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Is it wise to 'believe whatever you want'?

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posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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I hear this advice from time to time, "believe whatever you want." My understanding is that the phrase refers to basing one's beliefs on anything one wishes regardless of the facts. Is it wise to do that?

I think it's always a bad idea. One problem with it is the fact that if you're believing whatever you want, you're usually basing your beliefs on assumptions. As I discussed in the following thread, the more assumptions one makes, the less likely they are to be right.

Adding assumptions does not get one closer to reality

Another problem with believing whatever you want is the fact that it's been proven to be dangerous. Here's an example:

Snake-Handling Pentecostal Pastor Dies From Snake Bite

I know that many who believe "everyone creates their own reality based on their beliefs" like to think that believing whatever you want is the key to getting the reality you want. Well, it didn't work for the pastor above. And, there are cases like that all the time, of course.

Another problem with believing whatever you want is the fact that it simply doesn't produce results a lot of the time. If you don't believe it, go sit down at a poker table where a few professional poker players are playing. I guarantee that unless you're an expert or very lucky you're going to lose.

That's why casinos are often so huge and beautiful, the house always wins. You don't have to believe it, your belief doesn't change a thing.
edit on 18-2-2016 by Profusion because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

The right to your individual beliefs, juxtaposed to being forced to believe a specific spirituality, religion, doctrine, is essential for all free persons. It is interesting that you even question this.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:22 AM
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Who was it that typed... " It is better to think You're an idiot than to allow others to tell You WHAT to think " We won't even delve into the whole 'information/ dis-information' conundrum along with one of the greatest here at ATS® the catch-all "Prove It"..

Maybe what would be easier to gut would be "Think what You want but if it differs from the main stream don't say anything"

Which led to the adage "Be thought a fool or open Your mouth and remove any doubt..."

Which leads Me to believe that is what Lao Tzu was driving at when He said "The One who knows does not talk; The One who talks does not know"

You can THINK whatever You want, it is only when You animate or put those thoughts in action is when the issue develops...

namaste



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

"believe whatever you want."

If someone kills you because they don't like what you believe in, then you will have every right to judge them for murder when they die.

On that day, they will be judged in your casino by your rules.

If people cannot believe what they want then this world is a 1984 Dictatorship in Hell.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:35 AM
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It's called freedom and anything else is being a gollum. Even slaves believe what they want and their thoughts are their own, and their recording of their life topples others who abused them when everyone faces the reviews.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: Profusion
Can you choose what you believe?

The first assumption which starts it all is that there is a chooser, a doer of actions.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


I hear this advice from time to time, "believe whatever you want." My understanding is that the phrase refers to basing one's beliefs on anything one wishes regardless of the facts. Is it wise to do that?


Of course it's not wise to believe whatever. Obviously. But the only alternative is to believe only what someone else tells you to believe. Is it wise to do that? Of course not.

So what are you really asking or suggesting?



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea




Of course it's not wise to believe whatever. Obviously. But the only alternative is to believe only what someone else tells you to believe. Is it wise to do that? Of course not. So what are you really asking or suggesting?


Another interesting point.

I think believing only what someone else tells us to believe isn't only zanier, it is certainly not the only alternative:

Believing your instinct and desire until reasoning challenges either is wise, wiser is to remember that reasoning, as instinct and desire, is subject to circumstance for some, and experience to others.
I have found a solid anchor in the consistent teaching of my forefathers, who disagree about a great many things and seem to agree on some fundamentals that neither my instinct, experience or reasoning have ever dented.




posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

Also, surmising before believing does a mind good.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:57 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

I've always felt a persons "belief system" is much like their opinion and is about the same as their arse hole.

Everyone is entitled to their own. It's about as personal as you can get and it really only works for them.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


I hear this advice from time to time, "believe whatever you want." My understanding is that the phrase refers to basing one's beliefs on anything one wishes regardless of the facts. Is it wise to do that?


