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So which is it, is the IT field still open or is that propaganda?

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posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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So I've read that one of the best fields to get into right now is the IT field, but is that true?

I've read positions on both sides of the table but it's hard to get a real perspective on the truth here.

First how do you define the IT field?

Obviously getting into technology and robotics can be a great thing. I'm just curious of what I read about how in need people are in that field how much of it is actually true?




posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

They told me that in the early 80's too. I ended up working in the field for over 15 years before all the jobs got shipped to India. Do what you love and don't worry about what they say. It's all BS anyway.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 06:45 PM
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I can only speak for Sweden.

A lot of hype from my point of view to get people to learn the field to keep wages down.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I was laid off in technology sales almost 20 yrs ago. I have an IT company for going on 16 yrs. Ever evolving, always changing. They can move as much/many help desk , call centers as they want; the U.S. is still in need of talented technicians and engineers; and the need continues to grow every day.

I define IT as - all things technical





posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 06:56 PM
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I have been in IT field for most of my life and totally agree with Metallicus. If you have a logical brain for programming, you can write your own software and sell it, which kept me funded for 10+ years, but that also has been flooded of late.

Think if I was looking for a field that would guarantee income in a economically declining world I'd try get in a field that is needed by society for survival - Food, Health (hospitals etc) or energy.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

The IT field is huge and covers everything used in everyday life.

From what you can hold in your hand to what's in a datacenter thousands of miles away in the cloud.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 07:13 PM
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That is too vague of a question to answer..

Which specific parts of IT?
edit on 7-2-2016 by opethPA because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

When people say IT, they do not typically mean robotics though there's of course overlap in that robots have controllers containing microprocessors, software and the like.

IT (Information Technology) as the name implies, generally refers to the use of computer and telecommunication technologies to store, manipulate, retrieve, display and otherwise communicate information.

Certain jobs are easily outsourced like live support chat (which itself displaces support jobs) and some software development (think inexpensive web dev but also some major vendors products) but in all honesty, the future is bright for most areas of IT because short of an apocalyptic scenario, there's no chance of decomputerization and quite to the contrary — technology is still evolving to become an even bigger part of doing business and our daily lives.

To give you an idea, consider my own job:

I'm an IT director + chief software developer for a regional transportation and storage company. I oversee all manners of things: administration of servers (Linux, Windows, virtual and physical), desktops, network attached storage, mobile devices & handheld scanners, wired and wireless networks (routers, switches, access points, etc) including point to point connections and even one microwave link, databases (mysql and sqlserver), web servers, emails servers, Active Directory, our website our warehouse management system (which I designed and develop), accounting software, transportation management system, desktop software (productivity, AV, etc) and some failover power and backups of all the data/disaster planning and desktop support (though I only have two support people). Also surveillance equipment (cameras, DVRs, networks) and VOIP (Avaya) to a lesser degree —installation and some maintenance/repair are handled by a contractor. The only thing we outsource is printer servicing (to a local service company) because it's cost effective.

I telecommute 3-4 days a week and I have a couple of techs onsite.

If you look at most any list of top career fields, it's dominated by medical and IT professions. That said, it's definitely not for everyone and there are quite a few people who may make decent/good money but won't necessarily break into the upper middle class in IT (just like medicine — some people are doctors, some people are nurse assistants).
edit on 2016-2-7 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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IT- Internet Technology (expanded to include any work with technology of any form)
Is it still alive today ? Yeah , if you live in India



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 07:53 PM
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I retired from the IT field a few years ago. I managed a small department of what I would call gifted IT people who knew a lot more than my self-taught self. I had my own strengths in promoting our work and dealing with budgets and bureaucracy, but I could not actually DO it like the folks I had could. I basically was able to get them the resources they needed to excel in their jobs. I maintain these points:

1. If you are a truly good IT person well versed in Linux, Cisco, networking, security, or some sort of esoteric systems, etc. you will have no problem finding a very good IT job. Your skills are valuable and needed. And frankly, you know who you are.

2. If you simply go to a school, pass some tests, and come out with some sort of degree or certification saying, "I are an IT person!" --not so much. The market is flooded with people like that. Being a beginner in IT is no fun at all.

The difference between actually BEING good and THINKING you are good is sometimes difficult to measure and quantify and difficult to test for. I know some people don't like Microsoft out of principal, but their employment testing is very rigorous (Friend of mine wrote a book about it: Fred Moody: "I sing the body electronic; a year with Microsoft on the electronic frontier." Our kids were friends.) So are Facebook, Twitter, and Google. If you can pass their hiring gauntlet, you're pretty good.

That's why I believe that people who are laid off one field and are "re-trained" in IT, sometimes at considerable expense, are getting the shaft. Obama's "Let's make everyone a programmer!" initiative is not going to work.

3. The field moves very fast. I am (still) a CNE: Certified Novell Engineer, something I worked very hard for and spent a lot of money for which is now completely worthless and outmoded. I'm also a journeyman level dBase programmer--I could do anything in that language--even accounts payable, another now useless skill. It's nice for history and to show how old I am, but it won't get me a job.

