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I suggest NK Nuclear threat is a total fake. No nuclear weapons, no H-Bomb.

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posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 01:40 AM
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Back story: I recently posted a thread about: Nukemap 3D and in this thread we discuss this Firefox extension that lets you hypothesize about various possible nuclear attacks. It is a data modeling plugin. I did some initial testing of the application using the initial atomic test device yield as the basis. The target was Seoul SK. I left every parameters at the defaults and the causality potential was pretty high. It was something like 240,000. The thing that caught my attention was the 10 kiloton yield estimate of that initial device. I was taken back to a time in the Early 80's when I had intel access for a time. I remembered a briefing document that discussed a very real threat of a low tech fission bomb. Without including any details the device of concern in that document it had the exact same yield as the initial NK device. The prototype device in question is most easily done underground. It is a gravity not explosive driven device. The 2 parts of the fission core are impacted in a long section of pipe. A gravity drop with weight and vacuum and insulation materials is sufficient to cause a super-critical event in the fission core halves. It can be done underground fairly cheaply at a budget cost the NK regime could afford on their rather tight budget.

This would mean all they would need to budget is the fission mass material and some low tech construction work and drilling to make a nuke event for the record. The second event the H-Bomb detonation was characterized by a higher EMP yield I believe. This could be faked by using the Russian designed explosive driven EMP device. Here is an example paper

Imaging if they used a low tech fission device like I suggest here and add a explosive driven EMP device with it? They should be able to simulate yields that can match close to H-Bomb levels. This is my theory of how the dirt poor NK Gov managed to fake nuclear club membership on a budget.


edit on 01am2016-01-14T01:43:32-06:0001431America/Chicago43131 by machineintelligence because: errata




posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 01:51 AM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

I thought we had determined with some certainty that it was a fission device boosted with tritium.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: machineintelligence
Just like they have every time. They take all the conventional explosives and bury them underground. Then they set the pile off and cry "nuke"





posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 03:52 AM
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Well, this is the country who claimed to be the first to send an astronaut to the sun. But he went at night so it wouldn't be as hot so it was ok...



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 04:22 AM
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originally posted by: Vroomfondel
Well, this is the country who claimed to be the first to send an astronaut to the sun. But he went at night so it wouldn't be as hot so it was ok...


I so wish they claimed that. I really do it would have been the story of the decade in my eyes, but alas.
mic.com...



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 04:58 AM
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originally posted by: Punisher75

originally posted by: Vroomfondel
Well, this is the country who claimed to be the first to send an astronaut to the sun. But he went at night so it wouldn't be as hot so it was ok...


I so wish they claimed that. I really do it would have been the story of the decade in my eyes, but alas.
mic.com...


After his golf scores and the unicorn hair, it seemed kind of pale in comparison. I don't think anything is beyond the scope of possibility with this guy.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 05:45 AM
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Reports on the bomb test state that it was less than 10 kilotons, hardly a Hydrogen bomb, perhaps the trigger for a H bomb?



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: pikestaff

It was a fizzle. They have issues getting the full yield.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 08:18 AM
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Wow are North Korea learning quick


British H-bomb tests in 1957 'were a bluff www.independent.co.uk... .html



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 09:17 AM
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north korea and its leader is just a CIA asset acting as a boogie man for asia.

if the US reaaly would like to make a change they could do it in less then an hour.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: machineintelligence
I remembered a briefing document that discussed a very real threat of a low tech fission bomb. Without including any details the device of concern in that document it had the exact same yield as the initial NK device. The prototype device in question is most easily done underground. It is a gravity not explosive driven device. The 2 parts of the fission core are impacted in a long section of pipe. A gravity drop with weight and vacuum and insulation materials is sufficient to cause a super-critical event in the fission core halves. It can be done underground fairly cheaply at a budget cost the NK regime could afford on their rather tight budget.


If you've got a lot of uranium, and you can't figure out very basic explosive technology, and you don't mind a really really high probability of a fizzle, you could probably do this. But no one would.



This would mean all they would need to budget is the fission mass material and some low tech construction work and drilling to make a nuke event for the record.


