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Time Dilation Throughout Space?

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posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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I was sitting down one day wondering about black holes being all over the universe, in far more abundance than was once thought. Then I wondered if planets closer to the center of our galaxy, The Milky Way, experience time slower compared to us on Earth since they are closer to our galaxy's black hole. Then I wondered if we traveled from one side of the universe to the other if we would be constantly be passing through different time dilations, compared to that of Earth. Not sure what my question is here, just want other people's thoughts on it.




posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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Mostly we seem to be locked into the grabitational fields of our galactic black hole, our local star, the large planets and the Moon. There isn't anything else to speed up or slow down time locally.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Sharted

Cool question. My guess would be yes. Verocity and gravity are the key points so if you get closer to bigger objects or move faster the clock ticks different.
But don't take my word for it, I am a total physics noob...



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

You don't really experience time, you perceive it.

Even if you traveled through "time dilation" your perception of the progression of time would not change, you'd age the at the same rate, while perhaps at home thousands of years would have passed and for you only days.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: ausername

And what about the atomic clocks on ISS? Their perception was wrong?



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:07 PM
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That's a good question.
And I personally think it will be entertaining to see members attempt to answer that.
I would expect an answer I could possibly take seriously, to such a question coming from a credited Cosmologist, Physicist.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

Send the ISS to the center of the galaxy and back, and check the clocks in comparison to the clocks and dates on earth for the answer.




posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: ausername

And what about the atomic clocks on ISS? Their perception was wrong?


No, but without clocks elsewhere to make a comparison, the question is moot. The only way you can tell there is a difference is if you compare the ISS clocks with those on earth.

So, if you were traveling through space, you'd never know.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:26 PM
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This is an interesting one.

Time appears to be a vaguely constant dimension for our galaxy, because the whole thing is being flung out from the center of the big bang [as the current theory states].

Now if we had a magic jump drive that we could jump to say the furtherest out galaxy in one direction we should notice that time passes more slowly than it does for us on earth, and the galaxies the other side of us (or indeed in any either direction) as we see it from out perspective, time may pass more quickly - the stinger is though we would only be able to compare and realise these shifts in time acceleration and deceleration once back on earth with all 3 atomic clocks compared to each other - they should all be different from when we used our magic jump drive to take the 2 to either "ends" of the universe.

This is the theory and im simply not smart enough to be able to argue any difference because this actually makes sense to me enough to comprehend it, just not to challenge it or argue with it and we dont have a magical jump drive to do the experiment, so theory it stays...


edit on b4343144 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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Human measurement and perception of time is extremely limited. Theoretical physics can offer some theoretical answers but we are, thankfully, far from complete understanding. Unfortunately, artificial intelligence will soon be able to vastly expand that understanding.

Perhaps it already has?




posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

Space-time isn't smooth.

Mass kneads space-time like it was bread dough.

The universe is all timey-wimey (to quote the Dr).

but the stronger effects of gravitation are somewhat local (gravity conforms to the inverse square law).


edit on 30/1/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

WARNING!The following statement may be utter rubbish:


Time and space are relevant to the observer.Should no observer be present,neither exist.Spacetime is a two-dimensional potentiality that becomes four dimensional when it is observed.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: Peeple
What is with the atomic clocks? "Their" perception was right. His argument stands. Think again.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: verschickter
A clock aboard the ISS would be out of sync with the period known as a day, or year for that matter, as measured by the motion of Earth around the Sun.

What that means, if anything, I don't know. Just wanted to throw that out there.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation




A clock aboard the ISS would be out of sync with the period known as a day, or year for that matter, as measured by the motion of Earth around the Sun.

It would also be out of sync with a clock on Earth's surface. It has nothing to do with the length of a day though. It has to do with the ISS being in a different frame of reference. If this was not done, the satellites would be useless.

That's why the clocks on GPS satellites are adjusted before launch, to compensate for time dilation.

The OP is correct. Time runs at a different rate in every different frame of reference. A lower gravitational field, time runs faster relative to a higher gravitational field. A higher velocity, time runs slower relative to a lower velocity. Time is relative.


edit on 1/30/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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I appreciate that time would pass normally for the person traveling, perhaps via a craft of some sort (obviously), but I mentioned in the OP that it would be compared to Earth time. It seems as though the black hole at the center of the Milky Way must have huge gravity since it is holding the galaxy together, so imagine traveling past many black holes on your journey through the universe. Relative to Earth your time would be constantly changing. I wonder if this is something we should consider if we are ever to travel intergalactically. Perhaps someone on the secret space program could assist?



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation

It means that what "ausername" wrote:



Even if you traveled through "time dilation" your perception of the progression of time would not change, you'd age the at the same rate, while perhaps at home thousands of years would have passed and for you only days.


So for the clock, time runs normal but will be behind after clocks on earth (whose timing -for the clock itself- is also normal. But since there is time dilation, they offset over time.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: Sharted




I wonder if this is something we should consider if we are ever to travel intergalactically.

Yes. It would be. That's sort of the theme of the movie Interstellar. That's one thing they got right.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: DenyObfuscation



A clock aboard the ISS would be out of sync with the period known as a day, or year for that matter, as measured by the motion of Earth around the Sun.

It would also be out of sync with a clock on Earth's surface. It has nothing to do with the length of a day though. It has to do with the ISS being in a different frame of reference. If this was not done, the satellites would be useless.


Poppycock and balderdash. If special relativity’s time dilation calculates clock A to run slower than clock B then using the exact same formula clock B will also be running slower than clock A by just changing the location of the observer. So Einstein's time dilution explains an observational artefact not real time dilution.

Data Does Not Match Special Relativity Time Dilation

GPS systems arn't adjusted for time dilution here.

Pulsars not showing time dilution

edit on 30-1-2016 by glend because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: glend

If special relativity’s time dilation calculates clock A to run slower than clock B then using the exact same formula clock B will also be running slower than clock A by just changing the location of the observer.
No. Not the location. The frame of reference. You can change your location and not change your frame of reference. Well, technically just by the act of moving you are doing so. But you would need a really accurate clock to notice.



GPS systems arn't adjusted for time dilution
I don't know about time dilution. But the satellite clocks are indeed adjusted to account for time dilation. I'm pretty sure your source does not say what you think it does.

Since GPS receivers work in the time and not in the frequency domain, they handle the velocity, gravity, and acceleration shifts differently than dedbed above. First, each GPS space vehicle (SV) clock is offset from its nominal rate by about -4.45xlO-'O (= -38 microseconds per day) to allow for the relativistic offsets between the differences between the SV and the ground. Of this -38 microseconds per day, about -45 are due to the gravitational potential difference between the SV at its mean distance and the earth's surface, and +7 to the mean SV speed, which is about 3.87 kmlsec.

tycho.usno.navy.mil...



Pulsars not showing time dilution
That article and it is about quasars, not pulsars. But while we're talking about pulsars:
Pulsars Confirm Einstein’s Theories
www.universetoday.com...

That paper on quasars is interesting but it hardly discounts time dilation. It actually wonders why it does not seem to be observed in some quasars. It's based on the examination of light curves over time. It uses current assumptions about those light curves. Hawkins is the author of the paper:

The most straightforward scenario, according to Hawkins, is that we just don't understand how quasars evolve. After all, as the supermassive black holes powering these beasts gobble up matter and grow, the blinking may change. Since this explanation has its problems as well, further study is certainly needed to determine why such a theoretically simple experiment gives a not-so-simple-to-explain result.

news.discovery.com...

edit on 1/30/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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