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Let's see just how "non-PC" you truly are

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posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Boadicea

No complaints from me on any point.

Personal note: I'm appalled by what's apparently going on in Oregon.

How utterly stupid that this had to end in death ... whatever "side" of the issue one supports!

... and you're right. I'm not by any means a pacifist, but I am utterly disgusted by pointless violence ... and almost all of it, these days is pointless.

Thanks for being patient and actually chatting with me!




posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Boadicea

Personal note: I'm appalled by what's apparently going on in Oregon.

How utterly stupid that this had to end in death ... whatever "side" of the issue one supports!

... and you're right. I'm not by any means a pacifist, but I am utterly disgusted by pointless violence ... and almost all of it, these days is pointless.


Exactly.


Thanks for being patient and actually chatting with me!


Always a pleasure -- and for that I thank you!



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:27 AM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
1. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?


Both. I would appreciate the fact that the owner of said establishment can fire his/her employee for whatever reason they deem fit. I'm also intelligent enough to know that just because someone might have the right to say something, that doesn't mean that there aren't consequences. But I would absolutely defend his right to free speech, but remind him that when you agree to work for someone else and represent their brand, you are expected to act appropriately. And if the store owner decided that his actions were appropriate, I would take my business elsewhere and let my friends/family know about that particular stores philosophy, as I have a right to speak out on that.

But I would not lobby for him to keep his job, as that is up to the employer and should not be a decision that is influenced by political correctness or outside demands.



2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?


See above concerning my point about a right to say things, but also having appropriate consequences.

I would say something because I am a decent human being. That has nothing to do with political correctness, but it has to do with decency, maturity, and kindness. Of course, this is all assuming that the victim is just sitting there acting defenseless--I would, of course, give them to opportunity to defend themself, first.

No matter what you're trying to say with your loaded questions, it's not political correctness that would make someone defend another person being bullied, and in a case like this, political correctness is not even a factor.



3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?


Again, see above. Just because I am against political correctness doesn't give everyone the right to verbally assault me without consequence.

I'm starting to think that you have a misunderstanding of what political correctness is.

In fact, I know you do, if you think that these scenarios represent a PC/non-PC split in available responses.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey
I think you might be on to something.
The concept of being Politically correct vs Not being PC I think was lost somewhere along the line.

Political correctness is at the end of the day, what the zeitgeist of the moment is.
For example;

Saying "Homosexuality is wrong" in 2016 is not politically correct.
Saying "Homosexuality is wrong" in 1976 would be politically correct.

In short, What is politically correct is the most vocal truth claim among the population.



edit on 27-1-2016 by Punisher75 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
None of these are issues of 'political correctness', as far as I'm concerned.

1) First, its not a free speech issue. A private business has the right to set certain standards of personal behavior in the workplace and if the employee violates those standards, that employment can be terminated. In this particular case, I'd probably tell the manager, because if the employee does that to me, they may be doing it to other customers as well. Whether the store fires them is their concern, though their decision might affect whether I continue to do business there.

2) Again, its not a free speech issue. The mall is private property and if someone is being loud, obnoxious, disruptive, etc, and potentially driving away other customers, the owners of the property can have them removed. As for my reaction, I'd probably mind my own business and keep walking. The heckler is doing a good enough job of making himself look like a fool in front of everyone as it is.

3) Most likely, I'd inform that person that no one gives a damn what he thinks and treat that person accordingly by ignoring any else they might say.


edit on 27-1-2016 by vor78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Punisher75

Yeah, but it's not even that as much as the OP has his/her whole idea of political correctness bass ackward, and completely disregards the "moral compass," for lack of a better term, that guides human decency.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1


1. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?


That depends entirely upon the wishes of the owner of the bar.

All humans have the right of free association. We all have the right to discriminate with whom we will associate. This includes having the right to choose who we will do business with, regardless of our role--whether we are in the role of customer or merchant.

That being said: the ultimate decision in the matter rests solely with the owner of the store. If the owner agrees with the employee, and it is part of their policy not to serve me, then I take my business elsewhere. Forcing them via government to serve me is childishly petty, and an infringement of human rights--I would be forcing them to associate with me.

If the owner does not agree with the employee and fires him, it is his right to do so.
If the owner agrees with the employee and keeps him, it is his right to do so.

if the employee doesn't like any given policy, he can find another business to work for (exercise his own right to freely associate).

This is more than a free speech issue. This is about using government to trample the rights of humans to freely associate. If you say something that I don't like, I don't have to associate with you.

Government forced segregation was wrong.
Government forced integration is wrong.

Both of the above remove the individual's autonomy.


2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?


I would defend the right of the person doing the heckling to say what they wish. The moment that the obese person asks the heckler to leave him alone, I will defend the right of the obese person to freely associate--and in this instance--to end the association.


3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?


If my friends are verbally defending me, then everyone is practicing their right of freedom of speech, and everyone has the right to do so. If they're trying to get fisticuffs with someone for words, then my friends would need to back-down.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1

This thread is aimed at those who are against political correctness, though others can join in if they like.

I'm going to post a few hypothetical scenarios and I'd like those who are "non-PC" to answer truthfully.

1. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?

A: Shop elsewhere, yes it is his right be speak his mind, but it is also my right to ignore that jack wagon and shop elsewhere.

