationship with China,” the Trump website states. “A strong military presence will be a clear signal to China and other nations in Asia and around the world that America is back in the global leadership business.”


And more importantly:

Source:

WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) - A spate of proposed Chinese takeovers of U.S. companies, from the Chicago Stock Exchange to makers of high-end semiconductors, has created a vibrant business for a small circuit of Washington insiders who advise on how to get cross-border deals approved by the U.S. government.

Several former U.S. officials have in recent years joined the ranks of lawyers, consultants and lobbyists that have emerged as key brokers in trying to get Chinese acquisitions or investments in U.S. companies approved by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which scrutinizes deals for national security concerns.

Because this interagency panel, comprising 16 U.S. government departments or agencies and chaired by the Treasury, does not publish its decisions or its reasoning for them, advisers say inside knowledge and connections are important to navigate what outsiders often see as a "black-box" review process.

There have been 22 M&A transactions announced in the United States so far in 2016 involving Chinese acquirers, worth a combined $23 billion, according to Thomson Reuters data. That is a massive increase from 88 deals worth $13 billion for all of 2015, and 88 deals for $7 billion in 2014.

For a graphic showing Chinese acquisitions of U.S. companies by number and value, see tmsnrt.rs...

It has all boosted corporate demand for former officials who served on CFIUS or have knowledge of the inner workings of the agency, several lawyers, consultants and lobbyists involved in the advisory work told Reuters.

"We're just completely overwhelmed," said one lawyer involved in advising on the CFIUS process, who asked not to be named because he was not authorized to speak with the media.

China's aggressive, often state-backed overseas buying spree has set off alarm bells among some politicians in Washington who are already on edge as China’s armed forces expand their presence in the South China Sea and because of high-profile hacking attacks against U.S. government agencies and corporations, which U.S. officials and security software companies have blamed on China.

Adding to the tensions are attacks on China’s trade policy, and in particular its surplus with the U.S., by Donald Trump, who is leading the race to be the Republican candidate in November’s presidential election.

Among the former officials who use their CFIUS experience in advisory work are Anne Salladin, who reviewed some 500 deals that went to CFIUS during her 20 years at the Treasury. Her role at law firm Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP has included advising a Chinese private equity firm on the acquisition of some semiconductor-related assets. Other officials include former U.S. Treasury deputy assistant secretary for investment security and policy Nova Daly, now with the law firm Wiley Rein LLP, and former Department of Homeland Security assistant secretary for policy Stewart Baker, now with law firm Steptoe & Johnson LLP, according to the websites of their employers.

Baker worked on the acquisition of Motorola Mobility by Chinese PC and smartphone maker Lenovo Group in 2014, while Daly advised U.S. hard-disk maker Western Digital Corp on a proposed investment by China's Unisplendour Corp Ltd that was abandoned this week amid CFIUS concerns.

All three of the former officials declined to comment for this story.

Whitney Smith, a Treasury spokesperson, declined to comment on CFIUS's relationship with company advisors.

GAUGING SENTIMENT

Before a deal is announced, the advisors will often seek to gauge its chances for CFIUS approval by holding a preliminary meeting with key officials. If the initial reaction is hostile, then this can avoid the embarrassment and cost of announcing a deal that is later scuppered, said Mark Plotkin, a CFIUS expert with the law firm Covington & Burling LLP.

A good CFIUS advisor will figure out what issues might crop up in a certain deal – such as cutting edge chip technology or Pentagon contracts -- and discuss how to best handle these with the agencies most likely to be concerned, said Plotkin.

"The CFIUS process is going to be a full-body X-ray of the target," he said.

Another lawyer involved in CFIUS work, who spoke privately, said that he gives a 45-minute presentation to Pentagon officials and then carefully examines the questions asked, as well as body language, to judge their level of discomfort with a particular deal.

It is not unlike a preliminary meeting that antitrust lawyers might request with the Justice Department or Federal Trade Commission about an antitrust review of a merger, the lawyers said.

Not all CFIUS advisors are hired to help a deal go through. Some are brought in by corporate competitors to lobby against a deal, while others are tapped by investors making bets on whether a transaction will be cleared by CFIUS. For instance, Mario Mancuso, a partner at law firm Kirkland & Ellis LLP who formerly sat on CFIUS as undersecretary of commerce for industry and security, now typically advises companies. But he also represented some investors in pork producer Smithfield Foods when China's Shuanghui International made a successful bid for the company in 2013.

MORE WILLING TO HIRE

This CFIUS advisory business is also benefiting from Chinese companies’ new willingness to spend on advisors.

Traditionally, Chinese companies had been mistrustful of advisors, or unwilling to pay for them, some investment bankers and lawyers say. But the Chinese government’s encouragement of outbound deal-making has spurred many of the country’s companies to spend on advisors, including CFIUS experts, these people say.

