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President Obama declares emergency in Flint

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posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: links234

Flint is dead. The people there are surviving off its corpse. Poison water has to be the last straw. It's time to relocate these citizens and raze the whole city.
If we can bring people from all over the world and resettle them we can do it with our own citizens. The US seems to have its own refugee problem.
The Federal Government allowed this to happen by not taxing the hell out of cars made in Mexico. For those who think that would bring higher prices to consumers need a little lesson in supply and demand. It was only ever about profit.




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 10:47 AM
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Your right Flint is dead and by the time the lawyers get done with it there won't be enough left for a zombie to live on

a reply to: VinMan




posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: St Udio

there were some vain attempts to beautify the desolate, empty auto fabrication buildings and to re-purpose buildings into metro-sexual apartments for young professionals & college aged people...


I Googled "re-purpose buildings in Flint MI" and it doesn't look so good.



A third of the city has been left abandoned. If all of the abandoned houses, vacant lots, and buildings were consolidated, there would be 10 square miles of "blight" in the city.

Young said, "You can buy houses by the dozen on eBay. You can get houses for $500."

Flint is a small city of about 100,000 people. In 2012, Flint's statistics, per 100,000 people, were: 62 murders, 106 forcible rapes, and 662 robberies. The murder rate alone is higher than Baghdad's.

The numbers have earned it the No. 1 spot on Business Insider's "most dangerous cities" lists for 2010, 2011, and 2012. Violent crimes in total — including murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault — reached 2,729.5. The poverty rate is over 40%, and the percentage of adults with a high school degree is roughly 83%.


When there is no money the local Government has none too, and I do not see a lot of companies wanting to invest in Flint. One of the big issues is that many places like Detroit and Chicago will not let people buy a building without investing large amounts to get the building up to code first and clean up any environmental hazards known or not known. A big part of all this is 100s of inspectors and agencies all wanting to be paid. In the end it is easier and cheaper just to build a new building in a business friendly State.

edit on 17-1-2016 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:04 PM
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I have a friend (more like acquaintance) that has one of these $500 houses on the north side... Not too bad if you don't go outside. Also his power meter reader box gets stolen and subsequently replaced by consumers about every other month.
a reply to: Xtrozero



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: VinMan

Welcome to NAFTA..a bad deal and plenty of blame to go around including the unions.



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: JacKatMtn
Politics to the extreme...

The folks in Flint paying for their water supply have been poisoned by moves on the political level...

How about the Federal gov't come in with an emergency plan to both, provide clean water to the citizens, and prosecutors to jail those for allowing this to happen....

Jail a few, save the innocent....

holding my breath..


There not going to jail these disgusting politicians who wanted to save money on the backside of children.

Obama is a wimp and organization politician who will do NOTHING to see that justice is done to these swine.

Obama hasn’t indicted one banksters so he won't prosecute another group of criminal politicians

Modern politics is a self protection racket



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: SteamyJeans
I have a friend (more like acquaintance) that has one of these $500 houses on the north side... Not too bad if you don't go outside. Also his power meter reader box gets stolen and subsequently replaced by consumers about every other month.
a reply to: Xtrozero



So I need to ask, what does a person do with a power meter...lol



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:24 PM
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A couple of years ago a friend of mine took some metal to a scrap yard. He said there was a pile of stainless steel sinks bigger than his house there. Thousands of them stolen and scrapped. He wanted one for a deer processing shop in his barn. $100 for one like new that goes for $2500 new.







posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:38 PM
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Even if people weren't drinking the water, why does this river has so much crap in it? Industries using it for a sewer?



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: mikell
A couple of years ago a friend of mine took some metal to a scrap yard. He said there was a pile of stainless steel sinks bigger than his house there. Thousands of them stolen and scrapped. He wanted one for a deer processing shop in his barn. $100 for one like new that goes for $2500 new.



Makes one think of how many of these house have been gutted of wire and pipe, also even down the streets too. I remember a while back about reading of some fellas ripping up 4 miles of buried copper wire...lol



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: korath
Even if people weren't drinking the water, why does this river has so much crap in it? Industries using it for a sewer?


I live near the Colombia river and Portland/Vancouver and all the little towns do not use it for drinking water, and it is considered clean.

Flint River is 19 times more corrosive to pipes than the water they were buying before. They could have added agents to counter that but they didn't and so all the lead and iron in the pipes went into the water and poisoned the residence. I'm sure other stuff is in there too as it is a 78 mile river that runs right through the city, industries etc.



posted on Jan, 17 2016 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: JacKatMtn

It's not only Flint....or even only Michigan....

When your water leaves a treatment plant, it is transported into large pipes, or mains, that run under your city's streets. These are typically made of cast iron or concrete. The problem occurs when the water flows into smaller pipes known as service lines, which carry the water directly to your home.

