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Questions on my mind

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posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:29 PM
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Pardon me if sum1 had already post this thread.

I've got couple of questions and um..the questions may sound a bit childish ya. Well

A- Apart from what v r told via holy books, why we humans, in general, assume that there exist only one God? Can't it b possible that he may hav friends, superior like him!

B- If God is our creator, thn who created God?

edit on 23-2-2016 by AsianStellar because: .




posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar

There is no "one God" sitting somewhere on a throne watching you play with yourself.

There are however, very powerful beings out there that one day a long long time ago created the humanoids on this planet.

There were several projects ranging through different time periods all over earth.

Most all if not all of the early humans called them gods (plural).
It wasn't until the TPTB that sculpted modern religion into what it is today, narrowed it down to just one god, who watched your every move. He even knows when one of your hairs turn gray.



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: AsianStellar
A- Apart from what v r told via holy books, why we humans, in general, assume that there exist only one God? Can't it b possible that he may hav friends, superior like him!

If you don't want to believe any scriptures, you can let philosophy take you where it leads you.
Those who accept the Bible as scripture understand it as coming from the Creator God, who tells us himself that he is unique.

B- If God is our creator, thn who created God?

This is an unworkable question, and the reason why it's an unworkable question is explained in this thread, which is too long to summarise;
The "Beyond God" questions



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: EmmanuelGoldstein

Right. Thn again, what's ur assumptions, who hav created those powerful beings or so called ET, in first place?



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar

To who created the "gods" and all of us...

Not sure for sure, but a giant pile of elements compacted into an unmeasurably small amount of space suddenly exploded and gave birth to stars and planets, etc.

Some of these planets are close enough to a star so that their elements exist in solids, liquids, gases and plasma.
It seems that naturally some elements start to act strangely and through the aid of moisture, electricity and radiation, they started to "replicate" their own structures without the help of lava or explosions, etc.

One thing leads to another and the basic building blocks of simple fungus appears.

We, the giant walking mushroom, like all lifeforms, are no more than mold that replicated itself and has created a grid around the "computer" in our nervous system. We call this grid "consciousness"



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

I see. Yeah,thanks



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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originally posted by: AsianStellar
Pardon me if sum1 had already post this thread.

I've got couple of questions and um..the questions may sound a bit childish ya. Well

A- Apart from what v r told via holy books, why we humans, in general, assume that there exist only one God? Can't it b possible that he may hav friends, superior like him!

B- If God is our creator, thn who created God?


god the father is the son of god from the future.
He created himself.

In the bible jesus said to his apostles "Ye are Gods."



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 02:01 PM
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The “Beyond God” questions are questions prompted by the Biblical understanding that God is the Creator of the world.
On this understanding, there’s a distinction between God and the created world; God is not the world and the world is not God.
So this is necessarily different from the understanding (the Monist approach) that God and the world are the same thing.
On the latter view, the statement that God created the world would have no meaning, so a Monist doesn’t need to examine the concept.

Apart from the bare statement that “God made the world”, we’ve developed other ways of referring to the relation between them.
People have described God as “above” or “beyond” the world, as existing “before the world began”, and so forth.
Then speculation looks at these descriptions and asks why they can’t be extended beyond God, and that’s how the “Beyond God” questions arise.

Related in space

So, for example, people found it natural to describe God as “above” the world in which we live.
In the Middle Ages, this would have been understood in a naively literal way.
The location of God had a place in their astronomy beyond the spheres in which the sun, the moon, and the other planets were revolving.
If someone had asked “What is beyond God, in space?”, their answer would probably have been that the question was meaningless because God is infinite.

In modern times, we’ve abandoned the literal understanding of God being “above”, in terms of space.
In fact God has been taken out of space.
Space can be understood as one of the features of the created world.
Therefore the relation of “space” can’t be applied to the relation between God and the world, except in a metaphorical way, by analogy.

But the question “What lies beyond?” is the kind of question that belongs to a universe defined by the dimensions of space.
If God is not contained within a spatial universe, then the question “What lies beyond God?” has no meaning.
This is a different way of coming to the same conclusion.

Related in time

We often speak of God as preceding the world in time.
This kind of language can be found in the Bible, as in the declaration that Christians were chosen in Christ “before the foundation of the world”.
If the Bible writers were asked “What was before God, in time?”, their answer would have been that the question was meaningless because God is eternal.

