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Finally quitting!

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posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

Good for you, Charlie.

I'm going to tell you the way it is, from my perspective.

Stopping smoking is the single hardest thing you will ever do. You might at some point thing your mind is bifurcated -- one side says that you want to stop this behaviour, and the other says "what's the harm". I used to say, "quitting smoking is EASY -- I've done it lots of times", and it's true. The last time took, and I've been smoke-free for several years.

See, your brain likes the chemicals. It does. Your mind might well create all manner of dramas for you to explore, such as: "Well, it's been a while, maybe you should take a puff or two, just to see how it tastes -- maybe it will taste horrible, and you'll be reinforced." Do NOT fall for it. Your brain is temporarily your enemy. I know that sounds weird, but it has been true for me. You have to just dig in and not do it. Go ahead and be around your friends who smoke, go ahead and take nose-hits of it if it makes you feel better.

Myself, I had to remove myself from my friends for several weeks.

See, it's not the physical addiction that is so strong; a dedicated person can get through that. It's the psychological addiction that is so very [expletive] hard to break.

You have to be mindful of triggers. Triggers that you associate with smoking. I quit smoking and discovered that I had a trigger that I didn't know about, which was playing the guitar. I used to squeeze a cig thin and slip it between the strings and the neck while I played. I was so sorrowful to discover that I couldn't play the guitar without wanting to smoke, so I lit one and stuck it in the strings and didn't smoke it.

You are going to be on a rough row to hoe and that's no #. I'm telling you true. If you really want to quit, and you are dedicated toward doing so, you are going to have to fight, really fight for it. Don't use food as a substitute. Fight, mon. If you want to PM me for support, I am more than willing. I beat it, and you are not less than me. Believe that. I am just an ordinary man. You can do it. I will help you if you want.

I don't know you, but I'm proud of you.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 11:42 PM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

You could switch to an e-cig.Get a good rig and it's totally easy.

You'll need to pay about 100 $/£/€ to start with but it's the only method that works.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 01:10 AM
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I quit last Wednesday. It's been terrible. I hate it. I truly love smoking but it just seems right. I bought a black and mild today and it helped sort of... I guess that's not really a victory but hey no cigs right? Got to keep it up. Tomorrow is back to square one just like every other morning. But i know it gets easier. If we make it three weeks we are golden! Keep me/ us posted! We can do it together!!



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 03:59 AM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

Excellent!

Without reading any other replies I'll say this -

Ignore anyone who suggests E cigs.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 05:35 AM
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Yay! I'm happy for you!

A friend of mine went to her doc and he prescribed chantix. It helped her A LOT, with cravings, and she really didn't go all nutso cranky when she wasn't getting the amount of nicotine that she was used to. I have been tossing around the idea of quiting, I know that I NEED to, but I have to convince myself that I WANT to.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: and14263

Because they work?That's a peculiar thing to write.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

Here's to you and your efforts!
I understand the big step in announcing it publicly. I quit three months ago, and didn't tell anyone (but my doctor).
Slowly people around me just started to notice I wasn't going out with them for a smoke ever, and questioning that.

But a big reason was that I didn't want the extra pressure and accountability others would place on me.
Once you say it outloud, well, you better not fail! -and for me, feeling pressure or stress makes me want to smoke....so, putting extra pressure on myself to quit smoking is sort of counter productive.

I did it. But I am feeling a bit irritated with the extra pounds I have put on. I look terrible. Even though I keep up going to the gym and doing yoga as well, I've got hard muscles, but they are covered in blubber.
I can't stop eating! I'm eating sugary stuff as well, which I normally don't like at all. I think I just traded in my nicotine addiction for a sugar one.

It's only been three months, so I haven't given up hope to find a healthy balance again - that comes eventually, I have seen in the past.

But I still desire cigarettes. I have end of world dreams in which I get a good excuse to buy a pack because the world is going to blow up or something. Maybe that's the real root of doom porn?

Good luck to ya!
edit on 2-2-2016 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: argentus

See, your brain likes the chemicals. It does. Your mind might well create all manner of dramas for you to explore, such as: "Well, it's been a while, maybe you should take a puff or two, just to see how it tastes -- maybe it will taste horrible, and you'll be reinforced." Do NOT fall for it. Your brain is temporarily your enemy. psychological addiction that is so very [expletive] hard to break.



OMG, this is SO true!

I have a mind that comes to these extremely well put together rationalisations that would pull me back in!
It's amazing to me how complicated my ideas could get, remembering explaining to others my theories on why "having just one cig once in a while actually reinforces my repulsion to them" or other such poppycock.

I finally know - there is no new and creative answers. There is no special innovative way for me to smoke and not smoke at the same time. ("but, but...quantum physics says...." shut up brain!!!)


-And e-cigarettes? In my opinion, those should not be brought up in any discussion on stopping smoking. They continue to further the nicotine addiction. They are another form of continuing it and remaining a slave to the addiction.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: Bluesma

Nicotine itself isn't addictive but tobacco certainly is.I agree that someone wishing to stop should REALLY stop,however:I never could.In 30 years of smoking and trying to give up the only thing that worked was the e-cig.

