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Wounded Warrior Project Spends Lavishly on Itself, Insiders Say

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posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:25 PM
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Wounded Warrior Project Spends Lavishly on Itself, Insiders Say

There have been several allegations made within the past year that Wounded Warrior is less a charity and more a self-enriching scam. Now an insider with the project has come forward with additional allegations:


Since its inception in 2003 as a basement operation handing out backpacks to wounded war veterans, the charity has evolved into a fund-raising giant, taking in more than $372 million in 2015 alone — largely through small donations from people over 65.

...

Today, the charity has 22 locations offering programs to help veterans readjust to society, attend school, find work and participate in athletic endeavors. It contributes millions to smaller veterans groups. And it has become a brand name, its logo emblazoned on sneakers, paper towel packs, peanut butter cups and television commercials that run dozens of times per day.

But in its swift rise, it has also embraced aggressive styles of fund-raising, marketing and personnel management that have caused many current and former employees to question whether it has drifted from its original mission.

It has spent millions a year on travel, dinners, hotels and conferences that often seemed more lavish than appropriate, more than four dozen current and former employees said in interviews. Former workers recounted buying business-class seats and regularly jetting around the country for minor meetings, or staying in $500-per-night hotel rooms.


It currently spends 40% of it's donations on "overhead," IMO an already excessive amount that makes this less a charity and more a for-profit business. That number is predicted to go higher as the organization continues to embrace a jet-setting corporate attitude.




posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

Not that I can confirm or deny these allegations but at one time this was the largest charity my lodge gave to. One of the members of my lodge was very active in the charity and advised us to donate our money elsewhere due to similar anecdotes as outlined in your Original Post. We now give both our time and money to a local veterans charity instead.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

If there is one rule of thumb with regard to charity it is this; don't donate to organizations that advertise.

I'm sure anyone who would donate to them can find a bona fide veteran close to them who they can help directly.
edit on 27-1-2016 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

That's been our experience at the local VFW too. We give only to local charities or through ourselves, we do not give anything to national charities, they all seem to be corrupt.
edit on 27-1-2016 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:32 PM
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Where the carcass is softest....there, the jackals will gather.....
It sucks but seems a universal phenomenon......
Organisations tend to go this way too often.....From cancer research to save the childrens lunch....or whatever...
A certain personality type inevitably sneaks in to gorge on the spoils....
edit on 27-1-2016 by bandersnatch because: (no reason given)

I often think a lot of situations could be dealt with more directly....
Take the Iraq war for instance.....it cost us billions more to kill and maim a million Iraqis and destroy completely their entire infrastructure, as well as killing off our sons and daughters.....
We could easily have given them each a half million $ and saved money and lives as well as gained friends for life....
Plus all those neavu riche would have dumped Sadam themselves....

edit on 27-1-2016 by bandersnatch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: greencmp


If there is one rule of thumb with regard to charity it is this; don't donate to organizations that advertise.


Good tip, I'm going to pass that along verbatim.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:34 PM
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Many things altruistic evolve to a state of greed.

At the end of the day you're either all about helping veterans, of which there are a great many...
Or you're half arsed and all about lining your own pockets.

Caviar and first class for yourself or board and bedroom for the needy?
If it's an element of both at least have the common f#ing decency to admit it though.


Overhead, lulz

$500-per-night hotel rooms.


People on the f#ing streets who fought for their freedom to begin such a "cause" must be elated to hear that their "betters" are fattening their fat heads.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

There have been some scandals with this company and it's actual "contributions" versus $400K salaries for execs and not making as much of a difference as they might lead people to believe. However, they do handle hundreds of millions of dollars annually, so higher salaries are to be expected (HOWEVER, is this an organization that is really making all the difference they say they do. that's the question)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:42 PM
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Anybody sucking down 400K out of charity money needs replacing....



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

Yeah, my wife and I used to like them quite a bit until we did some research into what vets were actually saying who have interacted with the organization. Yes, they have done some good, but not near as much as they can and not nearly as much as they should concerning the amount of money they bring in. I have since disregarded them as a very useful organization, and I certainly have removed any stickers or magnets associated with them that I used to have on my vehicle. I have also quit doing Tough Mudders, who are sponsored by/benefactors of them (only partially because of the affiliation).

Like many say, I'd prefer to do hands-on donations now, like building ramps for wounded veterans, or donating to local organizations that do things like sponsor service dogs for them--I'd love to be able to pay to do one of the Honor Flights, but that's later down the road.

Anyhoo, I don't think that this is much of a revelation to those of us paying attention over the years. I do think that they began with great intentions, but have since lost their way.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 06:13 PM
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Its been said already and I already live by avoiding donating to large corporate mega charity type organizations and try to help locally and with people I actually know who may need a little help here and there. It makes me feel good if I can help a decent blue collar working family pay half a month's rent because the holidays hit the bank a little hard with two children. I see the gratitude and appreciation instead of believing in a hope and a prayer that my 30 cents a day is going where its supposed to be going.

Oh and I want to add that I know of a house with a WW sign in the yard and this house is lived in and been under construction for way too long now like years I think and no progress being made, no funds in the budget I guess. I think about it when I drive past it and how I have heard from people while I was enlisted that WW was a scam.
edit on 27-1-2016 by RainbowPhoenix because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 06:31 PM
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Not surprised at all. Once you get that sort of money rolling in, it's hard not to take advantage of it. Humans are a greedy bunch.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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A lot of charities spend the majority on themselves. Many are also scams that rarely benefit the cause.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer
Found this report from CBS. Other charities spend upwards of 95% on the veterans.

WWP? About 60%


This is criminal and the executives should be prosecuted.

But we know they never will be.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

People really have to research charities before they donate. Too many charities have been caught giving a very small percentage of their donations to the actual cause. I think most charities start out with good intentions, but when the donation start to increase exponentially, they start dipping into the proceeds for their own selfish reasons.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:34 PM
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Seems like when most charities start pulling in a ton of cash, they become bloated at the top. The money is flowing and the executives start living large.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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They also have to pay for lawyers as they love suing the sh# out of smaller veteran oriented charities. So typical.

www.thedailybeast.com...



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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40% is not that much. It's actually about average.
www.thenonprofittimes.com...

BBB recommends they spend 35% on overhead.

I would never donate to a charity, money doesn't get to where you want it to.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04
Interesting point.

From your source:


The WGA recommends fundraising costs not exceed 35 percent of related contributions, but Weiner suggested that the public look at more than just the statistics. “Ratios in general can result in false positives,” he said. “You may have an organization with excellent numbers, but it may not have good governance, or have much of an impact with its mission. That’s one of the limitations of looking at finances alone.”
In 2015: $372 million in donations. At 40% overhead that leaves $223 million for services. So the question to ask is: Are the wounded warriors getting the benefit of those funds?

-dex



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