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English teenagers 'are most illiterate in the developed world', report reveals

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posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:17 AM
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Young people aged between 16 and 19 have been found to possess only a “basic” grasp of maths and English, with nine million people of working age having low literacy or numeracy skills. The report, conducted by the OECD (the Operation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) found that out of 23 developed nations, English teens had the lowest literacy rates and the second to lowest numeracy rates.

www.independent.co.uk... ml


Well this is a bit embarrassing. Thank god for auto correct. I don't really know why this is the case and the article doesn't really go onto explain why. I'm sure many will put it down to reliance on technology, but it must be something more fundamental than that.

I remember my English teachers were never that great I remember getting a B grade and C in my English GCSEs, but still never felt that confident in my teachers. I think these things probably start at home and if you don't have books around you and not encouraged to read, your always going to have problems. www.independent.co.uk... ml

When I was volunteering at a youth club, I was always shocked at the poor standard some of the kids had both with English and maths




posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:32 AM
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Yes probably because our schools are full to breaking point. In some schools English is a second language for many. Teaching assistants who were originally employed to help struggling British children now have most of their time taken up helping children who have just arrived and dont speak any English. British children are just left to fall further behind.

Also because of cuts things like dyslexia arent being picked up sooner as teachers are struggling with classes of 30 children and dont have the time to give individuals one on one time and by the time it is picked up on it is too late and appointments to be diagnosed are few and far between.

Why do I know this because my niece is Deputy Head at a school in London where 80% of pupils arent British born and a lot dont speak English and where metal detectors are on doors to stop children bringing weapons into schools and my other niece is a teaching assistant specialising in special needs and dyslexia but all her time is taken up eith children who are newly arrived. Two of my friends are also teachers and say the same.

But hey we have now said we will take anothet 3,000 children as well as 20,000 plus family members. Just let the world in and sod British children afterall they are second class citizens now dont you know.😅a reply to: woodwardjnr




posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:42 AM
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a reply to: woodwardjnr

As a generalist of the first order, I suggest that there is a definite link between the cited deficiencies in the UK youngsters and the ever-growing trend of a certain four-letter word that is frequently inserted into sentences to intone meaning and substantial thought.

I've also noticed that disease of mind--which is where I place it even though its roots lay elsewhere--also consumes these days an overly large share of the younger US population's brain regions that maintain terms for enhancing utterances. 'Tis a pity. That word used to have real meaning and utility.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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Murica. We aints #1.


I find this somewhat surprising. How much of this has to do with the influx of immigration you are experiencing and the possibility that a sampling of the subjects did not grow up with the language?



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:47 AM
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a reply to: woodwardjnr
One factor could be the effect of trendy political attitudes on fashions in education.
Such as the renunciation of discipline, and the idea that you musn't tell pupils that they've got anything wrong.
I read the story of one school inspector who discovered a school with quiet classes, where pupils were listening to the teachers, and gave a sharp rebuke; "The next time I come, I want to hear a school full of noise and laughter".
In the modern world, if pupils don't want to learn, nobody is allowed to push them.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:49 AM
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There was an article on GMTV this morning regarding abuse by children to their teachers. The guy - who's name I cannot remember now - put this down to parenting. I suspect there might be similar things going on around our kids' illiteracy.

Now, I'm a bit old-fashioned when it comes to this stuff. And I know I'm going to get flamed but... discipline, discipline, discipline. Get them to buckle down and learn. Teach them respect.

EDIT: Ah, Disraeli got in before me

edit on 2912016 by MrCrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

I did a quick search here

en.wikipedia.org...

And UK immigration is in line with other developed countries, so blame it to immigrants all you like but clearly its a UK system problem.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:56 AM
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The English have never been the brightest...Thick as ####.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:56 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


Murica. We aints #1.


I find this somewhat surprising. How much of this has to do with the influx of immigration you are experiencing and the possibility that a sampling of the subjects did not grow up with the language?



We had a great School system once. Then the Libitards wrecked it by ditching Grammar schools and adopted a US state school system....... As you can see it hasn’t worked out well....

And lets not go into the scrapping of the polytechnic colleges and making anywhere a "university" that offers micky mouse degree in things like "Golf management" and "David Beckham" studies that have no practical value.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:58 AM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol
The English have never been the brightest...Thick as ####.


Almost as thick as a nation that want their "freedom" only to hand their sovereignty over to EU bureaucrats

edit on 29-1-2016 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:58 AM
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I would much prefer to listen to the views of teachers than Wikipedia thanks.a reply to: Indigent

I note your figures on immigration dont take into account the language spoken by the immigrants, they also dont take into consideration that UK is heavily populated compared to America, they also dont take into consideration the amount of schools and class sizes in different countries and what infrastructure they have in place to deal with high immigration but you believe these figures show anything!

edit on 29-1-2016 by anxiouswens because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:59 AM
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a reply to: Indigent
I think you're right. I was at primary school alongside my parents' pupils, so I learned at first hand how much the English child resents being educated (as well as resenting other people being educated).



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 05:59 AM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

And lets not go into the scrapping of the polytechnic colleges and making anywhere a "university" that offers micky mouse degree in things like "Golf management" and "David Beckham" studies that have no practical value.


'Golf Management' is important. Where else would you learn how to dodge a club wielded by your pissed off Scandinavian wife after she found out you were cheating on her?



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:02 AM
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a reply to: Indigent
I don't think we can blame immigrants for this one, when many of the European immigrants from countries like Poland and other Eastern European countries speak and understand English better as a 2nd language than English kids who've had the benefit of free education and growing up in the culture all their lives.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:02 AM
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Don't worry guys, just move out of the UK and apply for work in the U.S.
Everyone knows that if you have a British accent we will assume you are smart cause you know; "You talk Fancy."



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: Punisher75
That ought to depend on which British accent.
There are dozens of them, and some of them would not impress even Americans.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:05 AM
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The school where my niece works are mainly from Somalia and not Europe as is the case with friends of mine they are teaching children who dont speak English.a reply to: woodwardjnr



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens
I think what you're describing is an additional factor which exacerbates the problem.
It certainly isn't the sole and root cause.



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: Punisher75
That ought to depend on which British accent.
There are dozens of them, and some of them would not impress even Americans.



Apprently I sould like Hugh Grant to my American friends so I guess that means instant job as CEO of a bank! Woooo!



posted on Jan, 29 2016 @ 06:10 AM
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www.thetimes.co.uk...

www.telegraph.co.uk...
Migrant-children-who-dont-speak-English-are-changing-the-character-of-Britains-schools-Iain-Duncan-Smith-says.html

Two sources that back up what I am saying and these are old sources. Since these another 600,000 have come into the Country and now we are bringing more children in.



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