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Looking to retire in Canada

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posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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I'll be completely retired in 3-4 years. My hubby and I live in the United States (Wisconsin), and are looking to move to Canada when I retire. I'm used to cold weather and I like it, so winter is not a deal breaker.

I'm looking at four different cities - Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, and Regina. I'm a city girl, don't want to live out in the middle of nowhere. I realize it will be more expensive to live in the city, but we'll have the money to do so. I'll be getting a pension from both the military and my civvie job, and my hubby gets a military pension and Social Security, so we'll be set moneywise.

For those of you living in Canada, what would you recommend? We're looking to maybe check out Toronto for a summer vacation to scope it out. I'm also trying to find out if my hubby could still get his Social Security or have to forfeit it if we move out of the country. Also trying to figure out the health insurance. We are both 20 years retired Navy, so we could utilize Tricare, but I'm not sure if we could do that out of the country.

If we cannot, either of those would be a deal breaker. We have been thinking of this for some time now.




posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

Why Canada ?



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

I would aim for north of Toronto...

Muskoka is an incredibly beautiful town...

Many people come to Niagara as well... its more or less a retirement community, everyone says its beautiful

I think I've just lived here too long




posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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a reply to: M5xaz

It's close to the United States, and I like their liberal government. I have some relatives who live there. I wouldn't have to learn a foreign language.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: Akragon

Thanks, I'll google Muskoka. Oh, I almost forgot, maybe Ottowa. I don't think I spelled that correctly. They are pretty far north though. I like the winters, but I think that would be a bit much. I had forgotten that Niagara is close too.

Now more things to research.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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Vancouver is the most beautiful and mild. I would first take some readings with a good geiger counter on a visit there during a rainy day, in the eaves troughs. If its acceptable. I have always wanted to do that and am now living in the southern interior of bc. But miss the coast.

Depends what you like, Calgary is a bit like Kansas.

Toronto is cold.

I like BC. If you like civilization, and a smaller city with a decent climate, less rainfall, lakes, orchards, rarely gets below 6 C in the winter. I'd go with Kelowna, BC.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:31 PM
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Follow the link to a good place to start researching how to use Tricare in Canada. I've used the Tricare Overseas Program as a retiree. The biggest drawback is that you have to pay the bill first, and then submit a receipt for reimbursement.

www.tricare.mil...



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: Unity_99

Thanks, I'll check that out. I marvel at the fact that Vancouver is so far north, yet has such mild weather. That's pretty neat. I'd like to live near the coast.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

What about Victoria BC? I'm not sure where you live in WI, but Vancouver is a huge and growing city, and housing is ridiculous. There's a lot of value and a really nice feel in Victoria. It's in my top 5 favourite places in Canada.

Are you looking to buy or rent? You might have some hoops to jump through in that respect depending on what you want to do regarding citizenship.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

It depends on what you're into.

If you want big city life and don't mind more extreme temperatures (both cold winters and hot humid summers) then Toronto sounds like it could work. I would say the best thing about the city is its diversity and its neighbourhoods. There are a lot of very interesting neighbourhoods in Toronto that are really fun to live in and explore.

I grew up there but now reside on the west coast. Personally I prefer the milder weather and more mountains, ocean, nature, etc that come with this territory. So if that's your thing go Vancouver.

Calgary I didn't really like tbh. There's some cool stuff around there (Rockies, badlands) but overall it just felt like a bland place to live imo. Regina I have no idea, but you definitely don't hear about too many people aspiring to retire there


One other thing to keep in mind though - Toronto and Vancouver are both EXTREMELY expensive. I know you said you've covered that, but make sure you know what you're getting into with these two cities in particular. Average price of a home in either one is over $1 million.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Thanks, yes I'll check Victoria out. We're looking to rent. It's just my hubby and me. We don't want a big place.

And we would make plans to achieve Canadian citizenship.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

Just follow the only road buddy... You'll find a good spot




posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: Akragon

Bwahahahaha! Oh, I love South Park.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: Akragon
a reply to: ChiefD

Just follow the only road buddy... You'll find a good spot


Lol except you can't, because our only road recently broke (due to cold weather!), and cut one half of the country off from the other:

Bridge partially reopens after break that cut Canada in two

Oh Canada!



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: ChiefD

I have a friend who works in immigration, and just out of curiosity I texted him about how many people retire in Canada. His answer....not many. In most cases, as a retiree, you would need to begin by spending some time here each year, for a few years at least, and then speak to immigration about coming here permanently.

I guess there is an issue with free medical care and people trying to take advantage, but you have medical care, so immigration should take that into account.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: mc_squared

Oh my gosh! That had to be scary for the lady that saw a couple of vehicles flip and smash back down. I would have been terrified. Highs were in the negative teens. Okay, I don't like that kind of cold. Yikes!



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Thanks for the information on that.



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: mc_squared

originally posted by: Akragon
a reply to: ChiefD

Just follow the only road buddy... You'll find a good spot


Lol except you can't, because our only road recently broke (due to cold weather!), and cut one half of the country off from the other:

Bridge partially reopens after break that cut Canada in two

Oh Canada!


No probs... They have 3-4 years before ChiefD heads our way

We'll have it fixed up in a jiffy guy...




posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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I wish you luck, my mom married a Canadian and moved to Edmonton, sure cold up there. When he retired they moved to Vancouver Island, nice weather there.

I hope you have looked into the legal requirements to reside in Canada.
Here is a link to Canada Visa Forum that has a question and answer about a US citizen retiring to Canada.

Basically you have to become a Permanent Resident, have $800,000 you can invest or only visit for 6 months.

Also if you stay a US Citizen, you will still be liable for US taxes. (it sucks I know)



posted on Jan, 15 2016 @ 08:44 PM
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I agree with others Toronto and Vancouver are extremely expensive, If I were you I'd head down the road from Toronto about an hour away and check out Kitchener/Waterloo. Big enough city for your comfort, less expensive to live and you're still close enough to Toronto to enjoy it, not far from Kitchener (15 min) is St.Jacobs that has one of the largest farmers markets in the country. and half hour away is Stratford that has the largest Shakesperian festival in north america.




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