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My faster than light communication device.

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posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

If this hypothetical scenario would actually be physically possible, the speed of transfer of information would be dependant on the speed with which you push the rod, and I don't know wether your scenario allows for FTL rod pushing speeds, or not.

If not, than such a communication would not be FTL, regardless of the distance over which it took place.


edit on 3-2-2016 by DutchMasterChief because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: VoidHawk

Basically there is nothing "perfectly rigid" because any rod, even one of an as yet undiscovered element, would be still be composed of atoms held together by electromagnetic forces and what would be happening is the force exerted on one end would move as a wave, propagating through the rod with atoms pushing against their neighbors who in turn pushed against their neighbors and so on.

This ^^ is exactly why I posted. I remember watching a docu in which they said nothing actualy touches anything else, like when we sit in a chair we are held above the chair by the forces that you mention, I just wasn't sure if they were squishy enough to foil my rod idea.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: DutchMasterChief
a reply to: VoidHawk

If this hypothetical scenario would actually be physically possible, the speed of transfer of information would be dependant on the speed with which you push the rod, and I don't know wether your scenario allows for FTL rod pushing speeds, or not.

If not, than such a communication would not be FTL, regardless of the distance over which it took place.



Assuming this was physically possible, and no squishing of the rod took place, the rod only needs to move at say one mph; because the other end would move at the exact same time, so the rod would not be needing to move at ftl speeds.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Maybe after superconductivity kicks in with all these new metamaterials.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

But I assume a certain distance has to be traveled in order to make a measurement.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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then by pushing on one end, the other end should pop out at exactly the same time.

how would it be faster than light?



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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I don't want to be that guy, but when you have simple (non super complicated math) ideas about breaking some important law of physics that may have millions of people try to disprove, a google search may be good to save some time.

Asking is good, I got nothing against it, its just that probably it was asked on Reddit first

www.reddit.com...

But I applaud your inventive spirit never give up, you may some day find something
(We wont know, the MIB will get at you first)
edit on 3-2-2016 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:17 PM
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Unfortunately, turning a long tube wouldn't be instantaneous. Even with car engine crankshafts, care must be taken to ensure that the slight delay in twisting along the crankshaft (due to the slight springiness of the metal) doesn't affect ignition timing.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: DutchMasterChief
a reply to: VoidHawk

But I assume a certain distance has to be traveled in order to make a measurement.

One inch movement at one end would mean one inch movement at the other end. This all assume we had the materials to make perfectly rigid materials.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: Rikku



then by pushing on one end, the other end should pop out at exactly the same time.

how would it be faster than light?

It wouldnt be, but the information would be.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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Well another problem is the speed limit is 'C' which happens to be the speed of light since it has no mass. The phonons (vibrations) traveling through the rod still would take a year to travel that distance. Even if it were solid.

Change the value of 'C' somehow and you can go faster.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell
Unfortunately, turning a long tube wouldn't be instantaneous. Even with car engine crankshafts, care must be taken to ensure that the slight delay in twisting along the crankshaft (due to the slight springiness of the metal) doesn't affect ignition timing.


No, you got it wrong.
Think about the break cable on a bicycle. Outer tube with cable in the middle. Outer tube prevents the cable from buckling up. Push the inner cable it pops out the other end at the same time. No rotation at all



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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This all assume we had the materials to make perfectly rigid materials.


hypothetically, but youve just made a gallactic morse code machine.

nothing faster than me tapping you on the head.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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originally posted by: Indigent
(We wont know, the MIB will get at you first)


Thats probably the truest words spoken in this thread



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:24 PM
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originally posted by: Rikku



This all assume we had the materials to make perfectly rigid materials.


hypothetically, but youve just made a gallactic morse code machine.

nothing faster than me tapping you on the head.

Exactly, but I'd feel that tap on the head one year before any radio signal reached me.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk




One inch movement at one end would mean one inch movement at the other end. This all assume we had the materials to make perfectly rigid materials.


Like I said, in order to detect movement, you have to allow for some travel in order to make a measurement about moving and not moving.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk
You made me laugh sooooo... hard!
Thank you




posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

It doesn't pop out on the other end at the same time though. The phonons still take slower than the value of 'C' to travel down through the material and push it out on the other end. Nothings faster than light. But if you could change the value for 'C' then you could travel faster than the rest of the stuff stuck at the old value of 'C' and going just the ordinary speed of light.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk
Nope. If your theory is correct then ANY rigid material of ANY length would transfer the energy from one end to the other instantly i.e. faster than the speed of light.

Your perception of rigidity is based on a macro world view. All materials are made up of atoms and the "space" inside and between atoms is massive compared to the apparent size of the sub atomic particles.

Your push/pull force propogates a wave of energy transferring from particle to particle travelling no faster than the speed of light.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: yorkshirelad

Yes I was semi aware of this, thats why I replied above with this


I remember watching a docu in which they said nothing actually touches anything else, like when we sit in a chair we are held above the chair by the forces that you mention, I just wasn't sure if they were squishy enough to foil my rod idea.





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