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It’s Official: Petraeus Won’t Get Demoted

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posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:40 AM
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dailycaller.com...


Defense Secretary Ash Carter has finally decided he will not demote retired Gen. David Petraeus for leaking classified information to his biographer and mistress.

According to a letter sent to GOP Sen. John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Army completed its review of the situation and did not recommend any additional action against Petraeus. In early 2015, Petraeus pled guilty to mishandling classified material, at which point he was placed on probation for two years and had to pay a $100,000 fine.


So, now that Hillary is likely to be indicted on charges eerily similar to General Patraeus, a downplay of his crime is in order. I saw this blurb on the news yesterday and had to laugh. Not that I feel General Patraeus deserved to be punished more than he has, but if this can be swept under the rug, hopefully, nobody is intelligent enough to put 2 and 2 together.

The facts are that General Patraeus was charged, plead guilty, and was punished, should be enough to frighten anyone at Hillary's campaign headquarters.

Mishandling classified information is a crime. There doesn't seem to be any grey area here.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: network dude

I guess he and Oliver North will be cracking open a beer sometime soon.

' Olly, here's to us and the crimes we got away with' *ka-chink*

Could we expect anything else? When it comes to the US Brass the rules are more like guidelines. Thank whatever deity you prey to that this decades long nonsense hasn't ended up in a disaster. Those at the top of the pecking order should have the book thrown at them as they are the ones that the civilians entrust to protect their nation.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie

while both did break the law, do you think Ollie went all rouge on us, or was he just following orders and took the fall when busted? I personally think he was ordered, then given a WHOLE lot of leeway on how he fulfilled those orders. Either way, busted, charged, and punished.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 12:07 PM
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You gotta love it. He quit the job. He retired and hung up his (heavily laden) uniform after something like 40 years in the service. After that he took another job, commenced an affair, and got caught. Now people want to retro-actively demote him? Say what?

And what would that accomplish? Would it reduce his retirement? It might. It might not. The difference in base pay between an O-9 and an O-10 is 17,436.90 vs 19,726.50 per month, so at 3/4 base pay retirement pay for O-9 would be $13,077 vs $14,794 for an O-10, so about $1700 a month difference. EXCEPT THAT at those ranks Base Pay is limited to $15,125 per month, just slightly more than an O-8, WHICH MEANS both an O-9 and an O-10 have the SAME Base Pay. Perks while on active duty are undoubtedly more, but not in terms of money. (BAH: Basic Allowance for Housing, is the same for O-7+) and there are some extra pay amounts for active duty generals in key posts, so O-10's do make more in practice, but these are only for active duty and don't apply to retired personnel.

SO IF they base retirement on the actual amount, $15,125, his retirement as a Full General would be $11,344 per month and his retirement as a Lieutenant General would be: $11,344. IF they base retirement on the fake amount in the Pay schedules they don't actually get, then his retirement would be about $1700 per month less.

So all this kind of begs the question. What's the point again? What would the practical effect of a demotion be? He couldn't brag about being a full General at cocktail parties? If a demotion were to happen, it would only be to say they had done it and feel good about themselves.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

I had honestly thought all his crimes and punishments were already dealt with. But with the current situation going on regarding Hillary, the public needed to hear some soothing news about Patraeus so should Sec. Clinton's crimes be brushed under the rug, most won't think of the correlation to the Generals' crimes. (I believe)

Timing is just a bit to ironic for me to ignore it. (being the fan of irony that I am)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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when you're in the club and you toe the line, bad things seem to miss happening to you.

He obviously pissed off someone to have his emails leaked like that. Since then...he has been a good soldier, and will be rewarded by not being stripped of rank, and possibly having a career left to draw income from.

Thugs, all of them.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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Well Petraeus was sold to the American people as a war hero. His service got him appointed to head the CIA, and allegedly there was some talk of giving him a 5th star. Though that was no doubt just a "feel good measure."

