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Whoaaaaa Duuuuud, Waves of up to 50 feet pound Hawaii's North Shore

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posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 07:27 AM
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Having been a surfer my entire adult life, I appreciate nice set, and 4- 7 feet are ride up my ally.. Holy smokes, 50 foot waves! !

Man, that is a five story building!! The ocean has a mind of its own, and in 3 from waves, I've been knocked down pretty bad, it's great to be up and when you're down you see what you're made of, .... Perhaps to put it in perspective,




In a big wave wipeout, a breaking wave can push surfers down 20 to 50 feet (6.2 m to 15.5 m) below the surface. Once they stop spinning around, they have to quickly regain their equilibrium and figure out which way is up. Surfers may have less than 20 seconds to get to the surface before the next wave hits them. Additionally, the water pressure at a depth of 20–50 feet can be strong enough to rupture one's eardrums. Strong currents and water action at those depths can also slam a surfer into a reef or the ocean floor, which can result in severe injuries or even death.
source



The biggest waves in a decade are pounding Hawaii's North Shore.

Visitors and locals alike marveled in their wake -- 40 to 50 feet high at Oahu, according to the National Weather Service.

"It's crazy," Peter Panais of Canada told CNN affiliate KHON. "Honestly, these are probably the biggest waves I've ever seen in my entire life."


S U R F S UP DUDE




posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 07:35 AM
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Did they measure them laying down ? 50 ft?



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 07:39 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

Isen't there a name for that like.... TSUNAMI!!!! ..



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: Spider879

It is actually caused by El Niño, thats why I put it in 'fragile earth' - I would have loved to just witness this. (but I am a beach junkie and surf fanatic) so I, probably am more interested then the average Joe/Jane. Never-the-less, mother earth never ceases to amaze me



thanks for posting,





posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: ReadLeader
a reply to: Spider879

It is actually caused by El Niño, thats why I put it in 'fragile earth' - I would have loved to just witness this. (but I am a beach junkie and surf fanatic) so I, probably am more interested then the average Joe/Jane. Never-the-less, mother earth never ceases to amaze me



thanks for posting,



I love me some beach life also but I like my waters a lil less rough..



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Spider879

My latest love is my 12 ft stand up paddle board!!! man, it is kewl, not a whole lot of speed unless you incorporate with the surf, but in the gulf on a nice smooth day w/out wind, the core work out is fa-nominal!!!!

the dolphins will sometimes chime in and lead or follow





posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

Not unheard of at all on the North Shore during the winter time--that's what it's famous for at this time of year, although El Nino weather patterns may be making them a bit bigger on average, maybe.

I'd love to visit there in the winter and check them out. When I was on Oahu last summer I took my son out boogie boarding on Makapu'u Beach, and the waves were probably in that 4'-7' range that you mention, and my son thought they were the biggest waves ever. I can't imagine being in the water with a 20' wave, let alone a 50' one--the power in a wave like that is ridiculous!

I love Hawai'i--my wife and I have plans to move there within five years, after we're out of debt and save up at least a year's worth of living expenses for being on the island. Hopefully that comes to fruition, but who knows what the future has in store...but in any event, we're hoping that we won't have to live on Oahu, but that's probably going to be where the jobs are.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

Wow - I hope we're going to see some ludicrous surf videos come out of this. We were having fun with the kids with the "big waves" which would occasionally roll in on Lake Superior this summer. Some of them were upwards of 3½ feet high!



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

I was expecting something close to this, maybe a little bigger...




I don't know how they measure the size of a wave, but the video they showed just looks like choppy water waves from an incoming storm.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Sounds like the same plan I have (in 2 yrs) but Ill still be in the U.S



thanks for posting



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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originally posted by: Spider879
Isn't there a name for that like.... TSUNAMI!!!! ..

That's what I was thinking...

How often do 50 foot waves show up in Hawaii anyway?

I was stationed on a Navy frigate that got hit by one of those once.

The captain was on the bridge and saw this massive wave heading toward the ship and he yelled at the helmsman to turn into the wave but it was too late and it hit us broadside.

I was on the way from the bridge to the dining hall and when I got there all of the food was on the floor.

One officer told me later that we nearly capsized.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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originally posted by: LSU0408
a reply to: ReadLeader

I was expecting something close to this, maybe a little bigger...




I don't know how they measure the size of a wave, but the video they showed just looks like choppy water waves from an incoming storm.


In Hawaii they measure from the back of the wave so the faces were probably higher than 50 feet.

50 feet hawaiian style is death lol.

That pic looks like the 100 footer from Portugal, probably a 70 foot swell I'm thinking, IMO the waves break much faster, steeper, and with more power on the hawaiian north shores than many other places.

As gnarly as that is, I believe that surfer got a hard time for "riding the shoulder", the easiest part of any given wave to navigate, plus that wave doesn't really pitch the lip and break heavy.

Not saying I wouldn't be utterly petrified in those waters, before I died.

Just waves are dynamic.


edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)


ETA: looking again I don't think that was the 100 foot ride, but I am pretty sure it's the same surf spot.
edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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Thanks for posting this OP!

I lived on Kauai for a bit and saw some heavy sets. A 30 ft set was mind blowing.

As a fellow wave junkie I wish I could see those monsters with my own eyes. From the beach of course, anything over six feet and Im in over my head.

The tow surfers must have had an epic time. Are the waves still breaking?
edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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Double post
edit on 29-1-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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Eddie would ride it



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:37 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK

originally posted by: LSU0408
a reply to: ReadLeader

I was expecting something close to this, maybe a little bigger...




I don't know how they measure the size of a wave, but the video they showed just looks like choppy water waves from an incoming storm.


In Hawaii they measure from the back of the wave so the faces were probably higher than 50 feet.

50 feet hawaiian style is death lol.

That pic looks like the 100 footer from Portugal, probably a 70 foot swell I'm thinking, IMO the waves break much faster, steeper, and with more power on the hawaiian north shores than many other places.

As gnarly as that is, I believe that surfer got a hard time for "riding the shoulder", the easiest part of any given wave to navigate, plus that wave doesn't really pitch the lip and break heavy.

Not saying I wouldn't be utterly petrified in those waters, before I died.

Just waves are dynamic.



ETA: looking again I don't think that was the 100 foot ride, but I am pretty sure it's the same surf spot.


I'm not well versed on waves so I haven't a clue. That's what I was picturing with a 50 foot wave lol. I'm over here thinking 4 or 5 story building high. Thanks for clearing it up



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:38 AM
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Not big enough for the Eddie meet.
quiksilver.com...

BTW, surf height forecasts do not use the "Hawaiian method" of measurement. Depending on conditions, a 50' face could be considered a 25' wave.

edit on 1/29/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

I lived in Hawaii for 3 years, when my husband was station in Kaneohe bay back in the late 80s my son was born in Honolulu, I remember the waves and the competitions, we used to go a watch the surfers, I remember that in certain times of the year the waves where monstrous that's when surfers were right there ridding the waves, I never understood the thrill of been pounded by the waves but darn, it was awesome.

But then again we have the same kind of waves episodes in my Island of PR during certain times of the year, no as powerful as Hawaii but nerveless has become a haven for surfers too.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: LSU0408

It was like that, the footage used was probably old.
Check this one out vimeo.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

This video may be more relevant vimeo.com...




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