Absolutely not. People can believe some crazy and potentially dangerous things. For example, you might believe that you can throw a cape on, jump off the roof and fly... as all too many children have done.

You should always test your beliefs by experiment. In the case of flying, you might want to start off jumping off a stool and see how that goes. Finding ways to confirm or falsify your beliefs is the kernel of the scientific method.

Of course, there are some untestable beliefs that serve an important sociological or psychological function, this is why liberal democratic societies guarantee freedom of thought and religion. A belief in God or the Space Brothers may be untestable, but if it allows you to function in society or provides emotional comfort in times of stress, then it is fulfilling its purpose.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:01 AM
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All beliefs should be questioned honestly.
Start with 'who/what' is it that believes?

Are you a person? What is a 'person'?



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: DJW001




A belief in God or the Space Brothers may be untestable, but if it allows you to function in society or provides emotional comfort in times of stress, then it is fulfilling its purpose.


Actually, belief isn't fulfilling its purpose by allowing one to function in society and/or providing any comfort at any time.
The purpose of belief includes, among other aspects, the consistency of function in and out of society.
Belief in general starts with introspection, and since the quest for meaning seems somewhat widespread, another aspect of the purpose of belief would be direction within this personal quest.
Therefore believing out of convenience is ill advised, and more so than disregard for said quest entirely, as shown by many including the snake priest mentioned in the OP, who conveniently believed that the kind of popularity stemming from this sort of showmanship is compatible with spiritual leadership based on biblical beliefs, a common stunt that has turned many away from biblical beliefs altogether despite said incompatibility.
edit on 41614v2016Thursday by wisvol because: clarification



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: wisvol


I think believing only what someone else tells us to believe isn't only zanier, it is certainly not the only alternative:


Fair enough -- I see your point.

To clarify, we believe what we do based on a variety of factors, both nature and nurture so to speak. The beauty and virtue of thinking for ourselves is that we can always change our mind and hearts, and when we know better, we do better. The opposite side of the coin, letting someone else dictate our beliefs, denies us the opportunity to know better, much less do better.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

I think you are misinterpreting the meaning behind those words or getting caught up in semantics. People that say this are usually simply speaking to the individual right to choose what is truth or enlightenment FOR THEM.

As we grow spiritually we will nearly always take another step on a long path. I was involved in mainstream religion as a youth and then that evolved to more Eastern teachings and now something very esoteric.

I would not be able to be who I am today without the experiences of yesterday and I am thankful that for the moment at least we still have the freedom to choose in America.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

No. There is a limit to the amount of absurdities one can believe. One should not believe he will stay dry by diving into water.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: Profusion
I hear this advice from time to time, "believe whatever you want." My understanding is that the phrase refers to basing one's beliefs on anything one wishes regardless of the facts. Is it wise to do that?

I think you are taking it out of context. The phrase is used by one person to inform another that they understand that they are free to believe whatever they want and that no amount of discussion between then is going to change what the other believes.

It's similar to "we'll just have to agree to disagree".



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:38 AM
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It depends upon what you are believing in.

Things like religion and God, they don't really affect anybody than yourself... unless you try to force other people to believe, or not believe (like how USSR did not encourage religion). In a perfect world, religion will remain personal.

Belief should be for intangible things.

Obviously it will be bad if you believe you can fly and then you jumped from a high building, because here your belief straightly affects the physical world with things that can be proved, unlike the spirit world where nothing can be proved.

Faith and fact are a sour couple.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Can you even choose what you wan't to believe? I don't think this is a choice we make. Our beliefs grow out of experiences we have, and so on.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Funny enough I just had the most mind F*** experience I still can't comprehend it
Yesterday I had to bail out my best mate $21000 for sexual assault on a young woman


When I asked him if it was worth it he said yes ?!? Talking about someone I trusted my life with closed eyes hands down

But general.. Who are we to judge ?!?







 
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