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Syrians feel 'hopeless' as government-sponsored refugees in Toronto, mother says

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posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 05:57 AM
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And so it begins...

The new Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, committed to bringing 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada before the end of 2015 (he was only elected in October, so that bold pledge did not leave him a lot of wiggle room). Since then, of course, he has had to back off on the schedule...but still over 10,000 Syrians have now arrived in the Country...and the word is that Trudeau is aiming to have as many as 50,000 refugees taken in during 2016.

And boy are these folks ever happy that Canada reached out across the globe to pluck them out of harm's way...at Canadian taxpayer expense of course - and set them on the road to a safe and secure future away from all of the middle-east's deadly turmoil and conflicts!

Well, maybe not so much...


Some government-sponsored Syrian refugees staying at a budget hotel in Toronto say they feel like they're "trapped in a prison" without hope due to a lack of communication, supplies and assistance.

Virginia Johnson, one of two volunteers working at the hotel, joined CBC Radio's Metro Morning on Monday to speak to host Matt Galloway.

Johnson said the refugees have been at the hotel for weeks and have no idea when they will be able to leave. Some of the 85 government-sponsored refugees say they're not getting much help, and would rather go back to their refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon.


Well, as they say, don't let the Hotel door hit you in the #$s on your way back out (but, of course, these folks would expect Canadians to pay their airfare back to Jordon/Lebanon as well).


"We were told that when we arrived to the hotel that we would only be staying for three to four days maximum. However, things have been changed and we've been here for 10 to 11 days, and we've been told it could be even longer. The problem is that we have kids and we would rather be outside in a settled house than sitting at a hotel," Abu-Rukti said.


Syrian Refugees Want More - Surprise!

Would you now...you would rather have have your own free house, instead of the free hotel accommodations being provided (along with free food, etc.). Well, we will just get right on that for you!

As a matter of fact, why not just call your best buddy Justin...you know the guy that made all these (bone-headed) hasty arrangements and showed up for the photo-op when the first plane arrived in Montreal, then went back to Ottawa to make sure his team of Nannies were looking after his kids properly (also at Taxpayers expense naturally).

As we have seen in Europe, it does not take very long for these "refugees" to go from gratitude (assuming they even pass this post), to whining, to anger, to demands for their "rights". And, unfortunately, the more people you bring in in any given time period, the less able the host nation is able to provide basic care and attention to each family (not to mention jobs to get them on their own feet and away from the public trough) - and the larger the population of newly arrived disgruntled "migrants".

In my opinion, Trudeau, along with Merkel and the rest of the EU crowd, and the U.S. (if Obama gets his way), are far better off using their economic and military might to create unassailable safe zones for the displaced populations in the Middle East (until they resolve the conflicts that created them)...spend their money on completely adequate shelter, food, medical care, etc. etc. in the safe zones.

But to bring thousands/millions of traumatized people thousands of miles...to cultures and environments that they do not understand, and do not really want to be in, creates far more problems in the long run than the ones we are trying to solve.

Shelter the affected people - where they are - end the wars, and then let the people go back home.

Bleeding hearts need to be tempered with functioning brains.




posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 06:17 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

At least they are really Syrian refugees and not just random people from other countries who pretend because they feel this is a great time to move.


+7 more 
posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 06:18 AM
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Bleeding hearts need to be tempered with functioning brains.


Good luck with that.
The bleeding hearts will cry for refugees to be brought in and cared for, the border to be open to all, but you don't hear a word about our own homeless and poor.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

Is there a housing shortage in Canada? Just curious.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 08:24 AM
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The refugees may not be used to nothern continental climate(dfb). Give them a brochure about seasonal depression, something they may never have heard of.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 08:42 AM
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originally posted by: TonyS
a reply to: mobiusmale

Is there a housing shortage in Canada? Just curious.


In Toronto, of the type they would be trying to provide for these folks, I would have to say...yes.