I was dismayed when I heard the Secretary of Defense was considering demoting him. I don't think the American public likes to hear it when the heroes they have been programmed to admire are treated like this. The Army had decided that General Petraeus had been punished sufficiently, so that no other action was warranted.

I think it's possible that Petraeus demotion was considered because of political reasons. It's just as likely that the SecDef made the decision not to demote him for the same reasons. Perhaps this move was made so that the prosecution of Hillary would also likely to just result in the same slap on the wrist as Petraeus.

If all Hillary gets is a misdemeanor conviction, I'm fine with that. Anything as long as she doesn't become POTUS. Of course the alternative choices are almost as bad.

The American public just can't win. We are screwed beyond belief!

-dex



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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What normally is the determining factor in these cases is, was national security damaged to what extent. Your going to lose you clearance but, beyond that it is more a measure damage done. As most classified information that would be considered damaging would be things that revealed methods and sources. The content is normally out of date pretty quickly and not necessarily classified at all. And the the government has tendency to classify or over classify things just to be safe.

So in this case, no damage was done to national security and plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge of mishandling classified materials. For the military the question of him having and affair in uniform would have been the problem as adultery is crime under the UCMJ. It is rarely punished though.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

Your math is pretty good.

He should'a gone to jail though. The should've recalled him to active duty, busted him to E-1, and let him break rocks for ten or twenty years. If he's still breathing after that ... kick him to the curb with a dishonorable discharge.
edit on 222016 by Snarl because: Typo



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 02:06 AM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: schuyler

Your math is pretty good.

He should'a gone to jail though. The should've recalled him to active duty, busted him to E-1, and let him break rocks for ten or twenty years. If he's still breathing after that ... kick him to the curb with a dishonorable discharge.


The only charge against him while in the military would be adultery. So that would not happen. And the only charge against him post military was a misdemeanor charge of mishandling classified materials.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 04:07 PM
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originally posted by: MrSpad
And the only charge against him post military was a misdemeanor charge of mishandling classified materials.

Because that's all 'they' chose to charge him with. We both know he could've been sentenced to ten years on every count. It'd be a safe bet there was more than one count to charge him with.

Personally, I'd be more worried about what 'knowledge' he conveyed than the classified material.

Bottom Line: He knew better ... and did the bad thing anyway. If it was you or me spilling on these boards, we'd be tracked down, sent to jail, and shown no mercy.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 04:10 PM
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probation and fine seems just to me, i think he would agree. if we wanted perfect people in the military we would get machines because there is no such thing as a perfect person. and those that criticise others for not being perfect should take a good look at themselves before tossing their stones.

the intent and the outcome in this issue are important. if he leaked info on purpose, this would be a different discussion, if china would have gotten vital military info, this would have also been a different discussion. people shouldn't be punished because of "what ifs", but if they have a bad record of screwing up, that's also a different discussion.
edit on 2-2-2016 by vjr1113 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-2-2016 by vjr1113 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 04:32 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl

originally posted by: MrSpad
And the only charge against him post military was a misdemeanor charge of mishandling classified materials.

Because that's all 'they' chose to charge him with. We both know he could've been sentenced to ten years on every count. It'd be a safe bet there was more than one count to charge him with.

Personally, I'd be more worried about what 'knowledge' he conveyed than the classified material.

Bottom Line: He knew better ... and did the bad thing anyway. If it was you or me spilling on these boards, we'd be tracked down, sent to jail, and shown no mercy.


Well it would depend on what we were spilling and to whom. They always measure these things by damage done to national security. You tell your wife or girlfriend something fairly minor and it goes no further and you get caught, you get in minor trouble. compared to you release information exposing a source to the public at large that threatens that source. I have seen many of these over the years and this punishment seems consistent with others. Long ago before heading to class I just stayed late at work and did some studying instead of going home first. When I grabbed my stuff I grabbed some classified documents as well put them in my folder and went to class. Saw them in class and returned them after, thankfully not hitting a random bag search by security. If I had been caught they would have pulled my clearance by likely nothing more since no damage was done to national security.




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