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Can a 'True Follower of Jesus' be Divorced / Re-married & still call himself a 'Christian' ?

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posted on Feb, 6 2016 @ 08:36 PM
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IF at the end of their life they repent and accept Jesus into their hearts ,then yes they will.




posted on Feb, 7 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: VeritasBlue

You wrote: QUOTE "I wonder if a divorced couple found themselves drawn to the Catholic Church and love the mass but do not receive communion are they still not Christian? What if they live celibate but no one KNOWS that. Are they still sinning? Jesus said that there would be those would be persecuted for his name sake..." UNQUOTE

A divorced individual who is being barred from the Communion table in Catholicism is the object of a process called 'ex-communication' which means the believer cannot partake of the Lord's table, and is thus committed to 'hell' upon death according to Catholic Doctrine, unless he receives penance before he dies and is thus re-communicated to the Faith.

During the Middle Ages, formal acts of public excommunication were accompanied by a ceremony wherein a bell was tolled (as for the dead), the Book of the Gospels was closed, and a candle snuffed out — hence the idiom "to condemn by bell, book, and candle." Such ceremonies are rarely held today, and instead are simply announced by the bishop and put into a book.

Excommunication: n. an institutional act of religious censure used to deprive, suspend, or limit membership in a religious community or to restrict certain rights within it, in particular reception of the sacraments. Some Protestant sects use the term "disfellowship" for the same thing.

Excommunication may involve banishment, shunning, and shaming, depending on the religion, the offense that caused excommunication, or the rules or norms of the religious community. The grave act can be revoked in response to sincere Penance, which may be manifested through public recantation, sometimes through the Sacrament of Confession, piety, and/or through mortification of the flesh.

Under Catholic canon law, Excommunicates remain bound by ecclesiastical obligations such as attending Mass, even though they are barred from receiving Communion (eating the flesh of Jesus) and from taking an active part in the liturgy (reading, bringing the offerings, etc.). "Excommunicates lose rights, such as the right to the sacraments, but they are still bound to the obligations of the law; their rights are restored when they are reconciled through the remission of the penalty."[

According to Bishop Thomas J. Paprocki, "the act of excommunication does not actually expel the person from the Catholic Church, but simply forbids the excommunicated person from engaging in certain activities such as taking communion and forbids any access to the Sacraments."

These activities are listed in Canon 1331 §1, and prohibit the individual from any ministerial participation in celebrating the sacrifice of the Eucharist or any other ceremonies of worship; celebrating or receiving the sacraments; or exercising any ecclesiastical offices, ministries, or functions...






edit on 7-2-2016 by Sigismundus because: stutteringg computerrr keyyboarddd



posted on Feb, 8 2016 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

You wrote QUOTE "IF at the end of their life they repent and accept Jesus into their hearts ,then yes they will..."

So according to your Rule, someone like Adolph Hitler could have at his deathbed asked "Jesus" into his heart and all would have been forgiven him?



posted on Feb, 8 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Sigismundus

Yes.
Of course I'm a terrible Christian and would've put one through his head,my cross to bear...
edit on 8-2-2016 by cavtrooper7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 11 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

You wrote QUOTE : "Of course I'm a terrible Christian and would've put one through his head, my cross to bear..."

Not sure I understand what you mean by the above - can you explain?



posted on Feb, 11 2016 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: Sigismundus

I would have SHOT HITLER...that is a bad thing.
I must do better, in order to uphold my end of the bargain with Jesus.



posted on Feb, 12 2016 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

You wrote Quote "I would have SHOT HITLER...that is a bad thing. I must do better, in order to uphold my end of the bargain with Jesus. " UNQUOTE

So turning the other cheek and loving one's enemies would not apply in this case? Why?



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: Sigismundus

The Catechism of the Catholic Church makes clear:

A Unique Case. One final situation is that of those who have repented of their illicit union, but remain together for a serious reason, such as for the sake of their children. Catholic pastoral practice allows that IF their pastor judges that scandal can be avoided (meaning most people are unaware of their remarriage and consider them a married couple), then they may live together as "brother and sister" (without any sexual relations), and be admitted to the sacraments. If scandal can not be avoided, then they must either  separate or refrain from the sacraments.


www.ewtn.com...
edit on 13-2-2016 by VeritasBlue because: Website link for citation



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: VeritasBlue

Catechism of the Catholic Church

1650 Today there are numerous Catholics in many countries who have recourse to civil divorce and contract new civil unions. In fidelity to the words of Jesus Christ — “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another, commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery”160—the Church maintains that a new union cannot be recognized as valid, if the first marriage was. If the divorced are remarried civilly, they find themselves in a situation that objectively contravenes God’s law. Consequently, they cannot receive Eucharistic communion as long as this situation persists. For the same reason, they cannot exercise certain ecclesial responsibilities. Reconciliation through the sacrament of Penance can be granted only to those who have repented for having violated the sign of the covenant and of fidelity to Christ, and who are committed to living in complete continence. (2384)

Reconciliation through the sacrament of Penance can be granted only to those who have repented for having violated the sign of the covenant and of fidelity to Christ, and ,and who are committed to living in complete continence.. (2384)



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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Can a REAL Christian be a Sinner and still be a REAL Christian?