Referring back to your previous post,you've put weight on-apparently this may be unavoidable because the tobacco speeds up the metabolism.Please do not despair,it'll normalise itself but it takes time.

I feel that being a bit wobbly about the midriff is still better than smelling of burnt carpet.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: Ericthedoubter

I feel that being a bit wobbly about the midriff is still better than smelling of burnt carpet.


I agree. My husband really helped me out by describing how he finds women my age more attractive with a bit of extra weight, rather than thin. I don't know if he was lying to make me feel better, but I don't care if that is the case, still helped me stay motivated.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 11:16 AM
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Chronicling your experience is a great idea. I finally found the strength to quit 6 months ago and I'm doing great. I came across the occasional quit smoking thread here at ATS and they're very encouraging/helpful.

One member quit about the same time I did but he has since been banned, hope it wasn't the stress over quitting. Anyway I felt a bit lost after he was gone and it will be nice to check in on your thread.

I really have no advice except, getting my head in the right place made quitting much easier to deal with. Imo the quit smoking threads here at ATS helped me do that. ATS is a great community, couldn't ask for better resources/support.

I wasn't too sure about vaping. I thought it might work better than patches or drugs but I wanted to give cold turkey a try first. I'm not a habitual quitter so I hoped if I set my mind to it, I'd follow through.

6 months in absolutely no cheating, no vaping and no cravings. The worst is an occasional longing that seems to be fading with time. I've smoked since I was 16 and the first week was pretty bad but I wanted to be a non smoker more than anything.

What helped most was staying busy. I worked on the house, cleaned out closets, cabinets, attic, shed you name it. I painted/stained interior/exterior surfaces, bought some new furniture/accent pieces with money once spent on smokes. I'm still not done with the house but I'm so done with cigarettes.

That first week driving without smoking was tough. Tootsie roll pops kept me from losing my mind/flipping off everyone. I'd catch myself holding it like a cigarette LOL. Now I don't need anything. The manual transmission keeps my hands busy which helps just don't tell my hubby I said that, I complain about them all the time.

I wish you all the best and damn it don't get banned!



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

OH MY GOD so I quit like over a year ago now maybe and it was the best thing I ever did for myself.

So, but I used my imagination to really picture a smokeless life and I kept telling myself, "You never smoked! You were never a smoker!" And whenever it was time to smoke a cigarette ritually (like after eating, for example), I'd just "pretend" to not be a smoker and kind of stretch and swing my arms around and be full of wonder about all the extra space I would have to do all kinds of new activities... (so much room for activities, anyone? lol). And also you'll save a SHlT TON of money I promise. And not JUST the cost of the cigarettes... because basically every time I went to the store to buy cigarettes... I'd find every reason to buy gum, a bag of chips, three water bottles and whatever else was there in my face calling my name. Like a good little consumer. But now that I'm not going to the store frequently to purchase cigarettes... I rarely spend money on anything I don't need anymore. I was never a real big shopper anyway but wow, you'll save.

But I did use the patches. If you're going to go the patch route... I'd do what I did. I'd buy all the steps at once, which cost about 300 dollars maybe (which is less than the cost of two months worth of cigarettes anyway) and I always carried an extra one on me and in my car. Cause I'm kind of busy and also I rush around sometimes and I anticipated that I might forget to change it in the morning, which did happen from time to time, and so by always having one on me or in my vehicle... I'd be able to switch em on the go and not feel defeated. If I hadn't done that then the moment that I forgot to change it... I would've thrown my arms up in defeat and bought cigarettes for the day. So it's important to always keep an extra one on you. Also, by purchasing all the steps at once... it decreases your visits to stores dramatically and limits your contact with other people which is important I think. Tbh, I never used the last box of the last step, but it was all worth it.

Oh my god I can't shut up. So. I also read in a textbook about how we wake up with a specific reserve of "self-control." And as the day goes on... it becomes depleted, slowly. So, one is never advised to try to diet AND quit smoking at the same time because it'll deplete your reserve too quickly and midday you'll be defeated by a lack of self-control and you'll give into everything. So just focus on one thing at a time(I chose the summer time to quit, during a long break in-between semesters of school) and forget that the rest of the world exists. Eat a lot. Sleep a lot. Be as selfish and greedy as you need to be during this vulnerable time.

Good luck!



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 07:08 PM
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Noooo OP! Don't do it!

Everybody dies, I choose lung cancer.



posted on Feb, 5 2016 @ 05:00 AM
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originally posted by: Ericthedoubter
a reply to: and14263

Because they work?That's a peculiar thing to write.

1) Because it's not classed as 'quitting' - the kid is elated about quitting. E cigarettes still give nicotine which is what the body is addicted too.

2) No matter what drivel you tell me - they are not harmless. There is all sorts of bad practice in the manufacturing processes.

