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What Do YOU have in your...???

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posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 05:57 PM
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What do you have in your car kit / get home bag (or whatever you call it)?

It's wintertime (in the northern hemisphere anyway), but all are welcome to join in. Sometimes this seems like a touchy subject; people who are prepared are called "doomsday preppers", "survivalists" and all manner of other less than complimentary names. Do I carry such a bag? Yes, I do. I grew up in Wyoming and Alaska; if you didn't, you were just simply foolish. The World didn't have to come to an end to need it, it could be something as simple as your truck/car breaking down or getting stuck in a storm.

Preparedness, under those circumstances, is considered practical, but to many (from other places) not so much. I've often wondered why such preparations aren't "okay" if one lives in a big city (say, NYC, BWI, BUF, etc.). One could just as easily be stranded on a major highway within very short distances of a city center and still need to survive for a day or so. Why be cold, why be uncomfortable or at risk?

I call my car bag my "get home bag" because that's what my primary mission is; I'm going home. I don't care if it's just a storm, SHTF, the Apocalypse or the fictitious "zombie apocalypse" (which will never happen).

The other night I took everything out of my bag and took stock of it. I do this 3-4 times per year. As the seasons change, one needs different items, and some items need to be replaced for others.

So, as not to yammer on; here's what I generally have in my bag for the winter season....

- Poncho
- First Aid Kit (significant)
- (2) multi-tools
- Fleece blanket
- Sweater
- Beanie cap
- HD (contractor grade) 55 gal garbage sack
- 5x7 tarp
- (3) knives, (2) heavy folders and (1) HD Mora
- Parang
- Frisbee
- Eat-n-tool
- Fire kit
- (2) pair gloves
- (2) head lamps
- (2) small tool kits (which also include medical bandages and small tools).
- wipes (antibacterial)
- 100' of 550 cord
- (5) climbing rated carabiners
- Cook cup (w/ soup & instant oatmeal)
- 1 Ltr. Bottle
- Canteen cup (for 1L bottle)
- Rite in Rain pad
- small pistol (.38)
- Reflective vest
- (2) space blankets
- lighters
- ranger bands
- krypton light
- Neosporin antiseptic (straws)
- Tylenol tabs
- Anti-diarrheal tabs
- medical tape
- medical scissors
- sports tape
- ace bandages
- hand spade

The above is all in a pack, which can be carried away from my vehicle if need be. In my car, aside from the usual spare tire, jack, etc., I also carry a set of heavy duty jumper cables and a HD nylon tug-strap.

My mentality is never to hurt anyone, but to get home...no matter how long it takes. Given where I live (in the country) this can be quite a journey, but my safest, most secure, base of operations is home (with my family).

Hopefully, others will be interested in posting their similar preparations or comments.

Best, FCD.





edit on 2/14/2016 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I didn't see kitty-litter in your list.

I always keep a bag in my car. It adds that extra bit of traction when you get stuck somewhere.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:13 PM
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are you insane?



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Have you considered trading the fleece blanket for a wool blanket?
Wool will keep you warm even if it gets wet.

ETA: I don't see any reason to believe that you are insane from what you posted in the OP.
edit on b000000292016-02-14T18:18:17-06:0006America/ChicagoSun, 14 Feb 2016 18:18:17 -0600600000016 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Candles along with metal can. Toilet paper. Flare gun. Glow sticks. Ground flares, a small hatchet. Also a small saw. Compass forgot compass.





edit on 14-2-2016 by Tarzan the apeman. because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I didn't see kitty-litter in your list.

I always keep a bag in my car. It adds that extra bit of traction when you get stuck somewhere.


Ahh the cheap alternative to Grit, there are many a frustrated cat owner come bad weather in the local supermarkets over here in the UK especially in semi rural areas as so many have cottoned onto that idea, the cat litter is actually cheaper than the bag's of Grit, supply and demand probably but it is still funny, an alternative is to pack a couple of old wicker or straw window blind's to throw down as mat's for your tyres to grip, always throw a few down on top of one another, also if you get really stuck and they are not strong enough consider using your car mat's though you will have to replace them of course.


Flyingclaydisc, Just read down and that is an extensive safety package and a good one, I do not know how far out in the country you live but even in a town come winter a proper shovel not just a trenching shovel is a good idea if your car can fit it as the longer handle (assuming it is a good one) can provide leaverage as well and also allow you to dig out of that snow more effectively, of course over here in blighty we could not legally carry a gun but no one said anything was wrong with having a few emergency flares.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: Rikku
are you insane?