37 Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. 38 This is the first and great commandment. 39 And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. 40 On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

Matt 22:36-40



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 09:34 AM
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So I guess it's just mind game playing here. No need to post further because
This thread is an insincere mind game. Thanks!

Sigismund II Augustus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wikipedia › wiki › Sigismund_II_Augus...
Sigismund II Augustus I (Polish: Zygmunt II August, Ruthenian: Żygimont III Awgust I, Lithuanian: ... acquisition of Livonia as a Lutheran duchy and the consolidation of Turkey's power in the south. A less ...
Reign‎: ‎1548–1569‎
Dynasty‎: ‎Jagiellon‎



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: VeritasBlue

You wrote QUOTE So I guess it's just mind game playing here. No need to post further because This thread is an insincere mind game. Thanks! Sigismund II Augustus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Wikipedia › wiki › Sigismund_II_Augus... Sigismund II Augustus I (Polish: Zygmunt II August, Ruthenian: Żygimont III Awgust I, Lithuanian: ... acquisition of Livonia as a Lutheran duchy and the consolidation of Turkey's power in the south. A less ... Reign‎: ‎1548–1569‎ Dynasty‎: ‎Jagiellon‎ ..." UNQUOTE

This thread is completely sincere in actual fact. I would like to hear from Christians as to what their stance is on Divorce in the 21st century as it compares with the ultra conservative stance of 'Jesus' on the subject of Divorce/Remarriage.

Actually, Sigismundus derived from the name: Sigismundus Graf von Schrattenbach (28 February 1698 – 16 December 1771) who was the Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg from 1753 to 1771 and an ardent supporter of the young Mozart during his Child Prodigy years.






edit on 13-2-2016 by Sigismundus because: stutterringg commputerr keyboaarrddd



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 05:27 PM
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There were and are so many forced marriages, how does Christianity deal with that? If a woman has no say in a marriage and the contract is made between 2 men and the woman hasn't agreed to it surely in Gods eyes its not valid?



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Sigismundus

My human weaknesses and those of others involved in the structure of society,Individually ,they can hinder better instincts.



posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 08:07 PM
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posted on Feb, 13 2016 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: VeritasBlue
Can a REAL Christian be a Sinner and still be a REAL Christian?




I thought Christ became SIN for the Whole World, thus took all Sin of the entire World upon himself bearing that for You, knowing you couldn't bear it upon yourself. Seeing as JC became Sin he also would have abolished SIN through his Sacrifice, freeing the world of that burden as only. Therefore, he was Forgiven by God, for ALL Sin from the beginning to the end. That's what a gift is, you don't have to DO anything to get it, it's already been done for you.



posted on Feb, 15 2016 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: WilsonWilson

You wrote QUOTE "There were and are so many forced marriages, how does Christianity deal with that? If a woman has no say in a marriage and the contract is made between 2 men (the two future fathers in law) and the woman hasn't agreed to it surely in Gods eyes its not valid?" QUOTE

The idea of romantic love (marriage for love) is rather late in Western Culture, beginning in the late 18th century. Most marriages before that had parents involved from the beginning and $$$$ always in the background it seems...



posted on Feb, 19 2016 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: awareness10

Exactly. I do believe in a lot of cases what Christ said is taken greatly out of context. One good example, is when the rich man asked him how to achieve eternal life. He answered "go and sell all you have and come follow me". The man was bewildered and walked away. Christ then said it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to heaven. IMHO, when Christ told him to go and sell everything, he of course knew he wouldn't. In expressing this he is saying that you can't get to heaven on your own, you cant do it separate from Christ. Remember, he asked, "how can I achieve eternal life?" You CANT, not on your own. But if you accept Christ in doing so you are forgiven for your sin and CAN enter heaven. If everyone could separate themselves from sin and enter heaven of their own volition, there would have been no need for Christ to sacrifice himself. The WHOLE reason for Him being here is because we CANT resist sin to the degree we would need to to achieve eternal life. In knowing this, there really cant be a sin that isn't forgiven through him, except maybe a sin you have no remorse for.
edit on 19-2-2016 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)



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