It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Aliens are Silent because They're Dead

page: 2
28
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:22 PM
link   
a reply to: Prezbo369

Life may be a given if the conditions are right but the longevity of that life is subject to many variables , as we see in our own Solar System we have other planets that were at one time capable of sustaining life but those conditions didn't persist and they are as we see today.

While I agree the real action may be going on in the inner part of the Galaxy I would expect radio would have been picked up from advancing civilizations in relative close proximity, we discovered it why wouldn't others.


edit on 22-1-2016 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:34 PM
link   
If I was an advanced race the most obvious form of communication would be light...

Particularly creating repeatable, unexplainably accurate "blinking" from a light source(pulsar) and then flood the system with communication probes....and wait...

I know we have theories as to how and why pulsars exist but it would still be my go to way to contact the universe were I part of a civilization advanced enough to alter the stars....

-Christosterone



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:38 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Look at us.

It seems highly likely that we will
Be extinct within 500 years.

This is a very hazardous universe to
Live in. One might even be led to
Believe that it is 'tuned for death';

And any species Which becomes
Technologically successful would
Try to overcome suffering and
Mortality with it....like we are
Trying...and the deck is stacked
Against that....the odds of accidental
Self-termination is very significant.

Those few species that find the
'singularity' would in effect no
Longer be biological entities..
And so from our perspective
Might well fall off the radar
Too....

Maybe they evolve into near
Immortal nannite clouds which
Orbit stars... In short, I think it's
Likely that between the high
Frequency of species going
Extinct 'naturally' and the
'effective' extinction of those
Few Handfuls which successfully
Navigate the 'singularity'....

Death is a very likely 'great filter'.

Kev



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: Prezbo369

Life may be a given if the conditions are right but the longevity of that life is subject to many variables , as we see in our own Solar System we have other planets that were at one time capable of sustaining life but those conditions didn't persist and they are as we see today.

While I agree the real action may be going on in the inner part of the Galaxy I would expect radio would have been picked up from advancing civilizations in relative close proximity, we discovered it why wouldn't others.


Yes,I suppose you could use Mars as a model, but then again Mars's fate is a matter of open discussion as yet, never mind that it will probably take a manned mission to Mars to find any fossils for instance...with the exception of the destruction of Richard Hoover's crinoid of course1



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:40 PM
link   
Loose lips sink (space)ships.

Silentium est Aureum.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:40 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Radio quickly falls off into background
Noise.

Kev



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:44 PM
link   

originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: Prezbo369
Life may be a given if the conditions are right but the longevity of that life is subject to many variables , as we see in our own Solar System we have other planets that were at one time capable of sustaining life but those conditions didn't persist and they are as we see today.


And yet there is intelligent life in our solar system.


While I agree the real action may be going on in the inner part of the Galaxy I would expect radio would have been picked up from advancing civilizations in relative close proximity, we discovered it why wouldn't others.



That might be the case, but to then say that the rest of the galaxy or even the entire universe is devoid of intelligent life seems like a stretch considering the numbers involved.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: gortex

Enrico Fermi helped bring to fruition the most destructive weapon on the planet. He is become death, destroyer of worlds.

I hardly accredit his philosophy of life.


There were thousands of physicists whose work led to the atomic bomb. Einstein himself lent his name to the effort to get Roosevelt to authorize the development of the bomb. (It was a committee of scientists who wrote the letter over Einstein's signature.) So do we dismiss Einstein's Theory of Relativity because he was involved in making the bomb? That seems nonsensical to me. BTW, your unattributed quote about "destroyer of worlds" is from J. Robert Oppenheimer, considered the "father of the atomic bomb," quoting an ancient Hindu text, not Fermi, who himself was strongly and publicly opposed to developing a hydrogen bomb.


As far as extraterrestrial life, how you think life got here? We are extraterrestrials.


Technically, that is true in the sense that the elements that make up our bodies were forged in star furnaces. So in a kind of loose metaphorical way you can make that claim, but in terms of our species, or any species on earth, having evolved elsewhere and been planted here, there is no evidence that is the case and quite a lot of evidence in the archaeological record that we evolved here on Earth. It is remotely possible we have been "tweaked" by a race that may have stopped over in the neighborhood to do a little tinkering of the local fauna, but you can't really prove that either. There is no smoking gun.

The sole issue here is that when you throw time into the equation, the likelihood that a space-faring species could have found us (no small feat) and interacted with us as a species, is slim simply because the two us us, the Aliens(tm) and us would not have overlapped at the same time.

edit on 1/22/2016 by schuyler because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:50 PM
link   

originally posted by: Morrad
Every dot in this Hubble deep field photo is a galaxy. It was taken from a dark point in space with a light exposure of 10 days.



How can they make this assumption, let alone a theory?


They aren't saying other life intelligent doesn't exist; they are only saying that it might be very sparse.

Sure, given billions of galaxies and many many trillions of stars, intelligent life almost certainly does exist. However, the idea here is that in a given finite amount of space, perhaps intelligent life might be very rare.


edit on 1/22/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:50 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

some races may be dead xd

but imo there should be many more left




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:53 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

Edward Teller beat Fermi hands down. He was nuts for the thermonuclear.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:54 PM
link   
How narrow minded of them to think that aliens would even remotely use the same type of communications devices to be able to detect their signals.. Are they saying that aliens are real ?



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:56 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex

Nice one Gortex


I've only skimmed it after going straight to references.* At first it looks like a rephrasing of already vintage arguments and then it begins to take a slightly different shape. It's one more facet on the hypothesis that we are alone out here. It's disheartening on one hand and actually exciting on the other because it suggests we could be the only sentient creatures for many, many light years.


