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Cutural Marxism is a Sociological Technology

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posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 09:41 AM
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I can't quite get the maths that makes it possible for the american aristocracy to use Marxism leading to the American Revolution, and other things mentioned, 40 years before Marx was even born.




posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: daskakik
I can't quite get the maths that makes it possible for the american aristocracy to use Marxism leading to the American Revolution, and other things mentioned, 40 years before Marx was even born.


Since the first ruler there has been liberty or social power on one side and the Ruler or the State power on the other side.

Liberty versus power or society versus the State.


My own basic perspective on the history of man, and a fortiori on the history of the United States, is to place central importance on the great conflict which is eternally waged between Liberty and Power, a conflict, by the way, which was seen with crystal clarity by the American revolutionaries of the eighteenth century. I see the liberty of the individual not only as a great moral good in itself (or, with Lord Acton, as the highest political good), but also as the necessary condition for the flowering of all the other goods that mankind cherishes: moral virtue, civilization, the arts and sciences, economic prosperity. Out of liberty, then, stem the glories of civilized life. But liberty has always been threatened by the encroachments of power, power which seeks to suppress, control, cripple, tax, and exploit the fruits of liberty and production. Power, then, the enemy of liberty, is consequently the enemy of all the other goods and fruits of civilization that mankind holds dear. And power is almost always centered in and focused on that central repository of power and violence: the state. With Albert Jay Nock, the twentieth-century American political philosopher, I see history as centrally a race and conflict between “social power”—the productive consequence of voluntary interactions among men—and state power. In those eras of history when liberty—social power—has managed to race ahead of state power and control, the country and even mankind have flourished. In those eras when state power has managed to catch up with or surpass social power, mankind suffers and declines.

Rothbard, Murray N. (2011-01-25). Conceived in Liberty (LvMI) . Ludwig von Mises Institute. Kindle Edition.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 07:22 PM
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Liberty leads to power, which is supported by the State. Society grows thanks to the same power and creates the same State to sustain itself.

This we see, for example, in U.S. history. That is, immigration and control of land, the use of military forces to counter Native Americans, slavery, industrialization coupled with fiat currency, the rise of industrialists and later financiers, control of money supply via the Fed (run by private banks), the start of consumerism coupled with mass production, the rise of consumerism, increased spending, and debt built on the petrodollar, supporting the petrodollar through military expansionism which, coupled with foreign policy, enhances globalization, etc., and now fallout from increasing borrowing and spending coupled with increasing energy production costs and long-term effects of environmental damage and global warming.



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

That really doesn't explain the use of the term when the situation has been around since "the first ruler".




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