Some stats, from "The Homeless Hub" website:

Subsidized Housing Units available - 94,520
Waiting List for Subsidized Housing Units - 77,109
Apartment Vacancy Rate: 1.8%

Homeless Hub

There was talk (not sure if this is still in the mix) about opening up old military bases for temporary accommodations for the refugees...which would be sort of like just moving the refugee camps from Jordon/Lebanon to Canada - at only 10 times the cost no doubt.

Oh, and no word on what Hotel we are planning to put up the 447 Torontonians who are actually living on the streets right now...doubt the PM will show up for a photo-op with some of the Canadians living under bridges when it is -20 in February (while the poor refugees are $^&ing about the quality of their "budget" hotel rooms).



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: jellyrev
The refugees may not be used to nothern continental climate(dfb). Give them a brochure about seasonal depression, something they may never have heard of.


I am not sure what would be more depressing...losing my home (and maybe a few family members) to ISIS, Assaud's army, or some other marauding band - or having to deal with fewer hours of sunlight during the winter. Hmmm...

On a serious note, though, a big part of the problem in taking on such huge numbers (Canada has 1/10th the population of America, but is planning to bring in at least double the number of Syrian refugees), will be the lack of mental health facilities and professionals (who also speak their mother tongues and understand their cultures) to deal with the PTSD and other issues these people are going to be arriving with.

And...for Europe...just multiply this by about 40.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 09:32 AM
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originally posted by: TonyS
a reply to: mobiusmale

Is there a housing shortage in Canada? Just curious.


Affordable housing is non existent!



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 09:40 AM
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In part I agree with you, and sending aid to the camps and even contructing safe villages in Syria, near the government safe zones, would cost far less for the world to chip in funds for, than this. But we are getting real Syrian families, many who are reluctant to even come here, naturally. Back to the fund and construct safety for them close to their homes. And they were talked into this mostly. Anyone with lets say 3 kids, even 2, would find hotel accommodations really difficult at best. When we were forced into low cost townhouses, with my sons, we ate peanut butter sandwhiches and really substandard foods for a few months and built our own computers and got game systems, and zoned them upstairs and downstairs because the neighbors (who were part of their own disturbances that were corrupt and bizarre, involving their teen daughter and drugs and gangs of boys) complained nonstop that my sons, were making too much noise. And they do, but in a normal kid way. So I had to hook them onto video games that I don't approve of to try and zone them.

It's being said that there is too much leftist idealism and acceptance of the refugees. In reality, you need both a head and a heart working at the same time.

This situation isn't their fault. These people had their own homes not too long ago, but alas, our western governments funded Isis and tried to destroy their country.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 09:47 AM
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Did it possibly occur to you that these refugees may have cabin fever? I mean we are talking about a bunch of people who lived in a desert suddenly staying in a place that gets snowed in causing trouble getting around. They probably aren't used to being immobilized by the weather to such an extent.
edit on 26-1-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
Did it possibly occur to you that these refugees may have cabin fever? I mean we are talking about a bunch of people who lived in a desert suddenly staying in a place that gets snowed in causing trouble getting around. They probably aren't used to being immobilized by the weather to such an extent.


That's a cute sentiment and all, but Toronto has had virtually no snow at all so far this winter (they are located in Southern Ontario...not within the Arctic Circle...at roughly the same latitude as Eugene, Oregon).

New York, Boston and Washington DC are far more "snowed in" than Toronto...

At any rate, these people are free to leave their igloos (ie. Hotel), and take a dogsled (ie. Uber, taxi, bus, streetcar, subway) if they are feeling cooped up at all. And if they get lost, they can always rub some sticks together and send up a smoke signal...when the Fire Department shows up, they can likely get directions back to their igloo.






edit on 26-1-2016 by mobiusmale because: typo



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

Are they aware of these amenities? I'm pretty sure Syria doesn't exactly have access to things like that.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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This is just as stupid and boneheaded as those women who have 8 kids then cry when the government doesn't give them everything they want.
First, you figure out what resources you have then decide how many you can support.
Just the same as stopping at 2 kids because you know you can't afford it.
Grandstanding and popping off huge numbers like 50,000 sounds wonderful but in the real world will not work.
Of course politicians don't care, they'll just blame any problems on someone else instead of taking the responsibility for making the wrong decision in the first place.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: mobiusmale

Are they aware of these amenities? I'm pretty sure Syria doesn't exactly have access to things like that.


