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Traveling at light speed: would you percieve slower time or just be effected by it?

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posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: Erno86



or at least not until this questionable theory is proven as fact or fiction.

It has been proven. One example:
en.wikipedia.org...




posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Ghost147

I typed what I meant so apparently it would be the latter.

The rate of time for the person on the ship would not change.


Right, but wouldn't that mean that it would still feel like 1 year, not 10? (on the ship, that is)
edit on 13/2/16 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Xeven




I think there could be a difference and it might just feel like 10 years even though I age slower

It would feel like ten years. You would not age slower.
Time is relative, for you time would pass at a normal rate but you would "see" time passing faster on Earth. If you never returned to Earth, you would never know the difference.



I agree to disagree...on the theory that a space traveler travelling at any speed [below or at the speed of light or even in the superluminal realm] will "see time passing faster on Earth" or anywhere else --- Time is time for everyone in the universe --- Nobody is going to get around it --- IMHO --- or at least not until this questionable theory is proven as fact or fiction.


This has been proven many times, and time isn't a universally static dimension. It just can be difficult to comprehend as it seems paradoxical.
edit on 13/2/16 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: Erno86

Relativity says you aren't correct. The only way we could observe time dilation is by achieving speeds that would make the dilation noticeable. We can't get that fast yet, well unless you consider atomic clocks on the space station that run at microsecond differences than that of Earth



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147
Oops.
I got hung up on the last sentence of the OP.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Erno86

Relativity says you aren't correct. The only way we could observe time dilation is by achieving speeds that would make the dilation noticeable. We can't get that fast yet, well unless you consider atomic clocks on the space station that run at microsecond differences than that of Earth


We personally can't, but we have proven it using things that we can accelerate to near the speed of light.

Also, you don't need to be able to move that fast to have it's effects be noticeable. Even people in space stations move through time slower (from our perspective) than from here on Earth.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Ghost147
Oops.
I got hung up on the last sentence of the OP.


Haha, no problem.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Re-read my last sentence?



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Erno86

Relativity says you aren't correct. The only way we could observe time dilation is by achieving speeds that would make the dilation noticeable. We can't get that fast yet, well unless you consider atomic clocks on the space station that run at microsecond differences than that of Earth


and Phage,


I still disagree...time dilation might work on an atomic clock, but it is sure as heck not going to have an effect on any living organism in our universe --- Space traveler or not!!!



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Ghost147

Re-read my last sentence?


Ah, responded too quickly



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Erno86

Relativity says you aren't correct. The only way we could observe time dilation is by achieving speeds that would make the dilation noticeable. We can't get that fast yet, well unless you consider atomic clocks on the space station that run at microsecond differences than that of Earth


and Phage,


I still disagree...time dilation might work on an atomic clock, but it is sure as heck not going to have an effect on any living organism in our universe --- Space traveler or not!!!


It does, though.

Time dilation affects everything in movement, including biological mass.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: Erno86




time dilation might work on an atomic clock, but it is sure as heck not going to have an effect on any living organism in our universe --- Space traveler or not!!!
Why not? Every process (atomic or chemical) occurs in time.
edit on 2/13/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Erno86

Relativity says you aren't correct. The only way we could observe time dilation is by achieving speeds that would make the dilation noticeable. We can't get that fast yet, well unless you consider atomic clocks on the space station that run at microsecond differences than that of Earth


and Phage,


I still disagree...time dilation might work on an atomic clock, but it is sure as heck not going to have an effect on any living organism in our universe --- Space traveler or not!!!

Are you going for the foil-hat award?

Let's break this down;
What do you consider a living organism?
What do you consider a space traveller?



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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Accelerating up to Light Speed would either turn you into a raspberry jam stain... or you would die of old age getting up to speed.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: Leonidas
Accelerating up to Light Speed would either turn you into a raspberry jam stain... or you would die of old age getting up to speed.


Which is why hypothetical questions or so interesting.
edit on 13/2/16 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147
Of course, one does not have to reach the speed of light for time dilation to occur.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: Leonidas
Accelerating up to Light Speed would either turn you into a raspberry jam stain... or you would die of old age getting up to speed.

Accelerating to light speed is impossible, the mass will overcome the velocity.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Ghost147
Of course, one does not have to reach the speed of light for time dilation to occur.



True, I mentioned that in an earlier post



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Erno86




time dilation might work on an atomic clock, but it is sure as heck not going to have an effect on any living organism in our universe --- Space traveler or not!!!
Why not? Every process (atomic or chemical) occurs in time.


I'm still not convinced. How is this theory going to be proven by an atomic clock, and base it on space traveler [like our current manned space exploration program] that has purported to live 30 seconds less than a human Earthling that is based Earth at the same time? You can't prove it.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Erno86
If you think that time works differently for humans than for other things, I guess you're right. We'll have to wait for those long distance travelers to go there and back.



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