I believe it's called, "being prudent."



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

Oh, I forgot...I also have...

- glow sticks (green and orange)
- Compass (along with sealed maps of my area for 75 miles)

And, the Parang covers all the 'axe / hatchet' functions and many more.




edit on 2/14/2016 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Yes, I have. I had the fleece and it's compact. I generally wear wool in the winter, but wool is heavy to carry. I need two days tops to get to where I'm going. The fleece is more for others, not me.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767




a proper shovel not just a trenching shovel is a good idea


Hence the Frisbee. Many do not know how versatile a Frisbee truly is. It serves as many as (5) functions, not the least of which is moving a lot of snow, mud or dirt, but takes up virtually no room. It has far more important functions also; things like...

- keeping medical supplies dry / clean while administering emergency first aid (mud, snow and dirt...even water)
- carrying water
- serving as a plate
- holding small parts (such as those from a pistol or rifle while field stripping out in a field or forest).

...and many more.






edit on 2/14/2016 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:35 PM
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This is my weekend survival kit.
A bottle of black Sambuca and a car blind so the morning sun doesn't wake me.
I think there is a spare tyre somewhere too...




posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:37 PM
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I can't remember. Probably a flat spare tire and a broken jack
edit on 14-2-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: Rikku
are you insane?



No.

I'd like to think I'm the guy who just might want someone like you to LIVE in an emergency, no matter how large or small.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Don't forget to add signal mirror, pen flare gun, some hand warmers (you can't start a fire with frozen fingers). solar powered, crank charge am fm radio with weather alert bands,

Garote saw, or folding wood saw, and (damn) some antibiotic soap.

Augment ammo with .38 shot shells and add some more variety to food store like granola bars or some MRE style rations. You can't always heat food.

Oh and spare socks. Protect your feet.

If additionally able to carry it all in a shoulder pack (with soft shoulder pads)and a sleeping bag. Hollow fill polyester that draws up over the head. Not down, down takes forever to dry and mushes flat under you.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
why not just have some snowchains or snowboots and then just drive home?



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: Rikku

Chains are awesome, better than 4x4 in most cases (and all my vehicles are 4x4), but sometimes you get separated from your vehicle and you have to be prepared for this.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I'd carry a .45, but it's heavier than the .38. I'm not expecting to use the .38 really at all, unless extreme circumstances present themselves. Again, my circumstances are roughly ~48 hours max to get home. Then...it's a much different scenario if danger is around (but most likely just to relax then).



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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My cell phone to call AAA or somebody to come and get me. : )



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:50 PM
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Living in the great white north, I practically carry the kitchen sink in the back of my SUV the minute the leaves start falling off the trees:

- shovel, small axe
- booster cables
- extra bottle of windshield de-icer
- a bag of Ice Melt salt crystals
- small bag of kitty litter
- 4 emergency candles w/ waterproof matches
- ziploc bag w/ beef jerky and hard candies
- 2 bottled waters
- small first-aid kit
- roll of TP
- tow chain
- winter boots, wool socks, ski pants, wool sweater, toque/balaklava, mitts, scarf
- wool blanket
- cigarette lighter adapter/charger
- emergency flares
- small toolbox with various tools including a few different types of knives
- small camping cookpot and cup

Here in the rural countryside, you just never know how long it will be before you see another vehicle pass by, should you end up in the ditch along the highway.

Stopping to see if someone on the side of the road needs help is pretty much an unwritten rule around these parts.




posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 06:59 PM
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I spend a lot of time in the deep backcountry so I carry a lot more gear than most probably do. I built a tool rack for my Toyota 4/WD similar to the pioneer rack on a military HUMMER. On the rack I have a 4/way lug wrench, shovel, mattock, axe, 50' steel tow cable, 50' rope, pry bar, jumper cables, and two 5 gallon fuel cans. All held in place with bungee cords.

In the cab I always have water, hand tools, fishing gear, flashlight, machete, dry clothing, rain gear, a rifle AR-15 with ammo, and my survival bag.

The bag contains a folding knife, 2 flares, rum, a good first aid kit, spare glasses, parachute cord, power bars, two more flash lights, my .45 auto pistol, spare ammo, and two lighters.

This sounds like a lot of equipment but it fits nicely on the rack and I have complete confidence in getting to and from my destination, in any weather.




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