But there’s also another way of dealing with the question.
This involves recognising (as taught by Einstein) that time is to be counted as one of the dimensions of the physical world.
In other words, “time”, like space, is one of the features of the created world.
Therefore the relation of “time” can’t be applied to the relation between God and the world.

But the question “What was there before?” is the kind of question that belongs to a universe defined by the dimensions of space and time.
So if God is not contained within a spatial universe, then the question “What was before God?” has no more meaning than the question “What’s on the other side of God?”

The cause-and-effect relation

In the philosophy of Aquinas (for example), God is identified as the cause of the created world.
This gives rise to the question “Does God himself have a cause?”, commonly expressed in the form “Who made God?”
Aquinas would have answered that there must be a first cause in the series, making “First Cause” part of the definition of God.
But can a God who “has no cause” find a place in the chain of “cause-and-effect”?
Many philosophers would contest the claim.

You may be able to see where this is heading.
I’ll be putting forward a different way of dealing with this question.

I propose that the “cause-and-effect” relationship is another of the features of the physical world, like the dimensions of time and space.
If that is the case, then the “cause-and-effect” relation cannot strictly be applied to the relation between God and the world.

It would also mean that the question “What caused this?” should be understood, once again, as the kind of question that belongs to the physical universe, defined by the dimensions of space and time.
So if God is not contained within this physical universe, then the question “What caused God?”, or “Who made God?”, has no more meaning than the question “What is on the other side of God, in space or time?”

The problem is that we are creatures of the physical world ourselves.
Therefore we use the language of the physical world, talking in terms of “time” and “space” and “cause-and-effect”, because these are the only concepts that we can frame and understand.
When it’s applied to the way that God relates to the world, and even more so when it’s applied to God himself, this language is inaccurate.
Its terms can’t entirely be taken at face value.
If we don’t remember those limitations, and allow for them, that’s when we’re tempted into framing the misleading “Beyond God” questions.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Deep & interesting.

Wel to add few more questions, what's ur assessment abt d stories( Genesis) mentioned in holy books,Bible to b precise, such as creation of earth etc. Why did they came up with such stories which does not hold true in modern sci. World?



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar
Short answer; the explanations needed to be given in terms that the people of the time would understand.
Nobody was writing a science book. They were teaching people how they should relate to their God.

And please, this is a writing forum, not a texting forum. If you want to be understood, you need to be writing real words, not abbreviations.
bvdshvnudrbvdubv?




edit on 24-2-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI
Aye sir

Well there are section of people who still believes what's written in Holy books. Someone who has just discovered the truth, may find that all he/she learned or told was a lie.Although that's not the case. That way he is bound to question the integrity of that holy book or even disbelieve God for he was deceived ( on basis of what he read and what he discovered later). So, what's the point of telling such stories or did they just undermine humans or probably they thought they could just get away you know, making people believe to it via scaring them ?



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar
The point of telling the stories was to express the things they believed to be true;
That they were in personal contact with the God who created the world.
That this God wanted people to understand that they should recognise him as Creator of the world, and also wanted people to understand how they should treat one another.
The different stories illustrate the teaching by showing this God in action, relating with his people.
It's all about believing in (and trusting in) the God who lies behind the book, rather than believing in the book itself.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Do you believe in God, it's existence the way religious books has described him?



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar
I believe there is a Creator God, with a conscious intelligence and will, and that the Bible tells the story of the way this God has been communicating with and relating to the people of the world.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

I appreciate your time . Thank you

edit on 24-2-2016 by AsianStellar because: .



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar
You're welcome.
Most of my threads are on different aspects of religious belief, but all from the mainstream Christian viewpoint.
You will easily find people on ATS who will tell you that this is all wrong.



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Since you have mentioned about your threads, I got one more question,last for sure, if you don't mind.
How do you see Religion, playing it's role in human life in the next 100 years or so?



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: AsianStellar
Obviously Biblical religion is going to come under greater pressure. That was predictable anyway. It fits in with the rest of Biblical experience that those who trust in God should end up as a "remnant".
But it doesn't follow that the world will become more sceptical. If an environmental crisis develops in the way that "global warming" theory predicts, then I can see the emergence of a human crisis of confidence, and a panic-driven appeal to religious views of a more "new age" type, such as a personified "Gaia".



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Right.



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