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An Ancient Pyramid In Spain?

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posted on Feb, 16 2016 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Kantjil

I can't make sense of what you just said, sorry.

But maybe there is something in that hill! lol.




posted on Feb, 16 2016 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: geezlouise

No trees, kinda gives a clue



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 01:22 AM
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a reply to: geezlouise

If you look at the pictures, it actually does have trees, just not many. From the pictures, the area seems pretty dry, and all the pictures show that trees, while kind of abundant off in the distance, seem to deliberately planted in the areas near the hill. I do notice a lot of shrubbery, and dead grass. So... my conclusion is gonna have to be because it's not situated in an area that is dense in trees the begin with.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 01:51 AM
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Its only a thought but surely if you have pyramids sited in Egypt and even more in Guatemala thene3 why shouldn't there be pyramids in countries in-between these two main sites.

People travelled, especially the Spanish by sea so would have seen these buildings and probably emanated them. Nothing stopped people seeing these structures and actually asking how they were built or even seeing them in construction, especially in South America. There are earth pyramids all over the place as the article says, one even at Silbury Hill in England.

Why such a mystery and why such denial of something that is interesting and fascinating about our past yet seems to scare the hell out of people in case they have to consider pyramids were in building vogue at a certain period in our development pretty much around the world? What is intriguing is the way these buildings were orientated to the cosmos and how the builders managed to be so accurate.

world-pyramids.com...-lh39A



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 02:13 AM
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originally posted by: stinkelbaum
nice hill.
reminds me of that fraudster in bosnia, charging people to dig into a hill he claims is a pyramid.

Yeah that one in Bosnia was rather not a pyramid but a hill that has a shape of a pyramid. The reason that Bosnian town claimed it was a pyramid.

They needed a tourism boost. Before the Balkan wars that town was somewhat of a popular destitution site for tourists, now that town is losing its tourism value.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian
gps reference please.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: Shiloh7
Its only a thought but surely if you have pyramids sited in Egypt and even more in Guatemala thene3 why shouldn't there be pyramids in countries in-between these two main sites.

People travelled, especially the Spanish by sea so would have seen these buildings and probably emanated them. Nothing stopped people seeing these structures and actually asking how they were built or even seeing them in construction, especially in South America. There are earth pyramids all over the place as the article says, one even at Silbury Hill in England.

Why such a mystery and why such denial of something that is interesting and fascinating about our past yet seems to scare the hell out of people in case they have to consider pyramids were in building vogue at a certain period in our development pretty much around the world? What is intriguing is the way these buildings were orientated to the cosmos and how the builders managed to be so accurate.

world-pyramids.com...-lh39A


Because that shape is ridiculously easy to build..



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: acrux

Found it thanks to a picture on this blog post which showed its orientation relative to Cañete.

40° 1'4.01"N, 1°39'19.86"W



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian
thank you



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 08:43 PM
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originally posted by: TaleDawn

originally posted by: stinkelbaum
nice hill.
reminds me of that fraudster in bosnia, charging people to dig into a hill he claims is a pyramid.

Yeah that one in Bosnia was rather not a pyramid but a hill that has a shape of a pyramid. The reason that Bosnian town claimed it was a pyramid.

They needed a tourism boost. Before the Balkan wars that town was somewhat of a popular destitution site for tourists, now that town is losing its tourism value.


Well it did not quite work tourist wise because all or most of the main stream archaeologists are made to think like you seem to think that pyramids only exist in Egypt they will not be financed if stating otherwise.. not claiming that the Bosnian call is 100 % but it is sure interesting to some and one day we might be surprised. I will refresh when I have paid a visit, fate willing..

edit on 17 2 2016 by skywatcher44 because: Added



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 08:54 PM
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originally posted by: skywatcher44


Well it did not quite work tourist wise because all or most of the main stream archaeologists are made to think like you seem to think that pyramids only exist in Egypt they will not be financed if stating otherwise..


I'm sorry, but I can't let you get away with that blatant mistruth.
What on earth makes you say that?
Could you please explain yourself, providing factual evidence rather than opinion?

