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The Anxiety Epidemic

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posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: ExNihiloRed

I do not find it helpful to the debate to point to people who may have it worse as a reason why something is not a problem. Slippery slope. I am also looking for real solutions, not just the peddling of prescription drugs that serve to mask the problem more than fix it.


That's only because you continue to insist the problem is real and not psychosomatic and you want to run the debate by your rules your way. Particularly if you are averse to treating these issues with drugs (I agree completely), then it behooves you to consider the total scope of the problem rather than simply start with the idea that there is an "epidemic." What if there is not? And what if you insisting that there is is part of the problem? What if your "real solution" is to stop insisting that the problem is how you define it, because I can pretty well guarantee you that if you persist on this track, those "real solutions" are going to keep eluding you.

If you study it from the perspective that this "epidemic" may be promoted by the culture, then the solution is not to fix the person, but fix the culture. IMO there are two basic issues here.

One issue is that we live in a society that likes to pretend we are all completely equal, and that any deficit in performance by an individual is a result of prejudice and discrimination, the proof of which is in the deficit in performance itself. It's self-perpetuating. So everyone gets a trophy. Everyone is a special snowflake. And everyone deserves complete and total success, and if you don't have it, you start blaming other people. We seem to have forgotten that adage by John Wayne: "Life is hard. It's harder if you're stupid." Then we claim you're not really stupid. You're an Einstein! And the reason you can't add 2 and 2 together is because of that bad man over there calling you stupid! You just had bad teachers." And when things don't work out that way and you run out of other things to blame, that sets up cognitive dissonance so we have this "anxiety epidemic" full of "Panic Attacks." Why a "Panic Attack"? No particular reason, but we gotta "fix this" regardless.

The second issue is that I believe we are set up as a species to endure a certain amount of hardship and react to "Bad Things" (tm) in an emotional way. It's simply a part of historical survival. The past has been exponentially more difficult than today's modern society. In the Western World we no longer live in constant fear for our lives. The next tribe over the hill is NOT going to raid our village, kill all the men, rape all the women, and burn down our huts. Except perhaps on the inner cities, we don't have to keep a sword by the door.

But we react to lesser things the same way. So if someone invades what we consider our personal space in traffic and "cut us off," we react as if we have been personally attacked with road rage. If our kid loses a game of Lacrosse we think unfairly, then we take off on the referee yelling and screaming. It's as if we need to express ourselves with the past emotions we needed to survive by attaching the very same emotions to things much more trivial and unnecessary. And when we do "react" the culture is now likely to punish us, so if you look cross-eyed at someone, you can be charged with assault. Now we need our "safe space" so we can feel good about ourselves. If your coffee is served "too hot" you can sue. Modern society is a bit crazy, and we use Paleolithic emotions to deal with it.

I do not believe this "epidemic" is real at all. It amounts to self-indulgence helped along by the overly empathetic who would really do the world a whole lot more good by butting out of other people's lives. This kind of behavior is not going to get you into heaven. You need to go pet a dog.
edit on 2/17/2016 by schuyler because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: schuyler




I wasn't thinking so much of paid soldiers assigned to wreak mayhem on the populace, but the populace themselves that bore the brunt of said mayhem.


Quite obviously, the soldiers seldom grow their own.

The maybe not so excessive empathy stemming from an honest and efficient doctor-patient relation helps solve wars, and therefore anxiety.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Do you think people (same percentage) suffered from this 30 years ago? 50? 100?

If so, then this is nothing new.

If not, then what has changed?



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: watchitburn

Well we learned that one of the stars you received for your post was a mistake, but you and the other 3 who agreed with you...your lack of compassion and understanding is beyond me!


There are different levels of anxiety and different reasons for why people suffer with anxiety. They do not brag and are not special snowflakes. They are real and wonderful people, some of whom you may even know, but they never let you know about it.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Just of curiosity, have you ever treated your anxiety with medication?
If so how well did it work for you?

I ask as I have a two family members whom suffer from anxiety disorders.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: NateTheAnimator
a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Just of curiosity, have you ever treated your anxiety with medication?
If so how well did it work for you?

I ask as I have a two family members whom suffer from anxiety disorders.


Yes. Medication does not get rid of anxiety from my perspective, but helped me deal with it. I am pretty much constantly uneasy, but I'm not falling into constant panic attacks either. The more symptom specific medicine (Xanax, clonazepam) definitely help curb the anxiety for a short period. If I take that too much though, it causes me more issues.

