It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Nice Nevada Desert shots from a drone

page: 3
7
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 08:23 PM
link   
a reply to: gariac

I just ordered a KR1.5 filter off eBay for my Canon lens. They seem to be rather rare.

A 95mm one for my big lens is a bit out of my price range. I have an FLD filter for that one though, might help?

Can't find one to fit the Celestron C-90 I just bought though. Might have to see if I can locate one for the eyepiece on this.

Sounds like a drone way out of my price range.

This answers my question about altitude restrictions within an MOA - less than 1500 ft. Also shows someone at Nevada DOT has a sense of humor (see arrow)

edit on 28-2-2016 by FosterVS because: (no reason given)


www.nevadadot.com...
edit on 28-2-2016 by FosterVS because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 01:57 AM
link   
a reply to: FosterVS

You may not want to hear this, but I have found a refractor telescope is what you want for panoramas. The bottom of the line would be something like an ED80.

I've used a Mak, and here are the problems. The mirror focus just doesn't hold in the desert heat, and especially if you are shooting when the temperature is changing, as in the early morning. The Mak doesn't have uniform brightness across the field. You can see panoramas with bright spots in every frame that is used to make the full image. Now you can field flatten to some degree with a photo editor. I use rawtherapee. Even a refractor telescope needs some field flattening. Lastly the edges tend to lose focus on a Mak.

Depending on your hardware, you can put the filter at the back of the telescope. Mine doesn't even have threads on the front for a filter.



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 01:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: FosterVS

You may not want to hear this, but I have found a refractor telescope is what you want for panoramas. The bottom of the line would be something like an ED80.

I've used a Mak, and here are the problems. The mirror focus just doesn't hold in the desert heat, and especially if you are shooting when the temperature is changing, as in the early morning. The Mak doesn't have uniform brightness across the field. You can see panoramas with bright spots in every frame that is used to make the full image. Now you can field flatten to some degree with a photo editor. I use rawtherapee. Even a refractor telescope needs some field flattening. Lastly the edges tend to lose focus on a Mak.

Depending on your hardware, you can put the filter at the back of the telescope. Mine doesn't even have threads on the front for a filter.


I have a refractor, and a large telephone lens. The C-90 is more for visual. I just want to have the gear to try it with a DSLR, see how it does. Not great, according to your experiences. One thing I might do is mask the thing, and spray paint it white, or just wrap it in white paper.. Might help keep the temperature down. I read about guys installing fans on their bigger scopes for that problem.
edit on 29-2-2016 by FosterVS because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 05:04 PM
link   
a reply to: FosterVS

The fan on the reflectors isn't used during operation as far as I know. What they try to do is get both the tubes in the scope to the same temperature so that there are no air currents due to a temperature differential. The advantage to a refractor is there is only one tube, so the internal air flow is less of an issue.

Daytime terrestrial telephotography and astrophotography do have different nuances as well as similarities.

The refractor will need a barlow or eyepiece projection through an ortho eyepiece. You need to achieve at least 2000mm equivalent focal length. A cheap ortho eyepiece projection is better than a cheap barlow, but an expensive barlow beats eyepiece projection. Having spent money on both, that is my conclusion. Eyepiece projection using those "University Optics" orthos is pretty good. The one drawback being it can be a bit tricky to get a larger than stock T-mount connection on the back end.

To elaborate a bit, the stock T-mount is not large enough to feed light to a full frame 35mm camera. Using one produces vignetting way worse than the usual darkening at the edges due to just optics. So if you can't come up with a wide mount scheme, you need to use a 1.4 teleconverter right at the camera in addition to anything up stream.

Televue powermates solve this with custom wide T-rings, as do a few even higher end vendors.

Most of these barlows can accommodate filters.

What some people do is just take more photos and crop the edges.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 12:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: gariac

originally posted by: SpeedFanatic
The YouTube movies in question just returned to his YouTube channel.


The long, 10 minutes video still isn't back.


If anyone managed to get a copy of that video before it was pulled, please either PM or email me.



new topics

top topics
 
7
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join