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'Mini tsunami' along Washington coast caught on camera

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posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: antar

the guys voice says this happened the day before the buoy dropped......he said people on the beach couldn't run fast enough to get away from it




posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: research100
a reply to: antar

the guys voice says this happened the day before the buoy dropped......he said people on the beach couldn't run fast enough to get away from it


Makes you wonder if one has to do with the other??



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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Well, not to be an alarmist, but perhaps those on the Pacific Northwest coast should take a short vacation inland for a spell?

Iowa maybe? Dress warm.



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: Drunkenparrot
Possibly a tidal bore coming in to Wilapa Bay?


That's probably the most likely reason. It looks practically identical to this one:




Could also have possibly been a seiche, conditions depending. Best video I know of to demonstrate what a seiche is isn't as quick as the OP's water speed, but does demonstrate the similarities.

Wiki's seiche page




My money's on tidal bore, though.



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 08:39 PM
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Article about this issue just posted 3 hours ago:

www.cbsnews.com...



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 08:51 PM
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originally posted by: OneGoal
Article about this issue just posted 3 hours ago:

www.cbsnews.com...


Sigh, now that article made me feel worse... lol



posted on Jan, 21 2016 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

Better to be safe than sorry. I really hope this doesnt happen soon, but like they say, its long overdue and will probably be a 9.0+ imho.

My thought is that when it hits, a subsequent eruption of one to several cascadia volcanoes will occur.

Its not going to be great for any of us.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 12:15 AM
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VERY INTERESTING! Great catch, thanks for posting, OP.

What's seen in the video is neither a tidal bore or a seiche, and here's why. Seiches happen on lakes, not oceans; that is definitely the Washington coastline on the Pacific Ocean. And while the phenomenon in the video is somewhat similar in appearance to the tidal bore in the other video, tidal bore occurs as a small wave travels upstream and inland from an oceanic tide. It's plain to see that the large, fast-moving wave in the original video is coming in from the open ocean, impacting along the entire coastline.

That's a tsunami folks.
edit on 1222016 by M4nWithNoN4me because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:04 AM
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A precursor to the over due quake/tsunami like in 1700?
I hope it doesn't reach Puget Sound.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:08 AM
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Well, it appears we have a possible answer:


National Weather Service investigates

The National Weather Service Office in Seattle, working with the National Tsunami Warning Center (in Palmer, AK), and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reviewed the videos, along with meteorological, and oceanic conditions and determined that the wave was what's known as a "sneaker wave."

Sneaker waves result from a build­-up of wind­-generated wave energy, normally from distant storms, NWS said. Sneaker waves run significantly further and higher up the shoreline than other waves arriving at the shore before or afterward.

NWS said the time of the event, large wave swells from a distant Pacific storm were reaching the Washington coast. As these waves interact with other waves from other sources, they combine to form larger sets of waves, which release their energy on the coastline in ways that were documented in the video.

The Weather Service said sneaker waves occur relatively frequently on the West Coast, but they are not normally as large, strong, or as dramatic as the one that occurred on Saturday. Because of the higher run-­up, they typically surprise beachgoers who are not watching the waves closely and constantly.


www.king5.com...

Sneaky.

ETA: Might also have something to do with the buoy issue...

When I first saw the video, I thought it MIGHT be a mini tsunami, but then changed my mind, because tsunamis are usually a train of waves, back to back, not just the one...
edit on Fri Jan 22nd 2016 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

Thanks for showing up, TA.. When it comes to topics like these, you're definitely one of the voices i want to hear, especially if somethings happening in the Cascadia subduction zone..

Question- are you satisfied with their response?
edit on 22-1-2016 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:20 AM
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a reply to: jhn7537

Yes, I am. For the following reasons:

1) There was no quake.

2) The video shows only one wave.

3) The speed of the wave too low for a real tsunami.

I think they're right.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:50 AM
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a reply to: jhn7537

This looks similar (if somewhat more powerful) to an event in south west England in 2011:
Although most explanations centred on an underwater landslide, one researcher claimed that a "seiche" was the reason. This article explains his thinking and lists some phenomena that were noticed at the time, which you may want to compare to the Washington event.

Hugely interesting thread.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147in best liam voice RELEASE THE KRAKEN!.! but i doubt it was storm surge it was moving very fast




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:28 PM
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I'm not too sure how it works, but the Oregon Coast was getting slammed with storms Wednesday and Thursday. I know yesterday that the storm dropped 2.6 inches of rain in 12 hours. Possible that the same storm system is responsible?



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537
Reading the linked article reveals this;

The National Weather Service Office in Seattle, working with the National Tsunami Warning Center (in Palmer, AK), and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reviewed the videos, along with meteorological, and oceanic conditions and determined that the wave was what's known as a "sneaker wave."
Sneaker waves result from a build­-up of wind­-generated wave energy, normally from distant storms, NWS said.
Source
No Earth quake just high winds.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

Here is a link to the data buoys. Maybe you can check out the ones near you and be familiar with normal wave heights? National Data Buoy Center



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

Great catch thanks for the follow through.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: TXTriker
Here is a link to Katrina storm surge in Biloxi. Sorry don't know how to imbed.

www.youtube.com...


I live in Florida and have since 85. Storm surge just doesn't show up that fast EVER and not without strong wind. That video of Katrina is extreme. If it was storm surge it would not have went away so fast.

That can only be caused by an EQ/land displacement somewhere offshore.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

I have lived on the Ocean for 31 years. I guess I missed all those sneakers lol. A wave is a wave. Rouge waves, been there done that, absolutely hate them. That much water shown in the Washington video had to be pushed, no two ways about it. Something large had to push that water, what was it? Probably an underground shelf falling but not a real quake. That would explain why only one wave.

We would have heard about hundreds of people being sucked out to sea off beaches all the time if this USGS concocted story were true.

Think about it, the explanation is BS!!



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