2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?

A: Laugh at both of the tools and move on.

3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?

A: Fire back or if they have a few good insults laugh, everyone loves a good roast.

Please answer truthfully to these, I'm interested in what you answers will be. How "non-PC" are you truly? Are you only "non-PC" when it suits your agenda or when the comments aren't aimed at you or your demographic in particular?



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:43 AM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1




1. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?


I'd bloody clip him mate. While I sing him the Antarctican national anthem.




2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?


I'd ask the fatty to defend its weight by racing it against another fatty. Loser gets sent to a labour camp. After a while they won't be fat anymore. Who's the winner now!? This is my Final Solution.




3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?


I'd bloody clip him mate.

If I saw anyone defending someone who insulted them on the basis that "all opinions are equal" (which they're not, they're f*cking not), I would bloody well clip him.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1



. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?


One, he/she is being a rude person, and not really doing their job, are they? Has little to do with "PC'ness". Free speech doesn't come equipped with free from consequences. I'd let their boss know, and he/she takes it from there. They keep 'em on? I take my business elsewhere, and hey, free advertising for the business, too.


2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?


Yes I would. What right does this individual have to bully someone? That's not "freedom of speech", save by the very loosest of definitions. I have serious issues with bullies of any ilk. Not to mention I'm practising my freedom of speech, aren't I?


3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?


I'd let them. Just as I'd defend them from this person. Or, as I said above, free speech doesn't mean no repercussions from exercising those rights. Attempting to bully me is a losing proposition from the get-go, you'll get very little satisfaction.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 02:44 AM
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a reply to: Volchitsa

Does Antarctica have a national anthem???



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 03:48 AM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1


1. You walk into a store and ask for help, the employee looks you in the eye and says that he doesn't want to help someone like you, that you make him sick, etc. Would you agree with the employer to fire him, or would you defend his right to free speech and lobby for him to keep his job?

Customer service. He should be fired for being rude.


2. You are walking in the mall and notice someone walk up to an overweight person and start heckling them about their weight in front of hundreds of other people. Would you step in and defend the overweight person or would you defend the heckler because he has a right to say what he is saying and because he is being "non-PC"?

If I got involved it would be to defend the person, not the heckler. Because while they have free speech, I do too.


3. Someone you know but do not like very much comes up to you and starts insulting you in front of your friends. Your friends step in and try to defend you, do you stop them and defend the person who is talking smack about you because what they are saying is "non-PC"?

My friends seem to have it under control.

I don't find any of these to be PC vs. non-PC though to be honest.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 03:54 AM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
a reply to: queenofswords

They are examples of people saying things that may offend others, so yes they are examples of non-PC speech.


No, these are examples of people offending others, that doesn't meant in any case "pc", it means they are assholes.

You don't understand, someone being offended because you don't believe the same as they do is not being politically incorrect, offending someone because of their race or religion, like saying "towel head" to muslims or "bean eater" to mexicans is offensive.

You don't seem to get it. What do you believe "non PC" means? i'm finding it hard to understand your approach to this matter.

Are you possibly entirely looking at this from a north-american point of view? to be honest, i don't get you.
edit on 28-1-2016 by WarriorMH because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 03:57 AM
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What is being "politically correct" then?

We've heard from one member earlier who said that only liberals are politically correct; what is the consensus opinion?



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

Well thats stupid. Anyone can be. Liberals are just more likely to be, and to push the PC agenda.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 04:14 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Gryphon66

Well thats stupid. Anyone can be. Liberals are just more likely to be, and to push the PC agenda.


No disagreement from me that anyone who is political can attempt to require political correctness.

So, what is "PC" in your opinion ... we always talk about it, but rarely say what we think "it" is.

Workable definition.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 04:30 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

It's the idea that you must go beyond mere good manners and almost wrap everyone and everything in bubble wrap for fear of offending anyone the slightest bit. It usually does not extend to those who have a different viewpoint, for example a liberal finds it terrible to say anything offensive about a minority, and hilarious to make fun of rednecks. (disclaimer I am not advocating all liberals find that hilarious, it's an example of a possible PC liberal)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 04:43 AM
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I believe in manners and kindness, not PC. Example.

I find a comedian rude and crass, I won't go see him.
PC finds a comedian rude and crass, no one should be allowed to see him.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: ShayVirus
Hypothetical scenario one:
He may have the right to free speech, and he has the right to refuse me service, just as his employer has the right to fire him. I wouldn't go out of my way to have the employee fired, but nor would I go out of my way to fight for him to keep his job. He was the one who chose to not perform his job because of his innate hatred toward a specific demographic of persons, if his employer sees fit to fire him for it, that is his bosses prerogative.

Hypothetical scenario two:
Again, the heckler has the right to free speech, but there is no need to be an asshole. To which I would politely explain to him.

Hypothetical scenario three:
This goes along with the previous scenario; yeah, the guy has the right to say what he wants, as long as it not infringing on my rights, or I don't feel as if I am being threatened, but again, there is no reason to be an asshole. To which I would let them know.



Almost word for word what my answers would be.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 05:26 AM
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a reply to: Squirlli

OP just does not seem to grasp the difference between being PC and not being a prick.



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