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Graviton Radiadion

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posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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Firstly, what is graviton radiation? I had posed this ques on Ask me any questions in physics thread, but it got ignored. Few sources on the net give some info on gravity waves and high energy gravitons. No clear picture. Maybe some particle physicists may be able to enlighten on this subject.
I have reason to believe that anti gravity machines give out some weird radiation, which causes nausea and loss of red blood cells and reduction in bone mass making them kind of porous . could this radiation be graviton radiation and how can it be detected and quantified?
Any info on this subject would be welcome. Thanks in advance.




posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

From what I understand, gravitons are purely theoretical. So any insight into graviton radiation would also be theoretical and I'm not we'll enough informed on the subject to attempt to speak about it.

But it is interesting and I'd love to see if any of our resident experts can fill us in.



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 01:07 PM
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It's the same as pixie dust when fairies wave their wands, until such a thing is found to be real.



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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Gravity may be waves purely....What about an electric universe.......and then motion through a plasma or inductance field.....like running a magnet through a coil that's ac or dc.....and high power.....

Cause we're moving fast through any possible Galaxy emissions and then the sun may shoot off dc power at the planets, providing us with fields aiming at us from different angles.....


I like to start with cheerios in a bowl of milk......is that electrostatic or gravity......I need input there



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 02:43 PM
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With the Cheerios its specific gravity.....
Higgs Bosons are the key are they not?

The answers to gravity waves seem a little hazy at present...though I think they did claim to have detected them a while back
In theory, I thought discovery of the Higgs Boson was a crucial next step in understanding gravity.....
Is it a wave ? A particle? Or a Wavesicle?
And how much does gravity weigh?



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Google "nexus graviton Marongwe".
If you appreciate the tip, throw me a bone at gofundme.com/nexusnow.
Thanks and good luck.



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Gravity does not appear to work by radiation.

Mass causes the structure of space-time to deform. This has the effect that the angular momentum of objects in motion becomes curved, deflecting to draw masses together.

The Graviton is the theoretical force carrying Boson that mediates gravity in the standard model


edit on 23/1/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: bandersnatch
With the Cheerios its specific gravity.....
Higgs Bosons are the key are they not?

The answers to gravity waves seem a little hazy at present...though I think they did claim to have detected them a while back
In theory, I thought discovery of the Higgs Boson was a crucial next step in understanding gravity.....
Is it a wave ? A particle? Or a Wavesicle?
And how much does gravity weigh?


cool, that would mean gravity.....unless it's mass attracted by electrostatic....



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 09:46 PM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP
It's the same as pixie dust when fairies wave their wands, until such a thing is found to be real.
Lol nice one. I like fairies



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 09:53 PM
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I don't know what to say about some of the posts in the thread but this is the correct answer...


originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Nochzwei

Gravity does not appear to work by radiation.

Mass causes the structure of space-time to deform. This has the effect that the angular momentum of objects in motion becomes curved, deflecting to draw masses together.

The Graviton is the theoretical force carrying Boson that mediates gravity in the standard model




posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 10:12 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: Nochzwei

From what I understand, gravitons are purely theoretical. So any insight into graviton radiation would also be theoretical and I'm not we'll enough informed on the subject to attempt to speak about it.

But it is interesting and I'd love to see if any of our resident experts can fill us in.
Apart from resident experts, there are others that lurk



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Nochzwei

Gravity does not appear to work by radiation.

Mass causes the structure of space-time to deform. This has the effect that the angular momentum of objects in motion becomes curved, deflecting to draw masses together.

The Graviton is the theoretical force carrying Boson that mediates gravity in the standard model

]Thanks for your input. I'm aware Einstein's loyal terriers abound, though I am 100 % convinced GR is all bunk meaning there is no curved space by any stretch of imagination. But here we are also talking of some peculiar radiation. Any input on that is welcome



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: robwebbjr
a reply to: Nochzwei

Google "nexus graviton Marongwe".
If you appreciate the tip, throw me a bone at gofundme.com/nexusnow.
Thanks and good luck.
thanks for the tip, though this bloke stuart subscribes to GR, which I know is humbug, so I cant give him much credence



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Nochzwei

Gravity does not appear to work by radiation.

Mass causes the structure of space-time to deform. This has the effect that the angular momentum of objects in motion becomes curved, deflecting to draw masses together.

The Graviton is the theoretical force carrying Boson that mediates gravity in the standard model

]Thanks for your input. I'm aware Einstein's loyal terriers abound, though I am 100 % convinced GR is all bunk meaning there is no curved space by any stretch of imagination. But here we are also talking of some peculiar radiation. Any input on that is welcome


I appreciate that you do not accept GR as valid, but since a Graviton is theoretical, some sort of radiation being described as Graviton Radiation would be doubly theoretical, at best.

The fact that radiation from/of a Gravton is not compliant with existing theory would call into question if such a thing could exist as scientific nomenclature.

I believe it is simply an assembly of two 'sciency' sounding words, but I could be wrong.



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Thats pretty much right, the graviton is basically a placeholder as said previously in another post i believe.

It is not part of GR, it is not part of the Standard model. It is a force carrier postulated in theory beyond that of the standard model.

The reason it is there is basically as follows

1) there are carriers of the weak force, discovered
2) there is a force carrier of the electromagnetic interaction, discovered
3) There is a force carrier of the Strong nuclear force, discovered

Sooooooo gravity as a force appears real based on many many many hundreds of years of observations... so it is there as a possible addition to the standard model for the reason of completeness.

Its not postulated by GR, and any claiming it to be, doesn't really understand GR... and no Gravitational waves and Gravitons of the Beyond the standard model are not necessarily the same thing...

Even in theory, the Graviton would be billions of times more difficult to detect than trying to detect Dark Matter... which... is hard... still working on that one. Our detector is almost ready to go online

edit on 27-1-2016 by ErosA433 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:09 PM
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If its not graviton radiation, what kind of radiation could be causing all those undesirable side effects on the human body and can this radiation be detected?
a reply to: ErosA433



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 09:53 PM
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Do small particles have gravity? If not how much matter do you need to start gravity?



posted on Jan, 27 2016 @ 11:26 PM
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originally posted by: Xeven
Do small particles have gravity? If not how much matter do you need to start gravity?
all baryonic particles have gravity however small.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Environmental stress can cause many physical affects on the human body. Our bodies evolved on Earth, with gravity a constant downward pull on our entire physical existence.

Fortunately we don't have any bodily functions that rely completely on gravity, so we don't die in space, and we can last reasonably, upside down... at least for a short period.

SOOO why does it have to be a type of radiation? Yes high energy radiation that penetrates bone does cause it to degrade, this is more a physical destruction than anything else.

Bone density is quite possibly a manifestation of impacts and normal stress under constant downward force.
Example constant trauma to bone causes its structure to become harder and stronger, because the body goes a bit overboard with its repairs... so... lets say gravity causes a constant rate of damage that the body is used to or evolved to deal with, thus bone under normal gravitational conditions. Take away that rate of stress and damage, and the body relaxes its repair strategy?

I am no biologist...BTW, but, this appears reasonable given my experience in medical immaging and talking with people in that field over the years... plus sports men who break things often haha



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 06:21 AM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: Xeven
Do small particles have gravity? If not how much matter do you need to start gravity?
all baryonic particles have gravity however small.

Does gravity exist in the absence of mass? Seems like they are the same thing by the definition of mass.
edit on 28-1-2016 by Xeven because: (no reason given)



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