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Dark matter might have killed the dinosaurs (dark matter theory)

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posted on May, 18 2016 @ 05:50 AM
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Sooooo, you believe in dark matter etc.... and it killed the dinosaurs. ?..

So, what else , could dark matter maybe do?..




posted on May, 18 2016 @ 06:53 AM
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So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads! What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 06:56 AM
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originally posted by: hidingthistime
So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads!
Oh I'm sorry. I didn't realise there was a strict time table to answer your questions.


What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?
Pass.
edit on 1852016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Sorry this sounds like an excuse to sell a book. No one knows what really killed the dinosaurs. However, not all dinosaurs became extinct did they? In addition the small mammals who were living at the same time as the dinosaurs survived. IMHO large animals (just happened to be dinosaurs) died off. Small mammals and small feathered dinosaurs (hint there) survived. If those mammals where hibernating and the feathered dinosaurs flying then this all points to survival being dependant on sleeping through low food availability or flying to where it is growing for the short seasons. The oceans would be similar since the bottom of the food chain is the plankton. Again the solution to the conundrum is what can cause very short seasons for growth and affect plankton.......

Still points to atmospheric disturbance and thus probably a meteor strike.



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: yorkshirelad
a reply to: TerryDon79

Sorry this sounds like an excuse to sell a book.
I would have agreed if I didn't dig deeper.


No one knows what really killed the dinosaurs.
We're pretty sure it was an object from space impacting earth.

[/quite]However, not all dinosaurs became extinct did they? In addition the small mammals who were living at the same time as the dinosaurs survived. IMHO large animals (just happened to be dinosaurs) died off. Small mammals and small feathered dinosaurs (hint there) survived. If those mammals where hibernating and the feathered dinosaurs flying then this all points to survival being dependant on sleeping through low food availability or flying to where it is growing for the short seasons.or those animals were tucked away underground or in caves, away from any excess heat?


The oceans would be similar since the bottom of the food chain is the plankton. Again the solution to the conundrum is what can cause very short seasons for growth and affect plankton.......
I'm not sure I see the relevance. Can you expand what you mean?


Still points to atmospheric disturbance and thus probably a meteor strike.
I agree. And so does the article.

My op isn't suggesting that dark matter swamped the planet. It's hypothesising that dark matter influenced object far away and changed their course to impact the planet.



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime
So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads!
Oh I'm sorry. I didn't realise there was a strict time table to answer your questions.


What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?
Pass.
pass?.... what kind of a cop out is that? I was just giving you a taste of your own medicine there kiddo.

Pass..... great answer!



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: hidingthistime

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime
So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads!
Oh I'm sorry. I didn't realise there was a strict time table to answer your questions.


What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?
Pass.
pass?.... what kind of a cop out is that? I was just giving you a taste of your own medicine there kiddo.

Pass..... great answer!


What exactly do you want? This thread is about dark matter influencing object light years away.



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime
So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads!
Oh I'm sorry. I didn't realise there was a strict time table to answer your questions.


What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?
Pass.
pass?.... what kind of a cop out is that? I was just giving you a taste of your own medicine there kiddo.

Pass..... great answer!


What exactly do you want? This thread is about dark matter influencing object light years away.
so, how, and in what ways can this dark matter influence things light years away?



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:15 AM
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originally posted by: hidingthistime

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: hidingthistime
So, you dont want to answe my questions, but sure are demanding in my threads!
Oh I'm sorry. I didn't realise there was a strict time table to answer your questions.


What else did dark matter kill? Could it effect collective memories? What toher things has it caused?
Pass.
pass?.... what kind of a cop out is that? I was just giving you a taste of your own medicine there kiddo.

Pass..... great answer!


What exactly do you want? This thread is about dark matter influencing object light years away.
so, how, and in what ways can this dark matter influence things light years away?


It's in the article I linked in the op.



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 08:39 AM
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I am in accord with schuelers post.

Personally I dont buy the dark matter theory and think that something else is responsible for that energy. I feel the dark matter theory will eventually be discarded. Probablly in a decade or so as that energy discrepancy get attributed to something else.



posted on May, 18 2016 @ 08:43 AM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
I am in accord with schuelers post.

Personally I dont buy the dark matter theory and think that something else is responsible for that energy. I feel the dark matter theory will eventually be discarded. Probablly in a decade or so as that energy discrepancy get attributed to something else.


Possibly, but that's the fun of science. Speculation and ideas leading to a hypothesis and then maybe to a theory. If something gets proven wrong or more likely then that gets explored.

I like the ideas and hypothesise of dark matter, but I can't say that dark matter actually exists.



posted on May, 19 2016 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: DogMeat
Anything is possible when we know nothing, nor cannot prove anything...

Kewl Idea tho...........


That's the thing. You can't see Dark Matter. No "Dark Matter Disk" has ever been found. Yes, the Solar System wobbles about the Galactic Center. So....

IF there is Dark Matter in our galaxy, and


Likely to be true from astronomical observations.


IF this Dark Matter is in the form of a DIsk,


Particular dynamics of Dark Matter is not so clear, but this is plausible


and
IF this disk is above or below the Galactic Center, and


Unclear.



IF our Solar System periodically wandered into this disk's influence,


If there were such a disc it would be true.


and
IF this disk's influence were to break comets loose from the Oort Cloud, and


Well, any gravitational influence breaks comets loose from Oort Cloud, whether stars (light matter) or dark matter.


IF one of those comets hit the Earth 60 million years ago, then
Dead Dinosaurs.


You can't distinguish a "dark matter generated comet" from one from another cause (the usual is stars), but it could increase the probability.


I do not think it is ignorant to point out that this is a pretty long chain of theoretical "Ifs" to get from postulating the existence of Dark Matter to Dead Dinosaurs. OK, it's acknowledged speculation. But there is no good reason to place this chain of speculation at the forefront of Dead Dinosaur Theories.


The question is whether the Dino-Killer could have been an Oort cloud comet, and is there physical reason to think it's a possibility or not? This is more paleogeochemistry.




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