One would hope that the people who are doing the orientation for these people (for example, the article says there are two volunteers working at this particular Hotel alone) would have given them some indication...at least more than they could already see from their Hotel windows.

More daunting, likely would be the fact that...if/when they do venture out...if they do not speak or read English, they would be feeling pretty intimidated in trying to go shopping, or getting on a bus etc. They would likely also not be able to find their favourite kinds of food around every corner...so this would become quite stressful after a couple of days (especially if they have kids).



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

Yea, that seems more likely. It can be tough adjusting to a new locale, especially one so extremely different than the one you grew up in and just left. The "prison cells" they are speaking about could be self-imposed due to the culture gap.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:27 AM
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You're living your normal life with your family...until your home and work are bombed to ruins.
You and your family have nothing.
You all join the others, the 'refugees' who are fleeing.

You are lucky enough to receive aid from a foreign country...they send you and your immediate family there.
You don't speak the language.
You're not wanted there by many.

The new country is cold, damp or snowy and freezing!! Your home is warm.
But at least your alive, and you are with your family.

You have nothing. Everything you know/had/remember/love...is gone.
You must now start over.

OP Quote: " But to bring thousands/millions of traumatized people thousands of miles...to cultures and environments that they do not understand, and do not really want to be in, creates far more problems in the long run than the ones we are trying to solve."

Traumatized people.

I'm sorry, but to me this isn't about Trudeau or Canada. It's about traumatized people.

I'm most likely the "poorest" ($) person in this thread, and I'm in Canada.
I do not resent them and I hope they get a second chance...to be alive and raise their children.

jacy-of-the-bleeding-heart


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posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

You're not getting my sympathy by crying over spilled milk, It doesn't work for children and it doesn't work for adults either.

They don't like being sheltered indoors ? Well go live outside like the countless homeless people living in Toronto right now.

They should go take a stroll downtown, go see the homeless begging for money at union station, they might start to feel a bit better about their situation.

Or maybe we can relocate these ungrateful people back to where they want to go, and give those homeless people a place to stay..

Oh right I forgot..helping your fellow Canadian is not the right thing to do, we can only look good when we're helping on a grander scale, got it!


& for those of you who think i'm an asshole for writing that, and I'm sure you'll let me know, well I'm glad you think so because it means you didn't have to go through the # I have to become as cynical as I am today.


edit on 26-1-2016 by threeeyesopen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: threeeyesopen

In what way are they even mildly ungrateful? They were told of safety, not of having zero control over their own lives, weren't they? They are experiencing major culture shock.



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: Learningman
a reply to: threeeyesopen

In what way are they even mildly ungrateful? They were told of safety, not of having zero control over their own lives, weren't they? They are experiencing major culture shock.


Agreed.

The majority of them will get on their feet, because they're survivors....and they WILL be grateful for a second chance.
They will take the jobs that Canadians won't and live multi-generational in one home.

I am a first generation Canadian. My parents came from England...as did my first husband and his family.
My current partner's family came here from the Azores when he was 3. They didn't speak English and had never seen snow.

Every business I shop at locally employs Canadians who came from elsewhere.

Yes, a percentage of the refugees will turn to crime, just like a percentage of born-Canadians will turn to crime. (Funny, I know more shady Canadians than immigrants though.)



posted on Jan, 26 2016 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: jacygirl

Thing is I see where these cats come from, no cV||t cares about the homeless till its a choice between them or immigrants. Its a clucking shame. But I see no ungratefulness, I see moaning, as I'd expect.

Every nation, we all need to step up our care for the homeless, esp white males and veterans, the most at risk. But the left, of which i identify, seems not to care for those, but more for migrants. There is nothing to say you cant use the knowledge from both situations to improve methods.

Will always be the type of people that will jump on anyone, no matter how downtrodden, to make their point.



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