In the far future, we may be able to find evidence for biogenic isotopic anomalies on the initially wet rocky planets around most stars. Since life does not persist for long in the Gaian bottleneck model, it predicts a universe filled with isotopic or microscopic fossils from the kind of life that can evolve in * 1 billion years, not the fossils of larger multicellular eukaryotes or anything else that would take several billion years to evolve.
PDF link (P17)

Some points are already familiar. It's not only intuitive, it's inevitable that most examples of life will be very basic and is also predicted by evolution.

All this dicking about fighting with the neighbours looks ridiculous against the background of star fields and, potentially, uninhabited galaxies.

* I collect papers on this subject



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Kandinsky

This is one of my favorite subjects of all-time too.

Humans may arrogantly believe that the "preferred and easily obtainable
state of things is to cruise around in FTL starships".. but we may be the
only species to ever make such a fuss over that particular mythology.

*shakes hand at sky - Dang you Star Trek*

I find it super more likely that the rare (if any) advanced biological
entity out there is far more likely to attempt some form of
self-ascension via technology into a non-biological form... thus
becoming quasi-immortal..

than to dodge black holes, pulsars, quasars, radiation from other
sources, disease, aging and death.....

than to strap unlicensed nuclear accelerators to their backs
and brave the void of space

when they could be comfortably "ascended immortals" with lives
of infinite contemplation, safety and pleasure in their own little
'virtual realities'.

Those few who choose space ships, the Universe lovingly kills
with all the hazards discussed before and more we don't even
know about..

Humans always assume that other forms of life, if any, are
obsessed with our own mythologies and preferences.

Kev



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:14 PM
link   
Read the article yesterday.

What complete and utter arrogant crap it is.

We've been looking for what...50 years?

People making these kind of suggestions - do they not grasp the size of the universe? They should do, and yet they make suggestions like this.

There could be a single advanced civilisation in each galaxy and the universe would still be teeming with life.

This is simply another case of a scientist trying to make a name for themselves.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:23 PM
link   
a reply to: neformore

In the Isaac Asimov novels, the Universe has basically been
wiped clean of life by intelligent robots.. as a result of
the 3 laws of robotics... these robots even manipulated
all the time streams, to eradicate all complex life,
to follow their mandate of protecting humans.

Now I'm suggesting nothing of the kind.. but I'm 1/4
Native American Indian.. and I say those Indians should
have blasted the face off of every white settler to peek
their nose into their continent..

but they didn't, so they were pretty much exterminated
and their continent stolen.

I have to agree with both Nick Bostrom and Stephen Hawking..

I take great comfort in the apparent emptiness and hostility
of the Universe. It's perhaps the only chance humans will
ever have to 'make it'.

Not that I particularly want humans to make it.. I'd rather a proper species
like cats or dolphins had their chance.. but that's another
subject entirely. (it's not that I don't like humans.. but humans are
admittedly blood-thirsty, genocidal maniacs, at least at present).

Kev



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:29 PM
link   
a reply to: intrptr




Enrico Fermi helped bring to fruition the most destructive weapon on the planet. He is become death, destroyer of worlds.


Pardon my french...i think it's cr**. The wonderful thing is...nobody cares what I think and vice versa



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Variable


All the evidence so far, after years of SETI and others points to the fact that we are very alone.


Who knows? Perhaps intelligent alien life doesn't broadcast their whereabouts, like we do.

Picture a cat on a deserted sidewalk, looking up at a Jumbotron that's displaying inconceivably huge amounts of information...The Cat ponders the whereabouts of it's next meal. But wait, there's more.

Now picture yourself looking at the Sun (w/ eye protecion of course) while you imagine the taste of your soon to arrive, greasy pork sandwich....... All you see is the Sun but it's really a galactic billboard that we Humans can't read, yet. We could be in the same boat as the Cat, no? Think about it. Life could be everywhere, out "there."
edit on 10 27 2013 by donktheclown because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Variable

I didn't miss the point. They are saying that it is relatively easy for life to evolve on hospitable planets although it is extremely difficult for it to get any kind of a foothold. Extremely difficult does not mean impossible. The right conditions occurred here. I think if this occurs only once in every 1000 galaxies then there is the potential for many multi-cellular lifeforms, maybe some evolved lifeforms in my opinion.

Evidence from SETI appears to produce a false dilemma in my opinion. Light can take millions or billions of years to reach earth. If life somewhere else in the universe was on par with us evolutionary wise, any communications could take up to billions of years to be received. A communication from the closest galaxy Andromeda would take at least 220,000 years. If life evolved there somewhere, on par with us then any communication would not be received for thousands of years. The fact that nothing has been received from the direction of Andromeda suggests to me that any potential evolved life was unable to send communication 220, 000 years ago. It does not dismiss the possibilty of life. I hope this makes sense. I am not an expert. If you have anything that explains this I would be very interested.

PS. I don't believe in aliens visiting us, just open to the possibility of other life.




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 03:01 PM
link   
I am a believer in life as we know it, and life as we do not know it. We still have no clue as to what type of intelligent life from both types is out there. We have only just begun to stick our toe in the interstellar waters of the galaxy pools. Some scientists think there are about 3,000 civilizations in our own Milky Way. At about 300,000 light years across that number could be low. Life is everywhere in universe, and we are getting closer and closer to finding it according to SETI.



new topics

top topics



 
28
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join