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Iran sanctions: Middle East stock crash wipes £27bn off markets as Tehran enters oil war

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posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Informer1958
a reply to: greencmp

I am talking about financial experts who does monthly reports for investors on Wall Street.

Were they aware there was going to be a problem with oil prices falling this fast? I am not an expert in this, so I just assume you were.


I understand, I added some clarity above.

The lesson is for government to not interfere with markets.


Governments are puppets for big business...and big businesses use governments as puppets to change the world economies...




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: Informer1958

Damn, did anyone see this coming as a result of the Iranian nuclear deal? Again, good job Obama!

You know Saudi Arabia is pissed!


Umm no , not a good job

Its always amazing people who make comments like this, obviously have no clue of how the world economy works, much less our economy, bare in mind im no expert myself but I do know the basics....

This is NOT a good thing, You might be happy that gas prices are going to drop or that Saud is getting "stuck" , but this does NOT bode well for the US either. Nor Russia, who is heavily dependent on oil prices, get ready to see some reactions from them as well.

This wouldnt be so bad for the US if we were allowed to be oil independent and actually use our own resources , but thanks to the left we cannot.

Get ready to see some serious implications here in the US if this all goes down.

Hyperdeflation, then extreme hyperinflation........
edit on 1/17/2016 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69
Oil, sooner or later will lose it's worth almost completely.

Lockheed says makes breakthrough on Fusion Energy project

WASHINGTON (Reuters): Lockheed Martin Corp said on Wednesday it had made a technological breakthrough in developing a power source based on nuclear fusion, and the first reactors, small enough to fit on the back of a truck, could be ready for use in a decade.


I wouldn't say that hydrocarbons will ever be worthless. They are a finite commodity and critical for a variety of manufactured goods.

For example, when we develop efficient nanotube manufacturing technics, such a pure source will be invaluable.

I do agree that we shouldn't be burning it.




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: Skywatcher2011

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Informer1958
a reply to: greencmp

I am talking about financial experts who does monthly reports for investors on Wall Street.

Were they aware there was going to be a problem with oil prices falling this fast? I am not an expert in this, so I just assume you were.


I understand, I added some clarity above.

The lesson is for government to not interfere with markets.


Governments are puppets for big business...and big businesses use governments as puppets to change the world economies...


I don't think anyone could argue that these government policies have helped business.

The sad part is that policy makers typically believe that they are doing good despite the fact that they are virtually incapable of doing good.
edit on 17-1-2016 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: greencmp



I understand, I added some clarity above.

The lesson is for government to not interfere with markets.


Thank you, and I do agree with your comment. If I am correct, it was in 2008 when the government passed legislation to have control in the Stock Market due to the crash? I believe it was called something like Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, My understanding was to keep the 2008 Markets from ever collapsing and doing bailouts for subprime mortgage crisis and other failures.


edit on 17-1-2016 by Informer1958 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:02 PM
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As Canada cringes even more.

Tarred and Feathered




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Yep, it's killing us.
And every time the oil goes lower our dollar seems to go lower, costing us more for just about everything



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: Informer1958

Yup, their answer was to interfere even more in the market and commit to legislation that requires that they continue to interfere in deeper and vastly more dangerous ways.

We are now far more susceptible to toxicity than we ever were before.

It's as if we gave our teenager a Ferrari so that they won't get in another car accident.
edit on 17-1-2016 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Not at all, Obama was singled out again, he didn't lift the sanctions.
The 5 + 1 lifted the sanctions.



edit on thSun, 17 Jan 2016 17:10:34 -0600America/Chicago120163480 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80

Maybe it'll impact our economy in a way that you don't understand.

God who cares what Obama did.



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80

Not at all, Obama was singled out again, he didn't lift the sanctions.
The 5 + 1 lifted the sanctions.



Oh BUT you *know* Obama was the main player by far.

I bet most of the sanctioned money was in the U.S.




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: onequestion



God who cares what Obama did.

Good point, funny how you didn't care when he was first brought up.


So when we boost production with fracking it's no big deal, but when another country does it, it is going to destroy the economy..
Just another example of how our over reliance on oil is going to screw us again.
www.investopedia.com...

On the face of it, although the US seems to be a huge beneficiary of lower oil prices, deeper analysis shows the situation to be a bit more complex. Though the US is the second largest importer of oil, it is also the second largest producer of oil and there has been a significant increase in US oil production over the past 5 years, mainly due to the use of newer technologies such as fracking. While lower oil prices will benefit consumers in terms of increased savings that are likely to increase consumption and result in an uptick in the GDP, they are also likely to hurt U.S. shale oil producers in the long term -- who according to estimates need oil prices to be above US $60 to break-even -- and lead to lower associated investment. Lower oil prices will also negatively affect the profitability of US energy companies such as Exxon, Chevron etc. (To read more about the shale resources in North America,

Read more: A Complex Story: Global Impact of Low Oil Prices | Investopedia www.investopedia.com...
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook




edit on thSun, 17 Jan 2016 17:22:33 -0600America/Chicago120163380 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80

Do you know anything about what it cost each country to produce oil and why?



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Please enlighten me.

It seems yes US will take a bit of a hit, looks like it will be the frackers that take it though. The public can take the savings and spend it else where.
Oh see how you ask me a question and I actually respond? That is how it should work.

edit on thSun, 17 Jan 2016 17:25:51 -0600America/Chicago120165180 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)

edit on thSun, 17 Jan 2016 17:26:55 -0600America/Chicago120165580 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80

A bit of hit?

IT TAKES 80$ A BARREL!

Hah!



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

So the answer is to not allow Iran to produce then?



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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Can someone break this down " Barney style" how lower price of oil will cause a global economic catastrophe? Seriously, I'm not up to speed in this type of field.



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:34 PM
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I have no idea what the answer is.

Don't put words in my mouth.



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: onequestion

Please enlighten me.

It seems yes US will take a bit of a hit, looks like it will be the frackers that take it though. The public can take the savings and spend it else where.
Oh see how you ask me a question and I actually respond? That is how it should work.


I agree that people benefit from diminished energy prices. But, where were you guys during the last 7 years?

The Obama administration deliberately caused the increases in the first place. Anti-free market advocates agreed vociferously then that forcing prices upward was beneficial to Americans so they must be tearing their hair out now that energy prices for Americans are returning to their naturally low values.

Which is it?



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I didn't, just asked a question. You want lecture me on how it is a problem.
Asking if you have an answer.




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