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Atomic/nuclear explosion in outer space, could it create a black hole?

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posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

So eventually earth will be consumed by this behemoth? Everything actually right?




posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: anton74

Thanks.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: Sargeras

Cool thanks.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: anton74
a reply to: areyousirius360

Below is a link that will give you an idea of how trivial our nukes are.



SGR 1806-20


A flee on a flee on a flee on a flee on a flee on a miniature dogs butt!

That is the power of our pathetically tiny little nukes in the Grand scale of power in just this solar system.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 08:02 PM
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originally posted by: areyousirius360
a reply to: TrueBrit

So eventually earth will be consumed by this behemoth? Everything actually right?


No, actually ours doesn't even feed very often.

If it did we would have quasar jets shooting thousands of light years out of the galaxy at the north and south poles of the " super massive blackholes" poles.

It would be very visible from here like giving you a sun burn at night bright!
en.m.wikipedia.org...

They are quite spectacular!!!



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 08:31 PM
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Aren't black holes caused by implosion?

Therefore an explosion wouldn't cause a BH



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: Kuroodo
Don't hydrogen bombs implode?



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 08:50 PM
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originally posted by: areyousirius360
a reply to: Kuroodo
Don't hydrogen bombs implode?


If it imploded, then there wouldn't be an explosion would there?

And there is in fact a giant explosion with a shockwave that travels at the speed of sound.

To clarify, it starts as an implosion, to cause fusion through pressure, but then.... BOOM!!!!!



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: Kuroodo
Aren't black holes caused by implosion?

Therefore an explosion wouldn't cause a BH


If an explosion happens around a core object, it must push on the core object with the same force it moves away with, opposite and equal reaction.

There it is an implosion of the core mass, because the outside mass explodes away in a release of more energy per second than our sun will create in its life.

This crushes the core, that then is pushed into a volume to small for its mass to support itself.

So it collapses into a singularity.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: areyousirius360

Interesting question. I know like in Star Wars and other movies with explosion sounds and flames....there isnt supposed to be any sound nor flame as space is a vacuum.

In none of our sci fi movies with explosions, fire and sound...would there be any. Its just for movie effect. I'd like to know the answer here as well?!



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 09:18 PM
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PS: Yes, we would see the explosion....just not flames or sound



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 09:45 PM
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originally posted by: mysterioustranger
PS: Yes, we would see the explosion....just not flames or sound


Actually, if you were in a craft, and close enough, there would be a shockwave, and it would resonate in the hull of the ship, so you could here the sound.

Though you would likely be killed immediately.

But at a distance, no, you would hear nothing.
edit on 3-2-2016 by Sargeras because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 10:28 PM
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To answer your question in one word . No
It takes an energy release equal to a red dwarf star exploding in a supernova to create a self-sustaining black hole.



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 04:09 AM
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a reply to: areyousirius360

Nothing except a few fried satellites if its close to orbit.

You need compressed mass to create a black hole.


Plus there is already a massive nuclear explosion happening in space right now thats trillions of times bigger than all the Nuclear weapons that have been denoted by man put together........its called the sun........and it has trillions of cousins.



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 07:12 AM
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Black holes are created through gravitational collapse. Granted, massive stars collapsing into a black hole create super-powerful "explosions" we call supernovae, but it's not the explosion itself that actually creates a black hole. The black hole is created by all the mass of the star (or rather, the star's core) not being able to support itself against gravitational collapse because it ceased producing thermonuclear reactions.

So, ironically to this thread, a black hole is the result of a massive star not being a slow and giant thermonuclear "explosion" anymore.



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: crazyewokThat's cool I'm not a scientifically oriented person but I appreciate the education everyone has given me. Thank you.



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: areyousirius360
a reply to: TrueBrit

So eventually earth will be consumed by this behemoth? Everything actually right?

Black holes are not like vacuum cleaners. They can't pull things into their maw that are far away -- things need to be very close to a black hole in order to be irrevocably captured by its gravity.

For example (and very hypothetically), say our Sun instantaneously turned into a black hole -- one with the mass the Sun currently has. All of that mass would be much smaller (contained in a mathematical singularity), but the gravitational pull of the black hole on the orbiting planets would be the same as it was for the Sun, because the mass of the black hole is that same as the sun, and the distance from each planet is the same as it was for the sun.

So the earth and other planets would just keep on their present orbits around that black hole that was once the Sun. Of course if you get close to that black hole (say 2000 miles), the gravity would be inescapable because you are so close to all of that mass, but not from 93 million miles.

So a black hole is more like a Venus flytrap than it is a vacuum cleaner.


edit on 2/4/2016 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: Box of Rain
I see. Makes sense, the galaxy essentially orbits the bh, right?




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