3) They make you look like a c*ck.



posted on Feb, 14 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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originally posted by: Charlie3Dog
Hello!
I've decided, after many failed attempts, that I am once and for all quitting smoking. Big freakin' deal, right? Well it is and has been for me. While I've never publicly declared this intention, I have reached out for help on other sites and have been met with general disgust. Not exactly the support that I needed. However, ATS has been a relatively positive place, and by no means am I seeking out support. (It'll probably come though!) I think what purpose I am looking to achieve here is a few things:
1: Maybe I can inspire others to quit as well.
2: I'd like to, hopefully, chronicle the experiences I go through.
3: I suffer from pretty bad psoriasis, extremely dry eyes and dry mouth. Whether or not any of this is attributed to smoking, who knows, but I'll update those conditions as well.
4: By publicly stating my attempt at quitting, it feels real this time...I feel an accountability.

I hope it works!
Much Love


How are you doing with this are you still on track the first 5 days are the worst.

when I quit I was smoking 40 a day and to help me stop everytime I wanted one I told myself I could have one in 5 minutes time then you would forget all about it.

you have to realise that smoking tobacco is not a bad thing but the lowlife scum add in about 400 additives as well as spraying the crops 3 times a day with the most potent pesticide they can use, these create 7000 chemicals once you light up.

One way to make things a bit easier is to buy or pick some Lobelia Inflata/Indian Tobacco when dry you can smoke this instead, there is a chemical in it that fits into your nicotine receptors and removes the craving

You would also benefit from buying some Di methyl Glycine or B15 this regenerates your liver oxidises your cells muscles and also has been proven to help with drug and alcohol addictions www.onlineholistichealth.com...
you might have to do a bit of research on it although I would stay with the Russian version of it they studied it for 20 years as well as extensive studies in Italy Switzerland and Hungary.



posted on Feb, 15 2016 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

It’s a good decision. You can try acupuncture to help you quit smoking.



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: Charlie3Dog

Thought I'd check in, see how you're doing. It's been about month since you first posted, hope you've gotten through it.

The first month was the toughie for me but afterwards it got a whole lot easier.

Don't give up if it's what you really want. I don't know too many people more addicted than I was yet here I am 6 months later, nicotine free.

Cold turkey was all I deserved for my years of overindulgence. I had to be very firm with myself, tough love was definitely in order. Drill-sergeant-boot-camp-mean is what I needed. No pity party, crybabies allowed.

More than anything it's our mindset. Imo geezlouise's advice is worth repeating it absolutely worked for me, helped chase away those cravings.


originally posted by: geezlouise
So, but I used my imagination to really picture a smokeless life and I kept telling myself "You never smoked! You were never a smoker!" And whenever it was time to smoke a cigarette ritually (like after eating, for example), I'd just "pretend" to not be a smoker and kind of stretch and swing my arms around and be full of wonder about all the extra space I would have to do all kinds of new activities... (so much room for activities, anyone? lol). And also you'll save a SHlT TON of money I promise.

Stick with it. I have saved a sh!t ton of money, used it to make upgrades to our home. I painted our whole damn house just to keep myself busy. This happened at the same time we had to have our home appraised/refinanced. It appraised for so much more than we expected, we have crazy equity.

Maybe it's just a coincidence but it seems like so much good has come about since I quit smoking. Seeing how I'm a long time ATSer, imo, there are no coincidences. LOL There might be something to it, a sort of butterfly effect.

We all pick our poison, don't beat yourself up if you can't break that bond. I never intended to quit. One month prior I told a friend "we all had to die, smoking's how I'll probably go." It was quality of life for me. I live at altitude and I'm very active. There was no denying the huffing/puffing was slowing me down. It's not that I fear death so much, the reality of lugging around an oxygen bottle or giving up my level of activity too soon all because of a stupid, controlling bad habit was too over the top for me...I exorcised the demon. Good luck



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: Morningglory

I also painted and cleaned and reorganized almost everything I own out of boredom and restlessness for just about the entire summer that I focused on quitting, LOL. I just put on some music and went at it at things until I was tuckered out and slept. I also spent a lot of time grooming myself, as weird as that sounds- like doing my nails all the time, doing my hair, taking long long long showers, etc. Now a days... things are starting to get dusty, lol. And I never do my nails anymore. But everything smells good.! And my clothes don't stink anymore!

Its ok if you don't make it on the first try because it took me a few times before I finally got fed up and yes, I got militant about it too pretty much. But when you mess up on a diet it doesn't mean you just throw up your hands and give up forever. You just get back on track the next day. The reserve of self control is extremely important though like people should consider quitting during a down time in the year, during the least stressful time (so not around holidays?) where contact with people is limited outside of necessary work situations. And have a plan for when things get extra emotional (like imagine all the worst possible situations beforehand, then imagine how you will act in those times without giving into to cigarettes and stick to it).

Anyway, I have been enjoying this thread thoroughly, lol. Thanks Morningglory!



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