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"Friday Night Tykes" Reality youth American Football show. Could this be considered Child Abuse?

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posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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Hello all,

I was watching casual Television when I saw a commercial for Friday Night Tykes. Apparently it is the latest silly reality T.V. and boy I understand why the show MARKETS ITSELF as "Americas most controversial show."

*barf*

Granted ive never seen an episode, but from just yt clips and trailers (posted below) its not hard to grasp the concept. So basically the show revolves around super highly competitive youth football. A Texas league that is the equivalent to the NFL for kids 8 and 9 year olds. These kids are driven to their breaking point and extremely pressured to perform. Parents fight and gossip about finding the next "NFL prodigy." yikes.

I understand the supporters, if any. I played competitive youth Ice Hockey at the National level and knew what it meant to be competitive. I know what it means to drive and grind at a sport, especially with contact involved. As young athletes we were tough and hard, and ruthless on the ice. Just like these kids. I just think what goes on in practice on and off the field, and along with the parents hostility, this is possible abuse to the children. Just a thought. Then again, I'd hate to be going soft.

Ill post the trailer first for those who I hope have never heard of the show. Followed by articles.

Trailer (2:59) -- Link: www.youtube.com...



USA Today article: ftw.usatoday.com...



Colby Connell needed to puke.

It was hot out, the sweat soaking through his uniform, and Colby was fighting back tears. Coaches tried to talk him through it, but there was no fighting it. He yanked out his mouth guard and vomited on the sideline.

Colby’s team had just finished their first hitting drills of the season. It was 99 degrees under the hot Texas sun. His coach was unsympathetic.

“Blow chunks,” the coach said. “Blow chunks and then we’re going to go.”

The young football player nodded and tried to stand upright as the vomit continued to fly out. The coaches continued to yell.

Colby is one of the children being followed on the new docu-series “Friday Night Tykes,” which highlights different stories from the Texas Youth Football League.

Colby Connell is 8-years-old.


My main worries are the toll this environment takes on young children. Let alone being reality T.V. stars. I really should've seen an episode before posting, but banking off the fact that none of us watch it. Be surprised if I step on any toes.




posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: frostie

Meanwhile we flip the station and there are the pretty little girls wearing lipstick and eye liner and all dressed up like street walkers just a primping and posturing and sashaying and gyrating around the stage in order to win the Little Priincess title.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 12:08 AM
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I saw it, and me and my family all said something about it!

I think that getting to the point in CHILDREN'S sports where ADULTS are discussing others wanting to make sure a kid gets hurt to keep him out for the season, it needs to be permanently shut down.

Though, I live in an area where sports = life or whatever, and I have seen and heard parents act like idiots.

It is the parents...and I feel sorry for the kids! Most will end up hating an activity they might have really liked and been great at!

Same as the parents who push kids in academics or music too. It gets ugly, fast.
edit on 14-2-2016 by BarefootInWinter because: Spelling



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 12:52 AM
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Sorry. I don't see where you're coming from on this. Its the same as little girls in pagents trying to look like Barbie. How is this any different? Its competitive sports. Give me a break. Its not like its YMCA or anything. Parents and kids know what they are siging up for. It's not an lesirouly activity. Its contact sports and competing. Whoopty do. Don't watch it.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: frostie

I'm sorry, this doesn't seem any different than how people already are when it comes to sports and their kids, except now you're just seeing it on tv. Parents have always been this way when it comes to sports(especially football) and their kids. The town I grew up in was really bad about it.

I'm really not a fan of most sports, and mainly because of it's fans. This show only shows me what I've already known about many football fans. Now I guess the people who didn't grow up around it will finally see how sad people's obsessions can be. /shrug



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: GroidNificent

From the OP if you missed it,



I understand the supporters, if any. I played competitive youth Ice Hockey at the National level and knew what it meant to be competitive. I know what it means to drive and grind at a sport, especially with contact involved. As young athletes we were tough and hard, and ruthless on the ice. Just like these kids. I just think what goes on in practice on and off the field, and along with the parents hostility, this is possible abuse to the children. Just a thought.


I understand this isnt the YMCA. BUT Do the kids really know what theyre signing up for? probably. Do they want to be signed up is the question. These kids are 8 and 9!!

I agree with what BareFootinWinter said,





It is the parents...and I feel sorry for the kids! Most will end up hating an activity they might have really liked and been great at!

Same as the parents who push kids in academics or music too. It gets ugly, fast.


I know its competitive, ive been there. There has to be a point where the line is crossed. You wouldn't agree that this is getting close?



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: Necrobile

Agreed. Its always been this bad, depending on geography. Keeping in mind that this league exists in Texas, and im sure where you.

I could never see this level of extremeness where I am from (upper middle class suburban land).

Not to sound condescending but,

From a sociological perspective, the more poor/uneducated the community, the more extreme their social bonding. This can be applied to sects and cults. In this case, Instead of religion its sports.



posted on Feb, 15 2016 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: frostie

I think it's f'ing hilarious that these grown men cry over losing! I do feel sorry for the kids. But ya know, if you dont play football ya ain't a real man.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 01:39 PM
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These shows have a limited shelf life.

At least the pageant shows pretty much went by the wayside. Soon these will too, and we'll think back in horror that we ever condoned it....(like "The Swan".....or "Am I Hot?"....shudders)



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: GroidNificent

I would say it is different from the pageantry in that the young football players have a lot more potential for lifelong injury and physical consequences. Look up long term effects of traumatic brain injuries and concussions.

I'm not defending child pageants either, they can be psychologically traumatizing for any child to have their life revolve around other's hopes and dreams and not their own.

Anyways, I think that contact sports have an extra layer of danger that pageants don't.



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Moirai

competitive pageants at a young age could be just as mentally harming as a concussion.

As far as breaking a leg?

One does it on a stage, the other a field.








 
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