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Safer Cement For Nuclear Waste

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posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 08:14 AM
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www.theguardian.com...


British scientists are designing a revolutionary cement that could withstand the impact of intense radiation for thousands of years. The project could prove vital in dealing with the challenges of Britain’s proposed expansion of its nuclear industry.

. . .

“To work out how materials – in this case cement – are going to behave for tens of thousands of years is quite mind-boggling, but that is exactly what we are now doing,” said the project’s leader, Claire Corkhill of Sheffield University. She is due to present details of the project at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington on Sunday.

The key to her team’s project is the UK’s Diamond Light Source, near Oxford. The facility accelerates electrons almost to the speed of light, so that they give off a light 10 billion times brighter than the sun. These bright beams are then directed off into laboratories, where they are used to study the properties of many different types of material: ice, viruses, cancer drugs – and cement.

. . .

From this work, the group has designed a new form of cement which could then be used to cover nuclear waste inside underground stores. “That cement will be able to capture all of the radioactive elements that might be released from the waste over time,” added Corkhill. “Cements that are currently in use do not do this. Our cement will therefore make nuclear waste disposal even safer.”




Blast furnace slag is an ingredient.

Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) from S#horpe Steelworks was supplied by Hanson Cements according to the established specifications of Sellafield Limited for use in the UK nuclear industry
www.sciencedirect.com...



Cementitious water affects vitrified high level waste.

State-of-the-art determination of nuclear waste glass durability in geological disposal environments.
This research focuses on understanding the durability and radioactive element release from vitrified nuclear waste forms. Research to date has focused on determining the role of cementitious pore water on the dissolution rate and subsequent alteration layer formation of simulant UK high level waste (HLW) glass.
www.sheffield.ac.uk...


With high level and intermediate level waste in adjacent repositories, cementitious water will come into contact with vitrified high level waste.

In the ILW “zone,” drums containing waste encapsulated in cement will be emplaced and backfilled with a cementitious grout.2 Due to its high porosity and permeability, when water infiltrates the GDF, the cement grout will quickly become saturated with groundwater. As a result, Ca(OH)2 in the grout will dissolve creating high-pH conditions (pH 10–12), with the aim of limiting the solubility of radionuclide species and releasing high concentrations of Ca into the GDF groundwaters.3 Because the flow of this Ca-rich, hyperalkaline water from the ILW “zone” to the HLW “zone”
of the colocated repository cannot be precluded, it is important to understand the dissolution behavior of HLW glass under conditions that simulate this colocated repository, using a simplified model system
eprints.whiterose.ac.uk...

Let's hope the owl pendant she wears represents wisdom and not allegiance to some death cult.




We will forget, after it's buried. We've forgotten what this is. www.stone-circles.org.uk... When it was put into place the need was so well recognised that huge efforts were made to shape it, transport it, and place it upright. Excavation suggests there's the same length underground as above. Yet after a scant few thousand years we have forgotten why all the effort was made.

We will forget what the nuclear waste repositories are. They have to be secure.
edit on 14 2 2016 by Kester because: paragraphs




posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 08:35 AM
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It's great that we have the technology to contain radiation.

Let's hope and maybe make sure the people in charge of this have our best interests at heart.
edit on 03801v2016Sunday by wisvol because: indulged in sarcasm, corrected it



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: Kester

The most corrosive thing in the world is an unstable atom.

Nuclear waste is impossible to contain forever, it will eat its way through anything, eventually.

Because its decay path in most cases is longer than the archeological record.

Take an atom of Plutonium 239, for instance. This unstable 'element' has a 'half life' of 24000 years. Say it vents out of a nuclear melt down somewhere… (hint hint).

Prevailing winds carry it aloft, dumping it into the ocean where it sinks to the bottom, laying there for a thousand years until a bottom feeder ingests it, which is eaten by bigger and bigger fish until its consumed by a person at dinner time, who contracts cancer and dies from the radioactive bombardment of cells, who is buried and rots in the ground for another thousand years, whereupon a river erodes the old grave yard, carrying the atom to the ocean where it evaporates into a cloud and rains down on a redwood tree forest, becoming absorbed by a saplings roots, staying with the tree until it dies a thousand years later, becomes fossilized in rock and eventually is washed back to the river and out to sea and sinks to the bottom, again and again… and again…

Thats about 10,000 years, I think. The PU atom is still only about halfway through its initial half life, emitting harmful beta radiation to any life form that happens to ingest it.

Radioactive waste, the gift that keeps on giving.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 08:41 AM
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It would be nice to be able to transport the waste away to keep I safe. The plant at Big Rock Point has been gone for years but the waste is still stored nearby. Thanks to president Carter




posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: wisvol

Shortly after I wrote this www.abovetopsecret.com... they dropped the DCIC's. At a saving to the taxpayer of £200 million.

Why would they want to spend an extra £200 million on a system that is very obviously vulnerable to simple terrorist attack?

They were packing this stuff into cast iron containers.

FED mainly consists of parts of the magnesium alloy cladding that surrounds nuclear fuel, which, at some sites, was removed before the used fuel was sent for reprocessing. Some FED remains at sites and needs to be safely retrieved, treated and stored.

magnoxsites.com...

A simple thermite device attached to the top of a cast iron containers full of this stuff would create a roman candle effect. Magnesium alloy, how's that going to burn? And having been in close contact with the fuel rods, how much radioactive material would be spread throughout the storage sheds and out into the open?



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Good point.

There's a cartoon where one character says something along the lines of

"hey guys, let's be the only nation ever to unleash nuclear weapons of mass destruction on Japan's civilian population, because Germany started a world wide war again. Then for a minute we can get our supplies from pretty much every country not wanting to get nuked. Also, we'll blame random countries (usually Israel's neighbors) with having or preparing nuclear weapons even though nobody else who does own them has used them ever except us. This way, we play the jews against the muslims just like we play the blacks against the white down here."

And that cartoon also said something about Fukushima.

To be more specific:




Magnesium alloy, how's that going to burn? And having been in close contact with the fuel rods, how much radioactive material would be spread throughout the storage sheds and out into the open?


Metallurgy says most alloys will melt before they burn, and way too much radioactive material would & c. because that stuff is buried in the mountains of Africa (the place where there is still wild lions) for a reason.
Not meant to be "in the open". Hey Manhattan project, let's make them Axis capitulate yea?

Oy.

song about this

Also, the cartoon is an allegory for the US government of that day.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Kester

There has been significant work on materials for handling dangerous actinides.

Synroc was one that I first came across at the Lucas Heights reactor.

As I understand it, the Hot Isostatic Compression technique used by Synroc is now the preferred process for long term storage of atomic wastes and toxins.



posted on Feb, 15 2016 @ 01:37 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Fascinating. And the Atomic Energy Commission were responsible for the development of the process, though originally for making fuel elements.

The development originated early in 1955 when the Atomic Energy Commission issued a challenge to researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute’s Columbus Laboratories in Columbus, Ohio. The challenge was simple: develop a process to bond components of small Zircaloy-clad pin-type nuclear fuel elements while maintaining strict dimensional control.
www.asme.org...



posted on Feb, 15 2016 @ 01:53 AM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: chr0naut

Fascinating. And the Atomic Energy Commission were responsible for the development of the process, though originally for making fuel elements.

The development originated early in 1955 when the Atomic Energy Commission issued a challenge to researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute’s Columbus Laboratories in Columbus, Ohio. The challenge was simple: develop a process to bond components of small Zircaloy-clad pin-type nuclear fuel elements while maintaining strict dimensional control.
www.asme.org...


Yeah, I only knew of the Aussie side of things. Thanks for the link!



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