A CFIUS review typically lasts between one and three months and can cost from as little as $50,000 to as much as $1 million for more complicated or controversial transactions, according to a CFIUS expert who has shepherded deals through the process.

China led the pack of countries whose planned U.S. acquisitions and investments in 2014 were probed for U.S. security implications, making it the most scrutinized country by CFIUS, according to the latest CFIUS annual report, which was released last Friday. No official data is available for 2015.

Chinese bids for technology and chip makers get particular scrutiny, CFIUS experts say. Semiconductors form electronic cores for a long list of military systems, including drones, guided missiles and bombs.

To be sure, even with expert advice, companies can get it wrong. In the case of Western Digital, the company had told investors that it believed Unisplendour acquiring a 15 percent non-controlling stake would not be subject to a CFIUS review But CFIUS informed Western Digital it would review the transaction nonetheless, prompting Unisplendour to pull out.

CFIUS concerns also killed other semiconductor deals in the past few weeks. Fairchild Semiconductor International Inc earlier this month rejected an acquisition offer from China Resources Microelectronics Ltd and Hua Capital Management Co Ltd, over concerns that CFIUS would stop the deal. Last month, Philips scrapped a $3.3 billion deal to sell a division which makes LED lights to Chinese investors also because of CFIUS concerns.

U.S. politicians have also began to agitate over some of these deals. Last week, a group of 46 U.S. lawmakers urged CFIUS to take a hard look at a bid by Chongqing Casin Enterprise Group to buy the Chicago Stock Exchange because of concerns that China would gain access to information about U.S. companies.

COTTAGE INDUSTRY The cottage industry that has developed around CFIUS includes a wide array of actors.

Law firms such as Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Covington & Burling offer to provide insight into how CFIUS will view a deal, tapping into their working relationships with CFIUS officials at several government departments. Skadden declined comment for this story.

Lobbying firms, including Podesta Group and BGR Group, both of whom boast CFIUS experts on their websites, seek to persuade lawmakers and U.S. officials that a transaction is not threatening, as any concerns they harbor can trickle down to CFIUS officials, according to industry sources. BGR declined to comment, while Podesta did not respond to requests for comment. Management consulting firms, such as Accenture Plc and Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd, offer to help companies address national security risks identified by CFIUS. So-called "mitigation measures" can range from asset sales to ensuring that only U.S. citizens perform certain tasks. Deloitte declined to comment. Sorting out who among the advisors have connections and insight into CFIUS is not always easy.

"Some of the law firms specializing in this stuff are excellent, while others sign companies on for terms that are utterly unimplementable," said Accenture consultant Andrew Walker, who helps companies comply with conditions imposed by CFIUS.


STM

edit on 24-2-2016 by seentoomuch because: The second article source is:news.yahoo.com...



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: Willtell



JFK couldn’t defeat the status quo mainstream what makes you think Trump can?

Trump hasnt mentioned anything about doing away with the Federal Reserve (at least , yet)




posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: Slanter Trump actually admits that he was greedy but he says now he has enough and its time to be greedy for us.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 11:33 PM
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a reply to: WeRpeons I don't think Hilary or Bernie would have a walk in the park with a mainly republican congress, it would be like Obama all over.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 11:52 PM
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Let's dispel once and for all with this fiction that Donald Trump doesn't know what he's doing. He knows exactly what he's doing. Donald Trump is undertaking an effort to change this country, to make America great again!

- Reprogrammed Robo Rubio




posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: jhn7537


To be totally honest, seeing as much traction as Trump's gained should show each politician in DC how fed up we are with the job they're collectively doing (or not doing)... We are so fed up, we are essentially willing to take a foul mouthed, reality TV star over what we already have in DC..


Or (and more importantly), we are so fed up we are willing to take an honest Democratic Socialist who will do his best to sever the Government's reliance on Big Business, Lobbyists, Special Interests, SuperPACs, Big Banks, and Campaign Finance corruption.......
don't forget, Trump is one of those. His clothing products are made in China and Bangladesh and Mexico.
Is he going to bring all of those jobs back here?
Is he going to pay taxes on all of his hoard?
How about saving Social Security, and making sure all Americans are free from worry about pending homelessness and starvation?


I'm all ears.



In a utopic society, Bernie would be a wonderful figure head, but in today's world, his plan, isn't even remotely possible. I understand that a lot of his supporters enjoy the idea of these promises he shares with us, but I don't see how congress would EVER allow any of his current plans to pass, especially with the amount of lobbying power that's running unregulated in D.C. Does anyone really believe in a 4 year span that Bernie would be able to take office and take on Wall Street and all the major corporations? Come on... This is a battle he'll never win, which means 4 years of Bernie will bring 4 years of a stagnant government... I'll take wild card Trump over Bernie or Hilary...
edit on 25-2-2016 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 01:47 AM
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Excuse me!

Coming through!

Yeah, sorry, I have to vomit..



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