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Tassie local claims the Thylacine(Tasmanian Tiger) still exists and the Gov knows about it

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posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 02:02 AM
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Hey guys I thought I would make my first 2016 post after a year away, Being from Tasmania myself I thought this may interest some people here as news from down in the southern hemisphere on the claimed to be extinct Thylacine(Tasmanian Tiger) is very slow.

Have a listen to this interview with a Tasmanian Local on local radio he has some interesting stories about the Thylacine not being extinct and his encounters with them.

Interview is 15 mins in duration.



THYLACINE enthusiast, who is only known as Andrew from the North East, claims the animal still exists and he's not the only one. Andrew claims parks and wildlife are aware of the Thylacine's existence and have told him there are 100 breeding pairs “unofficially” in Tasmania.


Radio Interview(Audio SoundClick Source)




posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 02:10 AM
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a reply to: amraks

Sounds like a great insight !

However with no evidence ( photographic ) - we are still left; just hoping.

With cancer affecting the Tassie devils as well ... you guys are only left with - Huon Pine.

Hope the evidence has been covered up to stop trophy hunters ...




posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: amraks

Is there any evidence other than hearsay?Spoor,droppings or chomped-on carcasses?Are there hunters there who have seen anything?

If the population is low and the animal is shy,I don't see why they can't still be knocking around.Here in N.Germany there's a small range of mountains(Harz Mountains,350 million years old)that has lynx in it but as far as I know,they are never seen.

It may sound preposterous but I believe that a few Megalania still exist in the Australian outback.

No drop-bears,though.😃
edit on 18-1-2016 by Ericthedoubter because: Missing "l"



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 02:29 AM
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a reply to: Ericthedoubter

The Drop-Bears are located on the mainland.
predominantly on the East coast through to Sth.Australia.

Not even close to endangered ...




posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 02:59 AM
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yeah, sounds a little too hopeful/fishy... this guy hasn't recently written a book on the subject or something has he? $$$

A hundred breeding pairs (a few hundred individuals at least) is an awful lot for an animal that hasn't been officially documented in nearly a hundred years and is secluded to a relatively small Island.
edit on 18-1-2016 by rexsblues because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:06 AM
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a reply to: amraks

I've heard this type of story before from different areas, one around where I used to live.

The reasoning behind them knowing and not telling anyone is to ensure people don't go out looking for them.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:08 AM
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originally posted by: rexsblues
A hundred breeding pairs (a few hundred individuals at least) is an awful lot for an animal that hasn't been officially documented in nearly a hundred years and is secluded to a relatively small Island.


To put it into perspective, there are an estimated 10-50,000 Tasmanian Devils and they're on the endangered list.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:12 AM
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a reply to: Timely

This state has much more than Huon Pine as a tourist draw card except the government won't fund some of the idea's, but that’s a completely different topic all together.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:17 AM
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a reply to: Ericthedoubter

I have had a few relatives that claim they have seen them, I have seen stuff run out on the road of a night.
I need to get out in the bush a bit more I think..
Planning going on a camping trip soon.

Megalania might have to check that one out.

Drop bears is a myth to scare the non locals



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: rexsblues
yeah, sounds a little too hopeful/fishy... this guy hasn't recently written a book on the subject or something has he? $$$

A hundred breeding pairs (a few hundred individuals at least) is an awful lot for an animal that hasn't been officially documented in nearly a hundred years and is secluded to a relatively small Island.


Guy is Anonymous and has had his name chosen by the radio station. He don't want the attention by the sounds of it,

His just chiming in on giving his accounts of researching and encounters.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

Have you heard how the forestry would fire bomb the areas?



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:23 AM
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Im a die hard sceptic on things like this, but not when it comes to the tasmania tiger. I met a very respectable ederly gent in the 80's who claimed to me that he killed one while hunting with his rifle in mid 70's i think. He lived in Tasmania at the time. This chap wasnt the type to make up fairy tale stories, i believe him. He said after he recognised what he had killed, he panicked & rid the carcase in fear of being fined & prosecuted. There was a hefty fine or jail sentance for anyone being caught killing one, not sure now days.
edit on 18-1-2016 by MegaSpace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: amraks

They would back burn areas, is that what you mean?



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: Timely

It could be true, there's definite need for more investigation of course. There was a photo published years ago of a tazzy tiger in Victoria. Bloody typical Vic's mate claiming others fame, but won't go there LOL.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:32 AM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: amraks

They would back burn areas, is that what you mean?


Burn area's where they had reported sightings of the Thylacine so they wouldn't have to cease work in that area.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:36 AM
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originally posted by: rexsblues


A hundred breeding pairs (a few hundred individuals at least) is an awful lot for an animal that hasn't been officially documented in nearly a hundred years and is secluded to a relatively small Island.


Tasmania is a pretty big island, I haven't even seen every town every side of Tasmania yet.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: amraks

No I haven't heard anything like that, it was always about protecting them, not destroying them.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: amraks

There was a bloke from the SW of WA who swore black and blue that he saw such an animal around his farm several times over the years. He maintained this until he died. There is a video of him floating about the net somewhere. He had very good photos and other evidence that does not resemble any known animal in the area.

My brothers farmed a couple of ks away and they reached a point where they would not go down the paddocks without their guns in the end because of spooky events that occurred.

To think we walked for miles through that forest looking for roos when we were young kids.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 04:08 AM
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fascinating! I've never been to Tasmania but I would love to (even live/work a farm there
)

I have spent a lot of time in the forests in South Western Australia, and have come across some pretty mutilated carcasses. Heard some weird sounds too
Would not surprise me one bit if there were numerous undiscovered/still living species across Aus. It is a vast and vastly unpopulated place. Some of the places I've been, you can be less then 50m from camp and not see a thing!

edit: I sleep in my 4WD for a reason. Now way I'm sleeping on the floor with a smell bit of canvas between me and god knows what. I know people up north who have security screens on their windows. Though for some slightly different reasons

edit on 18-1-2016 by orgncpndmc because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: amraks

No I haven't heard anything like that, it was always about protecting them, not destroying them.



It wouldn't surprise me one bit if they was doing this to protect the logging industry from shutting down.



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