Any country with physicists and a machine shop could do better with a shape changer topology. It's easy. The yield sucks and it's generally "hot" even before you shoot it, so we don't do that anymore. There's also a fratricide issue with them. But we did a couple of these in the early 60s.

Gun type weapons are easy too.

But you can't do a gun weapon with plutonium. You sure can't do it with the output of Yongbyon. Your assembly time is way too short.



The second event the H-Bomb detonation was characterized by a higher EMP yield I believe.


No. The weapon doesn't "yield EMP" at all. Gammas are what does the trick. You can't get EMP from an underground detonation in a shaft. Maybe if you had God's own cavern, but even then, you won't get much. The thing that makes EMP for you are gamma rays and the Compton effect. And Earth's magnetic field. You have to have a lot of room for the electrons to loop, or no EMP, and if you do it in an airburst, and do it just right, you have very little EMP because you get two mostly self-cancelling sets of wavefronts. A ground burst doesn't produce as much because the free path of the electrons is shorter due to air. A near space detonation is the best for EMP. But definitely not down a shaft.




Imaging if they used a low tech fission device like I suggest here and add a explosive driven EMP device with it? They should be able to simulate yields that can match close to H-Bomb levels. This is my theory of how the dirt poor NK Gov managed to fake nuclear club membership on a budget.



The crappy low yield they got (plus the shapes of the seismic waves) tells you it wasn't a thermonuke. They didn't fool anyone.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 12:38 PM
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originally posted by: yeahsurexxx
north korea and its leader is just a CIA asset acting as a boogie man for asia.

if the US reaaly would like to make a change they could do it in less then an hour.


Oh sure, blame the US for everything bad that is happening. You do know that NK is more likely to be a KGB/Russian asset, but hey everyone loves Russia these days right?! Even though they are actively funding a Nazi like dictatorship which still makes use of concentration camps to torture and kill dissidents.

People these days...

edit on 14-1-2016 by Clairaudience because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

Except north korean nuke tests have been confirmed as real.

The H bomb claim though is currently discredited.
edit on 14-1-2016 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

The technology of the device just might be pretty large, crude, and not able to be loaded onto a warhead of a bomb or rocket I am saying.



posted on Jan, 16 2016 @ 02:38 AM
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Since SOOOOooo many "Know-It-All's" use Vice News as their Holy Grail of Info:


Yes, North Korea Probably Tested an H-Bomb — Just Not the Kind You’re Thinking Of

WTF Moments from article?



A-bombs and H-bombs, also known as thermonuclear bombs — is highly nuanced. 

Ok. . . ?



To be sure, the practical difference between big and small H-bombs isn't that one is exactly nicer to get hit with, but the big H-bombs certainly are a lot worse.


Jesus H. Christ - just come clean already!!



here's the bottom line: North Korea probably tested an H-bomb, just not the kind of H-bomb you're thinking of.




More to the point:

E-M-P



posted on Jan, 16 2016 @ 02:40 AM
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nm.
edit on 1/16/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2016 @ 02:58 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Source?


And Japan detecting radiation. . . Really??



Who is Japan working w/ in regards to Radiation?? Let me guess - - " in Solidarity" with united states



posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 03:43 AM
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North Korea was successful in detonating a hydrogen bomb. The seismic yields are smaller than one would expect if you were simply detonating bombs by putting them in shafts that you have drilled. That is not what has happened with all of the North Korean tests. These explosions were decoupled. That means a lot of the energy was not transmitted into the rock because the bombs were detonated inside caves or cavern systems. North Korea has the largest tunnel network in the world. They are experts at digging and probably have a lot of already existing underground bunkers in which to test these devices. If you explode a bomb in a large void, a portion of that energy is going to be taken up by the vaporization of the atmosphere. It's basically an atmospheric test underground. All of the nuclear tests were probably larger by a factor of 100. All you have to do is look at the first test to get a hint. It is very hard to make a nuclear bomb with a very low yield less than a kiloton. North Korea can't do this.



posted on Jan, 20 2016 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: Adaluncatif

They didn't. It was 4-5kT if I recall. This last one was about 8-9kT. The area is hard rock.



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