It is a real #ed up disorder and it disappoints me how ignorant some of these posts are about whether it is actually legitimate or worth addressing. I suffer from it and know it is a legit problem. Yes, it is all in my head and that's the problem.

I am still a contributing member of society, and I deal with it on the level that no one who knows me would guess I have anything wrong with me in a million years. The internal struggle is rough, though.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

I think it's something that has been around forever. We just don't talk about it.

Personally, I think 100% of people, at some time in their life, has some mental issue.

It's no different than a physical ailment. And everyone, at some time in their life, has had a physical illness.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed




Yes. Medication does not get rid of anxiety from my perspective, but helped me deal with it. I am pretty much constantly uneasy, but I'm not falling into constant panic attacks either. The more symptom specific medicine (Xanax, clonazepam) definitely help curb the anxiety for a short period. If I take that too much though, it causes me more issues. It is a real #ed up disorder and it disappoints me how ignorant some of these posts are about whether it is actually legitimate or worth addressing. I suffer from it and know it is a legit problem. Yes, it is all in my head and that's the problem. I am still a contributing member of society, and I deal with it on the level that no one who knows me would guess I have anything wrong with me in a million years. The internal struggle is rough, though.


So have you found healthier coping methods? e.g breathing techniques.

I can empathize with your struggle, it's tough sometimes when it feels like your the only one suffering from it.
I know your not asking for advice, but have you ever considered counseling? I'm not in any way insinuating that your insane, just that sometimes sharing your thoughts with someone about your daily struggles with anxiety can take the personal burden off your shoulders so to speak.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: NateTheAnimator
a reply to: ExNihiloRed




Yes. Medication does not get rid of anxiety from my perspective, but helped me deal with it. I am pretty much constantly uneasy, but I'm not falling into constant panic attacks either. The more symptom specific medicine (Xanax, clonazepam) definitely help curb the anxiety for a short period. If I take that too much though, it causes me more issues. It is a real #ed up disorder and it disappoints me how ignorant some of these posts are about whether it is actually legitimate or worth addressing. I suffer from it and know it is a legit problem. Yes, it is all in my head and that's the problem. I am still a contributing member of society, and I deal with it on the level that no one who knows me would guess I have anything wrong with me in a million years. The internal struggle is rough, though.


So have you found healthier coping methods? e.g breathing techniques.

I can empathize with your struggle, it's tough sometimes when it feels like your the only one suffering from it.
I know your not asking for advice, but have you ever considered counseling? I'm not in any way insinuating that your insane, just that sometimes sharing your thoughts with someone about your daily struggles with anxiety can take the personal burden off your shoulders so to speak.


I've tried a bunch of things, but everything is symptom-oriented and not a "cure." I obviously want it to go away forever, but once your brain changes to recognize anxiety and once you have a panic attack, the fear of having one will change you. It is self perpetuating. Ever try to not think about something? Your brain immediate acts like your worst enemy and thinks about it. That's anxiety. Being distracted helps.

I have considered counseling (and in the past tried it).
edit on 17-2-2016 by ExNihiloRed because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed




I've tried a bunch of things, but everything is symptom-oriented and not a "cure." I obviously want it to go away forever, but once your brain changes to recognize anxiety and once you have a panic attack, the fear of having one will change you. It is self perpetuating. Ever try to not think about something? Your brain immediate acts like your worst enemy and thinks about it. That's anxiety. Being distracted helps. I have considered counseling (and in the past tried it).


Counseling isn't for everyone, I'm glad you at least gave it a shot. Many don't, due to the stigma behind the misconceptions about the variety of purposes counseling has in mental health.
You should give it another go, perhaps later in life.

I wish all the best to you ExNihiloRed. Anxiety is a real bitch to deal with.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 01:08 AM
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Most of my own investigations as to why someone is anxious stems directly from economics... and it has become noticeably worse as the economic climate grows colder.

Living with the knowledge of one's death doesn't make for cozy times, either, but when it comes down to deep existential angst, economics and visions of streets and starvation are foremost in folk's minds... lately especially.

One can see that reflected in the folks who worked hard and went to college and even got advanced degrees and are now basically flipping burgers but with debt that will prevent them from any hopes of a future security.

