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Challenger Disaster Remembered: NatGeo Premiers "Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes" Jan 25th

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posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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Remembering the Challenger Disaster

 

National Geographic Channel Premiers
"Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes"
January 25, 2016


(The crew of Shuttle Challenger STS-51-L)



The Crew:
    - Commander: Francis R. Scobee (front-middle)
    - Pilot: Michael J. Smith (front-left)
    - Mission Specialist 1: Ellison S. Onizuka (rear-left)
    - Mission Specialist 2: Judith A. Resnik (rear-right)
    - Mission Specialist 3: Ronald E. McNair (front-right)
    - Payload Specialist 1: Gregory B. Jarvis (second from right-rear)
    - Payload Specialist 2: S. Christa McAuliffe (second from left-rear)



On January 28, 1986, Shuttle Mission STS-51-L was to be the first American space mission to carry a civilian on-board. 37-year-old Sharon Christa Corrigan McAuliffe was selected to be the first teacher (and civilian) in space as part of the Teacher in Space Project. It was to be an on-going project that would allow teachers to go into space to teach lessons from the space shuttle.

Out of 11,000 completed applications for the project, two teachers were selected: Christa McAuliffe, and Barbara Morgan as Christa's backup:

(Barbara Morgan - left, and Christa McAuliffe - right)




As most may know, 73-seconds into lift-off, the fuel tank ignited due to a leaking o-ring causing the tank and shuttle to explode, killing all on-board. Ice from unusually cold Florida weather earlier that morning was thought to be the culprit:





Tomorrow, January 25, 2016 at 9pm Eastern (GMT -5), just three days before the 30th Anniversary, National Geographic channel is premiering a documentary called "Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes".

A 3-minute preview of the documentary only available via Space.com can be seen here:

www.space.com...


Looks to be very interesting. Can't wait to see it. Everyone should be able to remember exactly where they were and what they were doing as the news came across TV and radio at that time.

More videos can be found on NatGeo's site here:

www.natgeotv.com.au...


I'll end with the following image, which is reminiscent of other tragedies throughout history:

(A piece of Shuttle Challenger's wreckage being lifted by crane.)





(Images courtesy of Challenger Remembered: Photos from NASA's Tragic Shuttle Disaster)




posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: _BoneZ_

Isn't there a conspiracy that 5 of them have twins and that one is still a professor? There still alive if I recall, nobody was on that shuttle hence adding to the "we never went to the moon"?



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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R.I.P the pioneers of space.

A very very sad day, looks like it will be a very interesting, albeit very difficult, watch.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: Cobaltic1978

Difficult to watch indeed. Just as there was in creating this thread was well.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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I remember watching it live on tv.

After watching several interviews with Christa and seeing how excited she was to be the first civilian going up in space, I too became excited for her and decided to watch the launch live.

When it exploded, I just sat there for a minute with my mouth agape not sure if what I was seeing was real or not.


A very sad day indeed.




posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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I was in high school when this happened and remember it well.
I also still believe nasa murdered those people. They knew it was not safe to launch.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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I was in middle school in Florida, was sitting outside watching it go up... when the explosion occurred ran into the cafeteria where they had it on tv to try and understand what we had just seen.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

The Morton Thiokol engineers were basically told to sit down and shut up at the pre launch conference call. They were screaming that it wasn't safe, but their higher ups gave in to the pressure to get it in space and gave the go ahead.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Bluntone22

The Morton Thiokol engineers were basically told to sit down and shut up at the pre launch conference call. They were screaming that it wasn't safe, but their higher ups gave in to the pressure to get it in space and gave the go ahead.


So, they sacrificed those poor souls in order to keep the interest in the Shuttle project?

Wow, I must admit, I did not know this, mainly because whilst it is up there with the top historical events in my lifetime, I have never had a reason to suspect a conspiracy with the event.


edit on 24/1/16 by Cobaltic1978 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: Cobaltic1978

They had seen previous launches where the o-Rings allowed venting, but it was fairly minor in those launches, so they decided that it would be safe to launch this time too. Some of the engineers disagreed, but were overridden.


A senior executive at Thiokol, Jerald Mason, commented that a management decision was required. The managers seemed to believe the O-rings could be eroded up to one-third of their diameter and still seal properly, regardless of the temperature. The data presented to them showed no correlation between temperature and the blowby gasses which eroded the O-rings in previous missions. According to testimony by Kilminster and Boisjoly, Mason finally turned to Bob Lund and said, "Take off your engineering hat and put on your management hat."

Joe Kilminster wrote out the new recommendation and went back online with the teleconference. The new recommendation stated that the cold was still a safety concern, but their people had found that the original data was indeed inconclusive and their "engineering assessment" was that launch was recommended, even though the engineers had no part in writing the new recommendation and refused to sign it.

www.engineering.com...
edit on 1/24/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
I was in middle school in Florida, was sitting outside watching it go up... when the explosion occurred ran into the cafeteria where they had it on tv to try and understand what we had just seen.


ha.
same thing with me. i still remember.
i was not in middle school though. was only 8 so still in elementary school.

we were all out on the school field watching it when it blew



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: _BoneZ_

Terrible tragedy,I was working partime in a supermarket when i heard the news.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Sad thing to read...

Prime example why safety of flight should always come first, second, and third on the checklist.

Politics should stay out of it, MC rates should stay out of it... never ever should it be acceptable to risk crew lives, short of it being in a war to save more lives, that should have never occurred.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: _BoneZ_

Good thread. I remember watching it live in 6th grade at school. 🙏😌
A very close relative in the cia gave me some paper work and a signed/autographed portrait of- Mission Specialist 1: Ellison S. Onizuka (rear-left) .

I was traumatised but highly interested in the event. As I got older I still watch this tragedy via the internet. Keep hearing in my head... "O"Ring over and over.

"Sigh" Then on February 1st 2003 we had STS-107.

Was fortunate to have an uncle that lived in Titusville Florida. At least I saw 2 return before the end of an era. 😌



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: _BoneZ_

A lot of people can't or didn't really grasp what went on in that hour.

Just think, first civilians to go up into space, two teachers, space program was still rather popular, millions around the world watching it live, especially schools and children who dreamed of becoming an astronaut one day.
And everyone witnesses 7 human beings parish in an instant.

If you really think about it, it's quite tragic and horrifying at the same time. On the world stage 7 people is nothing, but to the scientific world, and to those watching live who were interested, it must have been nothing but that pit of your stomach feeling.
I am saddened by the lose, but I am glad at the same time they didn't let this tragedy halt the program, and they kept going.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

So many things can go wrong,everything needs to be on sync.
Luck on your side.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

When I first learned about that I was stunned that they could be so stupid. Then I saw it happen more and more in other areas and I was stunned it didn't end in disaster more often.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

I was on the flight line at Barksdale when that accident occurred, didnt see the trail first hand but was on hand when the remains were brought to the base, was a pretty somber day.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yup... considering how risky space travel is... its amazing more incidents haven't occurred considering how stupid the politicians in civil service have gotten.

On the military side... yea I am hoping my wife doesn't get promoted so she stops flying, flight line maintenance is starting to scare me.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

It's scared me for years. It went from "go over everything six times between trips" to "eh, we'll fix it later".



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