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Current & Future Water Issues - The Elephant in the Room

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posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 11:04 AM
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Just read an article from the Huffington Post.

I thought you good folks would find it very interesting and might want to discuss.

The article subject is in regards to the current and possible future water issues we as a global race will need to face up to. The article seems to have enough meat to it to give it serious consideration. Details are population growth, climate change, industry usage, drought and so forth.

There is an elephant in the room that is not being adequately focused on.

Hope the link works!?
m.huffpost.com...

edit on 1 20 2016 by bucsarg because: (no reason given)

edit on 1 20 2016 by bucsarg because: Spelling and added link.




posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 11:12 AM
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Does it detail the innovations in desalination technology over the last decade?

If not, it's more sensational nonsense from huffpost!



posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
Does it detail the innovations in desalination technology over the last decade?

If not, it's more sensational nonsense from huffpost!


I just read the article and didn't see any references to desalination.

I would imagine that's a regional solution though and that the plants probably take several years to build.
I'm not sure where, but I also recall reading somewhere in the past that heavy metals and other contaminants remain after desalination.



posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: peter_kandra

originally posted by: pl3bscheese
Does it detail the innovations in desalination technology over the last decade?

If not, it's more sensational nonsense from huffpost!


I just read the article and didn't see any references to desalination.

I would imagine that's a regional solution though and that the plants probably take several years to build.
I'm not sure where, but I also recall reading somewhere in the past that heavy metals and other contaminants remain after desalination.


Yes, the brine (by product) is fed back into the ocean.

Horrible for sea life/environment....but that's never stopped us..




posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: Tucket

When they get around to studying the real impact of fracking on the various aquifers ; thirsty will take on a whole new meaning.



posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: peter_kandra

Your subject of desalination is important. So I did a little research. Hope I can remember what I read.

There are, currently, desalination plants today operating in arid regions. The plants are using older technology and expensive to operate. High energy costs due to high electrical usage for high pressure needs for example.

There have been ongoing research in various subjects related to desalination of sea water. From reducing operating costs, improving filtration, etc..

MIT and Cairo University have looked into improving filtration. MIT is looking into nanotechnology at the atomic level to filter the water at low water pressure with goal of reducing operating costs and improved filtration.

I believe at some point in the future a study will need to be accomplished to determine scaling up costs at very large scale operations around the world to be able to supply population requirements.




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