For example, see the latest voting trends...



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: ExNihiloRed

Anxiety can be caused by many things and a common one in our modern world is EM radiation from all of our power cables and electronic devices. With so many people tied to their phones and other electronic life lines it is small wonder that this is reaching epidemic proportions.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 12:18 PM
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Here's an interesting alternative treatment that shows promise, fecal transplant.

Source: www.healthygutbugs.com...

There is a well-known connection between the brain and the gut. The trillions of bacteria living in a person’s gut (gut microbiome) can communicate directly with the brain via the Vagus Nerve that connects them. Bacteria can also communicate with the brain via the enteric nervous system, the nervous system of the digestive track. Believe it or not, there are actually more neurons wrapped around the gut than there are in the spinal cord.

We are starting to find out that gut bugs can communicate with the brain, scientists say, both by modulating the immune system and by actually producing neurochemicals. Scientists have been aware for some time that about 50% of the neurochemicals in our bodies arise from the gut, but are now taking a close look at the role that microbes play in their production. Some of the neurochemicals produced by our the microbes in our digestive tract are the same neurochemicals that are used by our neurons to communicate and affect mood including dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mark Lyte, a researcher at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center who studies the effect that microbes can have on the endocrine systems (the body system of the endocrine glands and the hormones they produce) says, “I’m actually seeing new neurochemicals that have not been described before being produced by certain bacteria. These bacteria are, in effect, mind-altering microorganisms.” This special class of microbes is known are psychobiotics.

Through this communication from the gut to the brain, the gut bugs can affect behavior and mood. Maybe those folks who coined the expression “gut feeling” were actually on to something! Recent research supports the theory that disturbances in the gut microbiome, or the combination of microbes living in a particular person’s gut, can play a role in some psychopathology such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and even autism.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: seentoomuch
Here's an interesting alternative treatment that shows promise, fecal transplant.

Source: www.healthygutbugs.com...

There is a well-known connection between the brain and the gut. The trillions of bacteria living in a person’s gut (gut microbiome) can communicate directly with the brain via the Vagus Nerve that connects them. Bacteria can also communicate with the brain via the enteric nervous system, the nervous system of the digestive track. Believe it or not, there are actually more neurons wrapped around the gut than there are in the spinal cord.

We are starting to find out that gut bugs can communicate with the brain, scientists say, both by modulating the immune system and by actually producing neurochemicals. Scientists have been aware for some time that about 50% of the neurochemicals in our bodies arise from the gut, but are now taking a close look at the role that microbes play in their production. Some of the neurochemicals produced by our the microbes in our digestive tract are the same neurochemicals that are used by our neurons to communicate and affect mood including dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mark Lyte, a researcher at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center who studies the effect that microbes can have on the endocrine systems (the body system of the endocrine glands and the hormones they produce) says, “I’m actually seeing new neurochemicals that have not been described before being produced by certain bacteria. These bacteria are, in effect, mind-altering microorganisms.” This special class of microbes is known are psychobiotics.

Through this communication from the gut to the brain, the gut bugs can affect behavior and mood. Maybe those folks who coined the expression “gut feeling” were actually on to something! Recent research supports the theory that disturbances in the gut microbiome, or the combination of microbes living in a particular person’s gut, can play a role in some psychopathology such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and even autism.


The research is interesting, notwithstanding your comment. There is a lot of study going into the effect of gut microbes on a variety of human functions, including those of the brain. It is pretty fascinating research (although I don't necessary think you need to swap #).



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 03:42 PM
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Anxiety is caused by not realizing what actually is.
The mind spends time in time - thoughts about what happened and thoughts about what will happen and how to make it all work are going on inside the head. You cannot do anything in time - because you are here now.
Recognize that what is not happening is not happening and notice that what is happening is always happening.

The mind creates time and space for all sorts of dramas and horrors to happen in - which are not really happening - the body feels the fear that the mind makes up.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: ExNihiloRed

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ExNihiloRed


The stigma around mental health issues needs to be lifted and people need to focus on solutions that work.

Howabout derailing the terror train of propaganda on TV?

When someone(s) gets shot or a bomb goes of killing civilians somewhere they splash it over and over, as long as a gun or Islam can be blamed, they never shut up . How fearful does all that make everyone?

