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I'm still shaking and looking to chat.....

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posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

The epicenter was under Iliamna, one of our volcanoes across the way. We sit right on a subduction zone here and it was a slip strike quake.

I can't imagine being in that quake. There was so much destruction. We are active here but not so violently. Luckily the volcanoes are all across Cook Inlet from us too! We have ocean buffer of about forty or so miles.

I will keep my eyes peeled for any crazy movement areas. I'm interested in geology anyway, this is a perfect rock hounding area for all of these reasons. I've found agate tossed from the volcanoes, jasper, onyx, jade , moonstone and several other awesome hard mineral specimens just on the beaches.




posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:23 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

We didn't have to go check our friends place, a much closer neighbor did. He did mention that another neighbor of his has a crack behind his place backing the Kasilof river. It almost seems as if it runs under the river to where the road cracked. I want to get down there and take a look for myself.

We stuck here today and cleaned up. I'm still floored at how well glass bounced in my house and that not a piece broke for all that was on the floor. We had more fall than many of the pictures I've seen with more damage done. It's almost as if there was a giant invisible pillow for it all to land on. Even the one coffee cup handle has been fixed.

All of the neighbors are doing fine, and I couldn't even get stuff together fast enough to get anything to the folks in Kenai. I'm always happy to see the awesome community response when something happens here.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Literally!
I'm so sorry, this is the second time recently you have responded to me while I'm responding to someone else and I missed it. Looks like I missed a double post at the same time. It's been a pretty nuts 24 hours.

We are safe and sound and picked up! Thank you!



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:28 PM
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Ooooooh, I love moonstones! I have one that really glows beautifully! It must be awesome to find such things on the beach. I haven't been to a beach in some time, but love finding sea glass and making jewelry from the pieces I find.

Glad you are ok and were able to sleep some.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom
It's cool. Things pile up on here while you're posting and I can imagine you've been shaken up. No pun intended this time. I'm glad everything is fine there.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Thanks! I'm headed to bed early tonight too!

The moonstones are a nice surprise, they looked like a milky smoky quartz until I tumbled them and I found their glow. None of them are particularly stunning but I was happy to find them! I made myself a necklace with one of the moonstones. Aside from the one commissioned piece I made, people don't seem to like my jewelry much. I've just been focusing on the stones and doing some geology self study. I may have found a source of watermelon tourmaline as well as amethyst and possibly emerald if I'm doing my homework properly. They aren't very close though and will be a summer road trip.

I love the beach! Ours are usually cold and windy, but they always share a few mineral gifts. I don't find sea glass often because of the orientation of Cook Inlet. We face the volcanoes instead of open ocean. It's neat, we sit on a subduction plate. The earth is recycling itself under our feet. Most of the material I find is at least 6-7 on the MOHs scale because of it. I'm still searching for an elusive Opal. I came across geological studies from the sixties that state there is Opal near me, and we found some possible pieces in a friend's collection when we checked them under a blacklight. People can laugh at me all they want, but I'm happy with the evidence I've found so far.

I finally caved in when I killed my last phone and got a smart phone. I will share my beaches and my stones with you all one day!



posted on Jan, 25 2016 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: woodsmom

None of my stuff even fell over during the 89 quake. There were nearby broken water mains gushing, fires in apartments down chimneys. I had a rickety tv stand with a television on top and a full glass of water on top of that and it didn't fall.


I'm always happy to see the awesome community response when something happens here.

Thats the neat thing about earthquakes, everyone comes outdoors for a while, talking and helping each other. You get to know people that you wouldn't otherwise.

Disaster is the great equalizer.



posted on Jan, 25 2016 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: woodsmom


The epicenter was under Iliamna, one of our volcanoes across the way.

I don't know if you know how deep…

When that much energy is released 'down there', miles of rock can turn to magma from the heat. Eventually, it may find its way to the surface.

But that could take centuries.

A continuing stream of minor quakes over time will tell you if its rising in the caldera, Usually quakes are followed by smaller after shocks that settle down to all quiet again.

Volcanos build, you obviously know more about that than me, you have both there.



posted on Jan, 25 2016 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I believe the final depth was measured at around 76 miles deep. They are calling it an intermediate depth. The release of energy happened within the plate instead of at the contact surface, which seems odd to me. Possibly something to keep a close eye on.

Funny thing about our volcanoes, I think Iliamna is the quietest of the three big ones. Redoubt blew her top and changed her face when she blew and Augustine like to huff and puff every once in awhile. Redoubt puffs on a regular basis too. It's not unusual to see her smoking on a clear day. Hopefully Iliamna follows the mellower neighbor's example, hahaha. Though I think I would rest easier if she started to let off some steam.

It is kind of neat to watch the Earth puff and vent. I can only imagine the geologic forces churning right under our feet. It is honestly comforting that there are significant release valves for the pressure nearby. I would rather the little pressure releases than a huge explosion or a repeat of the '64 earthquake that devastated Alaska.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory has sensors and cams all over the place, or at least used to before funding was cut. Honestly I haven't looked in quite a while.

That's amazing that nothing fell over for you! I can only imagine the shock of seeing the incredible damage everywhere else after escaping it yourself. That was deceiving here. I honestly wasn't expecting to see the damage that ensued elsewhere, and this was nowhere near the Loma Prieta earthquake.

We are fairly sparsely populated too, I can only see two homes from my house, both elderly neighbors. We are pretty deep in the woods. It just dawned on me that this may have been enough to shake the bears out of bed. I'm sure that helps too, not having millions of people on top of each other. We only have so much infrastructure to fail to begin with.



posted on Jan, 25 2016 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom


It is kind of neat to watch the Earth puff and vent. I can only imagine the geologic forces churning right under our feet. It is honestly comforting that there are significant release valves for the pressure nearby. I would rather the little pressure releases than a huge explosion or a repeat of the '64 earthquake that devastated Alaska.

I like that stuff, too. Its just the earth hiccuping. For all the fertile richness of the surface is brought forth from the destruction of volcanoes.

And I agree about the little events relieving stress. As long as the earth is moving thats a good thong. Its when it stops that pressure builds.

Quake away… rollin with the motion. Sounds like you get quite a show from time to time with the cones. California is quiet.

PS: 76 miles is deep. '89 Loma Prieta epicenter was fifty miles deep. Nothing further and no volcano erupting.

Bummer



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