So the idea is to find a skill that is up and coming and learn THAT to a journey level before it becomes outmoded. In my admittedly less than cutting-edge perspective I'd look to programming apps in Android, myself. I also think VR and AI are emerging fields that are going to take off. Anything with robotics will be valuable. I'm talking industrial control systems here--automated factories like Amazon is pushing. Automation is going to take our jobs, but someone has to run those robots. And VR in the gaming field, especially, is going to be huge.

Or become a barber. Robots can't cut hair.

I don't envy anyone trying to break into the field. And I wish you good luck in making the right choices here.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 08:02 PM
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I think the key is realizing that just because you go to a bootcamp and pass a CCNA doesn't mean some company is going to offer you 100k.

Im 23 years into a Unified Communications (Cisco, Avaya Red, Legacy Nortel) career and Im over 5 years into working in a 400-500 person IS staff for a major healthcare system.

Go in expecting that someone or some company owes you something simply because you have an entry level cert or a college degree and you will be disappointed.

A better way to make a career out of IT is to figure which element of it makes you happy..If its telecom-voice like it is for me, or networking or Infosec or System admin or development or something..just have a target..have a plan to make yourself useful.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: opethPA

What if I chose networking.... Are the Cisco certifications the best way to get started with that?



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: opethPA

What if I chose networking.... Are the Cisco certifications the best way to get started with that?


Without real-world experience, they're a dime a dozen. I'm Cisco Certified. Book knowledge only gets you so far. I would be asking you questions like these:

1. Construct a Cat 5 Ethernet cable. Put the orange, green, blue, and brown wires is an industry-accepted pattern and make it pass a cable test. Have a working knowledge of all the tools necessary to make this happen.

2. If you have several computers with suddenly no connection, how do you determine whether you need to partition a port or replace a 16-port hub? How fast can you do it in a mission-critical environment?

3. Let's say your web server just went down. What steps should you have taken to ensure this does not happen?

4. Let's say you apply to ICANN for a complete Class 3 network assignment. They refuse and offer you a block of eight. What do you do?

See the issue here? Lots of people have said so above. Certifications are all well and good, but they don't mean crap if you don't know the fundamentals of what you are doing.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Hmmm....

How about this... go to Monster.com, SimplyHired.com, or whatever nationwide job board and search CCNA, CCNP, CCIE.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: opethPA

What if I chose networking.... Are the Cisco certifications the best way to get started with that?


Is networking something your interested in?

A better way to get started is to learn the fundamentals because you want to and then see if you can from there find a passion for something specific.

Anyyone can grab a brain dump and pass an exam..First time a call routing loop (if you are a UC tech) or a spanning tree (data ) loop hits people will find out real fast you are just a paper tech.

Figure out what excites you and go for that..
edit on 7-2-2016 by opethPA because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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Once you find something that 'jazzes you" learn it, live it, not for the money but for the adventure and thirst for learning. If you look at it as if that is too much work, that is not your field...search for another. Once you find the match, find someone willing to pay you for the effort. Then, plan to find another one of these passions in about 5-7 years. Rinse and repeat.

PS: The filed requires a constant learning curve. It will never end, so don't expect your expertise today will be relevant in those 5-7 years.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 10:04 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
So I've read that one of the best fields to get into right now is the IT field, but is that true?

I've read positions on both sides of the table but it's hard to get a real perspective on the truth here.

First how do you define the IT field?

Obviously getting into technology and robotics can be a great thing. I'm just curious of what I read about how in need people are in that field how much of it is actually true?


I've been in the IT field for 20+ years. To answer your question. NO. The IT field right now is garbage. At least on the east coast. You are not only competing with overseas workers, but with the swarms of college kids who will work for next to nothing.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

My husband has worked with computers for over 50 years.I would
not be too sure of getting an IT job in the future.My husband had to
train his replacement worker from India.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: mamabeth
a reply to: onequestion

My husband has worked with computers for over 50 years.I would
not be too sure of getting an IT job in the future.My husband had to
train his replacement worker from India.


I've done that twice so far, and once more for China. This is why it is imperative to maintain a continual learning curve in and technology field that one can do remotely without actual hands-on physical requirements.



posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I've been in the field since before I graduated from college.

Here's the catch with the IT-industry on a whole - it's an amazing field to get into while you are still young, because if you can get over the learning curve, then you will have no problem.

I will say this though - like anything, you have to have a passion to do this. A good case in point: I'm very passionate about programming in general; I maintained a straight A+ in all honors-level programming classes back in high-school. I went into the field not because of the promise for a big payout...but because it was one of the few things I knew I was good at outside of music. The person that graduated next to me was only in it for the money, and turned elsewhere when all he could get was internships.

There is another thing to consider as well: What will happen when you can no-longer keep up with the kids programming html13 or working with the "illuminatus coding scheme"? The general impression that I've had was that by the time that comes, I'm supposed to be retired (or, be a manager/ceo/supreme overlord for the software).

On a final note - there isn't a shortage of jobs in that industry - it's not everyday you get an offer to play around with a micro-controller as part of your job interview.

-foss



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