After that they can stop the endless wars overseas and the endless debt at home. They can stop stealing peoples land, polluting the environment, our water, air, food… stop sending jobs overseas, pay a decent wage so people can pay their bills…

geez, its easy really.


I guess this is one form of anxiety, but a bit more specific than the generalized anxiety disorder I am referencing.

Generally speaking, I know where my anxiety is coming from. I can trace that feeling back by thinking of things 'that are bothering me'. Difference is I think, I can let worry go, I can resolve the conflict within, if not, at least not feed it to 'anxiety' levels, whatever that means.



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 03:12 PM
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Yes! Finally someone talking about anxiety and how crippling it is! The stigma behind mental illnesses really does need to stop. Anxiety disorders are more than being 'afraid' of something. It is a debilitating illness that swallows you up and spits you out cold. Fighting the stigma is extremely difficult. Love your post!



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 03:41 AM
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It's the new norm.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: ExNihiloRed

I do not find it helpful to the debate to point to people who may have it worse as a reason why something is not a problem. Slippery slope. I am also looking for real solutions, not just the peddling of prescription drugs that serve to mask the problem more than fix it.


I do not believe this "epidemic" is real at all. It amounts to self-indulgence helped along by the overly empathetic who would really do the world a whole lot more good by butting out of other people's lives. This kind of behavior is not going to get you into heaven. You need to go pet a dog.


You are part of the problem! How can you sneer at those with anxiety if you do not understand the problem, or more specifically their problem?

Anxiety is a mental disorder. How many forms of anxiety do you think there are? One? Do you think everyone is just looking over their shoulders? What do you think anxiety is? Do you think we turn on the TV, see gunfire and fall helplessly behind the sofa?

I suffer from health anxiety which manifested from PTSD after I nearly died on the operating table during a routine operation, was hospitalized for 2 months, fed via intravenous tube (vein to heart) as digestive system was paralyzed and had to be operated on awake to rectify the subsequent trauma without the need for more anesthetic and I was already recovering from high doses and morphine.

When you're high on life, no health issues at all, 22 years old, a touch of appendicitis strikes you out of nowhere and you get medevaced to your home country with an ambulance waiting on the runway and the surgeon proceeds as described above and nearly kills you, it kind of hits you in a way you wouldn't expect. Do you understand?

Following my recovery I felt mentally stable (I didn't feel anxious in the classical sense), what I couldn't understand was the health issues I was having. One after the other, after the other. It went on for years. I had multiple MRI scans, CT scans, endoscope examinations, blood tests, physio, nothing worked and the symptoms were real. Nothing would get rid of the back aches, the heartburn, the choking on food (needed the heimlich twice!), the skin problems, the sickness, and I stress I did not feel anxious. The strange thing is after every procedure to investigate the potential root cause for any symptom I had, the symptoms were almost immediately alleviated.

After a few years the real anxiety symptoms kicked in, out of nowhere, I had nothing to be anxious about. I had heart palpitations, difficulty sleeping, feeling faint, that feeling of doom. Why was I having this? I didn't understand.

You guessed it, health anxiety due to post traumatic stress disorder following the incident years prior. Guess what? I didn't even see it coming. I don't want to suffer from this! I don't wake up in the morning and begin to worry, that's not how my anxiety works. My diet is brilliant, I work out a lot; I must cycle 90 miles a week, I am successful at work and I have a young family to care for. My anxiety is there whether I like it or not and I now have a way to deal with it, medication! (I can see that look on your face as I'm typing this and it's pathetic).

Whether you like it or not anxiety is very real, it's sneaky, it's problematic, it's difficult to diagnose and it's even more difficult to treat. It's a mental disorder, not a trendy fad.



posted on Mar, 16 2016 @ 08:08 AM
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Its clear to me by reading some of these posts that many people are truly ignorant of this.

I have been having horrible anxiety and panic attacks in the last year or so. I can't describe how scary it is to have no control over your mind. Its like you are in the grip of a totally irrational fear that snowballs on itself. Its horrible.

Sometimes I notice if I feel one starting to creep up my spine, hugging myself tight as I can helps me breathe better for some reason.

And its not because I'm a p--sy, its not becasue I'm weak, its not because I'm a softie at all. I wish I knew why this is happening and above all, I wish I could just make it stop.

Thanks for bringing some much needed attention to this OP. I hope you find peace.
edit on 16-3-2016 by Cancerwarrior because: (no reason given)



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