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"Earth is actually 2 planets" Scientists conclude

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posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: EndOfDays77

You mean the thread that you refuse to answer questions to?

The one where you say the whole solar system is halted, yet we can still see all the planets are still moving?

The one where you took a formally debunked picture of a reflection on the ISS window and used it as proof?

You mean that one?




posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX

Dark matter. All 5 DM partcles, totally resistant to photons / light, (resists the photons that bind electrons to a nucleus) and create the effect we call gravity.


Thank you for the reply. I read Swann's (I think) thread about that the other night and found it pretty thought provoking.

Basically you'r saying that dark matter is pushing us towards the center of the Earth rather than gravity pulling on us... correct?



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: Bone75

I like that idea, and indeed it feels true

MUCH MORE does it feel like we are pushed down, than pulled.

I would like to see more on this topic.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: ParasuvO




MUCH MORE does it feel like we are pushed down, than pulled.

Not to me.

Hang a weight on a rubber band. Looks like it's getting pulled to me.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 08:33 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ParasuvO




MUCH MORE does it feel like we are pushed down, than pulled.

Not to me.

Hang a weight on a rubber band. Looks like it's getting pulled to me.


i like that DESPITE the spin we stay put on Earth, it is cool stuff , this gravity...



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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pushed or pulled to the center of a mass it is very interesting that we can roughly calculate its affect and test it out with the moon, planets with their moons, the Sun and asteroids.

As far as this theory goes, it would be hard to challenge it one way or another but it has always been taught, as far as I can remember, that the Earth was hit by a big object.
edit on 30-1-2016 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman
I find it strange that anyone would think it's a push. There was a member here promoting the idea of "The nether, an influx of dynamic aether resulting in a push''. If that's not an accurate quote it's damn close. I could never figure out why the force of a push from an external source would correlate to the mass of an object, such as the Earth for example.


edit on 30-1-2016 by DenyObfuscation because: nether pushed me



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

because "Theia"" is shorter than "That unnamed planet that smacked us like a cue ball six billion years ago and welded to Earth." Same reason we have names for long-extinct organisms. "Triceratops' is easier than "This big bison-like car-sized herbifor with a flat thing off the back of its head and pointy face-parts"



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 10:16 PM
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This isn't anything new, it's been speculated for years that our moon was created by a large collision with another planet.



posted on Jan, 30 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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Something has gone through our solar system and it had a dramatic effect because it turned the planet Uranus onto its side and Venus now rotates backwards in comparison to all the other planets. We also have a nasty gap between Mars and Jupiter filled with debris.

I wonder if any other planets are made up in a similar way to earth? Our planet is unique and teeming with life so who knows if this is because of how it eventually formed?



posted on Jan, 31 2016 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

I've read that the moon was created from this collision.



posted on Jan, 31 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: angeldoll

So i have a girlfrind (not a girlfriend as such, but shes a girl and shes my friend)
She allready did this some 3 years ago, calling her newborn daughter Theia.
She didnt know about the moon-thingy until I told her, and when I did she thought
it was super cool


how bout that





posted on Jan, 31 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: Bone75
a reply to: Phage

Where does the gravity come from to form a planet or moon in the first place?


You start off with the big bang. After a period of time when the universe was so hot, not even atoms could exist. Then after the universe expanded, the electron ands protons formed gas clouds of hydrogen. The remaining shock waves that traveled across the universe, caused these clouds to condense into huge fast lived stars that performed fusion until they had so much iron they could not maintain the fusion process went supernova. That sent out elements out in every direction that formed new smaller and longer-lived stars and planets. In some places now there are stars that have a solid core of made from diamond.

news.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Jan, 31 2016 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Phage
I have always been curious, do believe in God? I, personally, don't know.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 04:16 AM
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This was already known in ancient times if I recall correctly. Just look up G.I.Gurdijieff and his 'Beelzebub's tales to his grandson'. I always wondered where he found this information as he only mentions investigating ancient manuscripts while touring monasteries and libraries around Asia as his sources. This was way before Sitchin was even born. This proves how little we actually know in these modern times...



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 04:22 AM
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If gravity were "pushing" things towards the centre of the Earth, then presumably it would be a stronger force further away from the Earth's core (because the force would be external, acting downwards).

We know that gravity is slightly weaker at the top of Everest than at sea level, yes?

So imagine a weight, say 1 metre across but, oh...37, 000 metres tall.

Now, if you measure the gravity at the base and at the top of that weight, you will see that the base is subject to a stronger gravitational effect.

I think that should settle, a, where the force comes from and b, whether it is a pull or push.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Seems a very apt description to me.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: Shiloh7
Something has gone through our solar system and it had a dramatic effect because it turned the planet Uranus onto its side and Venus now rotates backwards in comparison to all the other planets. We also have a nasty gap between Mars and Jupiter filled with debris.

I wonder if any other planets are made up in a similar way to earth? Our planet is unique and teeming with life so who knows if this is because of how it eventually formed?


That's a great observation
and I wouldn't doubt it. Makes you wonder what the early Solar System looked like, and what would have caused such events. Did something pass through? Was the Solar System overcrowded? ...



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: Phage

main stream news said they found a new planet that seems similar to "nibiru"
www.cnn.com...



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: CosmicSmack
Similar in what way? Sitchin's fictional planet is said to come into the inner solar system wreaking its havoc every 3600 years.

Your source says

That means "it would take this new planet between 10,000 and 20,000 years to make just one full orbit around the sun," according to Caltech.


I don't see the similarity.



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