An estimated 3.3 to 6.4 million service lines in the United States are made out of lead, and while they are found across the country, they're especially common in older neighborhoods in the Midwest and Northeast. This, of course, makes it very likely that your home's tap water is being contaminated by this poison virtually 24/7.

Toxic Taps: Lead is Still the Problem

We probably don't really want to know....the replacement costs would be astronomical.



posted on Jan, 18 2016 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: links234

heck yea there still getting billed and at outrageous amounts..i grew up in flint and much of my family still live there..i just yesterday saw a flint water bill of 145 a month for poison water..its bs all the way around and it really pisses me off that we as a country can devote billions of dollars to Iran after a prisoner exchange but flint mi only gets 5 million in aid...what the hell is going on in this country that our govt cares more for another countries people than its own..



posted on Jan, 19 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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originally posted by: SteamyJeans
Also i heard volunteers remarking that they noticed a. people coming back through the lines to get a second dose of free water and b. that most of these cars in line were nicer cars than many of us volunteers were driving...
Now how relevant that is i dont know, but it is true...




Just a thought on this part... Bottled water is fairly cheap. When it's the only option for cooking or drinking (without incurring brain and organ damage), you need a lot of it. I'm guessing stocks from stores in a wide area are being thoroughly depleted. Anyone with a halfway decent job living in the area can drive a nice car, because housing costs next to nothing.

People aren't going to wait in line more than once for a case of water to take advantage of the free $4 of H2O. They're going to do it because they really need some clean water that isn't going to destroy their children's brains forever.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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m.wiscnews.com...

An Ohio village may have some lead contamination, too.

Makes me wonder about the process of testing water, how often its done. Wonder if there are other places at risk. Where I live we were advised of lead pipes and to not use hot water from the tap.

How Flint got to where it is, I don't know. Again I feel for them and hope it doesn't happen anywhere else.

I think there was a resignation though.

Also this: www.theguardian.com...


edit on 22-1-2016 by PhantomOrion because: More to add

edit on 22-1-2016 by PhantomOrion because: More to add



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: SurrenderingIsBack

This goes back even further, IMHO.

Back to the City of Detroit Bankruptcy, and how they pushed it through with little concern for people.

They took away the healthcare of the retirees...and slashed their meager pensions.
They did nothing to revamp pensions for future retirees, ensuring financial pension woes will again be a problem for the city.

Then, because Flint owed Detroit MILLIONS in unpaid water bills, and despite efforts by Detroit and Kevin Orr to makea deal with Flint, they decided to go it on their own.
Without proper planning, the scramble was on to disconnect.

This is a horrible situation.....with plenty of blame to go around.
Yet, we hear NOTHING about the beginnings of this mess.....


edit on Sun Jan 24 2016 by DontTreadOnMe because: edited to be more precise as to what happened.



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: JacKatMtn
a reply to: Skid Mark

I hope the folks in Flint get a better deal considering that this wasn't a spill, but a local authority allowing substandard water to be supplying the folks in the community...

I read where some are saying that some of their supply pipes are still LEAD PIPE...

I don't know WTH these elected in Michigan think they can get away with, but it's becoming obvious that they have and do so with zero regard for the folks who elected them...

That needs to change quickly... with a hammer if need be...

OMG this is the 21st century, in the Greatest nation on earth.. and folks are being poisoned because their elected care more about their wallet and connections...

I may be wrong, but our laws should in no way protect those who would do such a thing...

(insert multitude of non T&C compliant words here)


Who's going to drop the hammer?



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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One wonders what Flint was thinking.
But like I said, people are/were not the first concern when cities are in financial crisis.

On April 25, 2014, Flint, [....] switched to using the Flint River as its water supply. The city had drawn water from Detroit’s system for decades, but it was expensive, and so Flint joined efforts to create a new, regional system that would draw from Lake Huron.

Costs had become a central concern in a city that has lost thousands of auto industry jobs. Fiscal troubles were so significant that the state sent an emergency manager — with ultimate decision-making power — to oversee a recovery. Until the new pipeline to Lake Huron was constructed, the city would take its water from the Flint River, which it had used as a backup.

[....] For years the Flint River had been a dumping ground — for cars and even bodies. Aware of the doubts, the city’s first news release on the switch trumpeted state and local officials’ assurances.

[....]
Then came the odd colors from the tap — greens and browns — and the offensive smells and tastes. Soon there were reports of rashes and clumps of hair falling out.

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Jan, 24 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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Read thing the other day that it would cost $15000 to replace the water lines to each house. I'll do it for $5000 and not leave the comfort of my living room. Just had one replaced in November $2200.





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