Thank you.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 09:18 PM
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i see a rock.

someone had to say it.

EDIT: You're welcome.

edit on 17-2-2016 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 09:24 PM
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I did find satellite views of it; when seen in context, it's a part of the nearby ancient mountain range.

It's just off the 420, about a half mile south of a hotel located at "Camino Chorreadero s/n, 16300, Cañete (Cuenca)" (sorry, I haven't installed Google Earth yet. It's clearly a natural structure and from above you can see that there's no regular course of stones here. The layers are very irregular.

Geologic features of the same height with various shapes are located all over that province.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Now Byrd why did you build pyramids, arent you one of those, self taught Indiana Jones type of guys? with no education



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 03:03 AM
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originally posted by: Kantjil
a reply to: Byrd

Now Byrd why did you build pyramids, arent you one of those, self taught Indiana Jones type of guys? with no education


You do realize that Byrd has more extensive formal education than half the members here put together, right? Smh



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

I do to in psychology, I watched many movies and played many video games... Or maybe ? It's a passion? Trying to figure out the difference



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Kapriti
a reply to: theantediluvian



There are also the inexplicable figurines and statuary like La Dama de Elche that in spite of what one reads on Wikipedia, no one really knows what culture produced these images of "the Lady" and whether or not they have anything to do with Phoenicians, Greeks, or the goddess Tanith.



The Lady does have some antecedence in other cultures in the Med.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
Why aren't there any trees growing on that hill?


It's a safe bet that the soil is mostly rocky. If the soil could support trees etc, they would be there. Otherwise, to be treeless etc would require regular active removal.

The looser soil eroded, probably mostly from rain, and probably a long long time ago. The harder materials remained. Thus, very little is growing on the hill.

Soil erosion can be a negative feedback loop. Plant roots prevent soil erosion. The less soil, the less plant life it can support, the more easily erosion will wash away soil. Some plants are even particularly good at building up the soil and can halt or even 'reverse' erosion(i.e. net soil gain over time); any similar old hill like that in the region which happens to have a lot of plant life probably is significantly covered in plants known to resist erosion well and build up the soil.

It's also possible, given that the site was used by humans as a lookout/fortification, that they destroyed the plant life entirely or simply enough to disrupt the natural balance, leading to the rapid erosion of soil, rendering the hill rocky/barren/etc for the long term.


originally posted by: Shiloh7
Its only a thought but surely if you have pyramids sited in Egypt and even more in Guatemala thene3 why shouldn't there be pyramids in countries in-between these two main sites.


I think it's a very simple sort of issue. You don't need to build a hill where there are already other hills nearby. Or, why would you? Mostly, you wouldn't. I can't even come up with one other than stuff that is 'close but not really the same thing' like building a little hill on top of a big one.

Look at them in the jungle in Guatemala etc: see how they give a commanding view of a large area where none would have existed otherwise? The flat top structures are to large extent about the view they create, whether it's looking out over the landscape, or looking up at the top of it like it's a stage for performance. Of course, that's all one more reason why the pointy topped, proper pyramids are all the more mysterious.

So of course you'd be more likely to find hills with extensive landscaping rather than completely human made hills.
edit on 18-2-2016 by 11andrew34 because: clarification

edit on 18-2-2016 by 11andrew34 because: clarification



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian




and something else that wasn't quite clear from the translation ("account of a trinket")


"Cuenta de abalorio" in this context means something like a bead or decorative item.



posted on Feb, 18 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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Haven't had a chance to check it out yet, but I have spoken with a mate of mine who's pretty knowledgeable when it comes to local history. He tells me there's a good chance it's a celtibero fort from maybe around 300 BC. Apparently these guys liked to fortify hilltops. There's actually 3 celtibero villages that have never been excavated in about a 3 km radius from where I'm sitting, all built on hilltops. You can even find pottery shards scattered around on the ground. Seems there are so many of these villages, there's just not enough time or archaeologists to excavate them all.



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