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I'm still shaking and looking to chat.....

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posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: woodsmom


It's going to take awhile to go back to sleep for sure.

Be experiencing the earthquake jitters for a while, too.

Every time you hear a sound you stop and go, whats that? I know, I lived through the Loma Prieta and others. You get that hyper sensitivity for a while to any undo movement. After shocks prick up your ears, theres enough of those.

The reassuring thing is that the big one already happened, smile, you survived it. Another reassuring thing to measure your reaction is to hang a weight of some kind from a string from the ceiling. Its an indicator of the slightest ground movement. If you think another after shock is happening look at the plum bob.

Any movement indicates tremors and if its still, its okay… just the post traumatic jitters.

A free swinging chandelier works, too.

I prefer earthquakes to hurricanes and tornadoes, golfball hail, floods, war, famine…

Theres no (earthquake) warning, but they are over quickly and only the most severe kill large numbers of people.

Sevens, meh.


edit on 24-1-2016 by intrptr because: (earthquake)




posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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I have never in my life experienced an earthquake. I would have been scared to death! Glad you finally got some sleep.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Layaly

Stay safe with those fires too! We actually lived through that for the last two summers too, one as close as a mile away two years ago, and another about five miles away last summer.

Living up here is a constant adventure whether you seek it out or not. All of nature's furies are equaled by her glories though, so it's well worth it. Besides we need something to shake us up in the winter time, this time literally, hahaha!

You guys were great! I appreciate the company greatly. We are used to it enough that everyone else in the family went right back to sleep.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Hahahaha! Five years olds are a special breed!
We went flying down to their rooms last night, I walked into his room just as he stirred. He looked up at me and I asked if he enjoyed the ride, his response was " what ride?", he slept right through it. He like to nap on the boat twenty miles out in the ocean though too. I even have a bungee cord to attach him to his seat so he doesn't fall out when a swell hits us.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Timely

No issues! The topic was to get me back to sleep and you were both great company!



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Thank to ATS, I did.
Not only did I find good company here, it allowed me to connect with others in the state dealing with it too! Since I don't have Facebook, it was very nice.
Thanks!!!(((((((hugs)))))))) to you too!!



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom


Besides we need something to shake us up in the winter time, this time literally, hahaha!

That was priceless .. I love that attitude .. but you hardly slept !!! Only like 5hours or probably less!



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I actually have hanging plants! They works great for that! There have been many times that they swing and we don't feel anything. We live across the inlet from three large volcanoes called the three sisters. Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine. We are in a pretty active zone. Though that was the biggest I've ever felt. I watched Redoubt blow her top several years ago in '08.

This has shown some important changes to make in the house safety wise, especially if things are going to keep picking up activity. This is the second good one we have had since last July.
Thank you for you kind words!!



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom
Talk about being shaken out of bed. Stay safe.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I actually have hanging plants! They work great for that! There have been many times that they swing and we don't feel anything. We live across the inlet from three large volcanoes called the three sisters. Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine. We are in a pretty active zone. Though that was the biggest I've ever felt. I watched Redoubt blow her top several years ago in '08.

This has shown some important changes to make in the house safety wise, especially if things are going to keep picking up activity. This is the second good one we have had since last July.
Thank you for you kind words!!
edit on 24-1-2016 by woodsmom because: Typo, blaming lack of coffee



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Night Star

Thank you Night Star!
It's lovely to see you! I hope all is well with you!

It was a good adventure, though short and jarring since it happened at 1:30 am.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: Layaly

I got about four more hours. Luckily it's a football Sunday, so it's a planned lazy day.


Intrprtr, is right, it's easier than a tornado (which I've also been directly underneath once.....
) or flooding or any other natural disaster really. We have a solid infrastructure built to insulate us at -30f. So we are pretty sturdy. The relative damage is minimal compared to somewhere like Haiti or many other places. Even warmer developed places aren't quite as sturdy.
edit on 24-1-2016 by woodsmom because: To add, is minimal, sorry, no coffee yet



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

Yes and no. Imagine a shaker that big hitting a place with a bunch of brick buildings. They're plenty solid and insulate well, but they're brittle when it comes to something like a shaker.

Or maybe something out where we're at. A shaker in stone post country. Limestone buildings are normal and insulate well winter and summer, but they'd be a disaster in an earthquake.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Fair enough on hat! There is little to no stone or brick construction up here. We are mostly stick built with earthquake movements taken into consideration in most places. Things are made to flex so they don't break. This would have been devastating even on the East Coast with the older construction.

But then again many things that we take for regular occurrences here are massive emergencies there. Cough cough, give us back our snow, cough cough. Haha, just kidding, mostly.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

I've been in a couple of earthquakes. It can be fun and scary at the same time. I hope everything is ok over there.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: animportantperson

I kind of feel like an ass actually.
There has been extensive damage. A building exploded, the highway cracked up and the stores were messed up pretty bad from what I can find so far. I'm having a hard time getting the local news to load up for me to get more info. There are evacuees in Kenai in need of food now. Made me realize the food bank probably took a bad hit too judging from the photos of the stores.

I only hope there is no loss of life.

I really don't understand how we didn't have a single piece of glass even break. We had plenty fall. I found an intact glass vase that bounced off of at least two things for it to have landed where it did.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom


We live across the inlet from three large volcanoes called the three sisters. Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine. We are in a pretty active zone. Though that was the biggest I've ever felt. I watched Redoubt blow her top several years ago in '08.

You got to see a volcano erupt? ewww…. Jealous!

Not so envious of living within sight of one (let alone three).

Here in Silicon Valley, the '89 Loma Prieta quake was centered over an "extinct" volcano, lol. We have another east, called Diablo, they don't call it the Ring of Fire for nuttin, huh?



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom


I really don't understand how we didn't have a single piece of glass even break. We had plenty fall. I found an intact glass vase that bounced off of at least two things for it to have landed where it did.

Damage to property can differ depending on the kind of subsurface strata you live directly over. If stuff didn't break much that means the ground absorbed the energy under you better than it might some other places.

Thats a good thing. Means your house would fare better in stronger quakes, too.

Was there anything thrown out of cabinets? The cabinets facing sideways to the direction of the epicenter don't open as much as the ones facing it.


edit on 24-1-2016 by intrptr because: bb code



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Yeah, it was pretty cool. The ring of fire is no joke, and keeping us on our toes. We did have to put pantyhose on all of our filters so we didn't shred air systems and engines with volcano ash.

We picked our place carefully, at least the general area. We also sit 11 miles in from the coast for tsunami purposes.

Funny thing about the drawers, they all shook open, facing both ways and stayed open. No cabinets came open though, And most of the contents were still upright surprisingly with the state of the drawers.

Luckily there were no fatalities, though four structures were lost to fire in Kenai. We had a road split too apparently. If we go check on our friends place in Kasilof I will take some pics.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom


We did have to put pantyhose on all of our filters so we didn't shred air systems and engines with volcano ash.

Never heard that one before, good idea.


We had a road split too apparently. If we go check on our friends place in Kasilof I will take some pics.

Neat. Look for fences for roads that 'jog' suddenly because of ground displacement and watch for sudden dips or rises.

We went up to the epicenter of the 89 quake and explored. There were trees that snapped in half because they were whipped so violently. Places where the road dropped a foot or more almost tore out the suspension. They were deep drilling over the old caldera into the water table where a crew told us they were detecting sulfur. That, they said meant there was deep volcanic activity and the quake was related to the volcano.

You can eventually find out if your epicenter was under a cone or region near a volcano, too…

(crosses fingers)



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