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Rumors Are Flying That We Finally Found Gravitational Waves

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posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:10 PM
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Rumors Are Flying That We Finally Found Gravitational Waves

Might have to give ol Einstein another award or something.

Seems that the Ligo Group at Cal Tech has gone out and posted a rumor online that they may have discovered gravity waves. And it was thanks to their new upgraded equipment.

Like good scientists they are a bit shy about coming out and actually saying they found gravity waves until they can verify their results.

This one is definitely one to watch. Hopefully this one won't be a dud like the few times before.

However I have one main question. What practical applications can be made out of this discovery?


Excited rumors began circulating on Twitter this morning that a major experiment designed to hunt for gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of spacetime first predicted by Albert Einstein—has observed them directly for the very first time. If confirmed, this would be one of the most significant physics discoveries of the last century.

Move a large mass very suddenly—or have two massive objects suddenly collide, or a supernova explode—and you would create ripples in space-time, much like tossing a stone in a still pond. The more massive the object, the more it will churn the surrounding spacetime, and the stronger the gravitational waves it should produce. Einstein predicted their existence in his general theory of relativity back in 1915, but he thought it would never be possible to test that prediction.


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edit on 11-1-2016 by grey580 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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gravity waves unlike radio waves theoretically can go though solid objects. you could in theory send a message through the planet instead of having o go around it with satelites.


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posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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a reply to: grey580



What practical applications can be made out of this discover?

Other than, once again, showing that Einstein was right?
Gnarly barrels dude!



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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I believe they are trying to detect gravitational waves from the big bang.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: grey580

waits for published articles and peer reviw analysis



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:17 PM
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Or it could be a wonky reading from a bad sensor they haven't traced down yet.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: Phage

He's still schooling us even from beyond.




posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: grey580



What practical applications can be made out of this discover?

Other than, once again, showing that Einstein was right?
Gnarly barrels dude!


Illuminati confirmed.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:20 PM
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Here's a rendering of what the device looks like.

gizmodo.com...


edit on 11-1-2016 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: grey580

That is a very small part of the device, just one of the improved detectors.
Here is the whole thing. Well most of it.


Gravitational waves have a very large wavelength. You need something big to find them.

edit on 1/11/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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Gravitational wave surfing dude!



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: cenpuppie

heh.

Now you got me thinking about Bob Lazar.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: grey580

Trouble is you'd have to paddle at the speed of light to catch one.
Tow in, maybe.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Super gnarly indeed!

Gravity based propulsion and artifical gravity for long term space faring are my hopes.

This is awesome. Phage your comment on the wavelength of gravity fascinated me because i actually did some concept drawing of planets and stars with the gravitational waves pictured and whenever i thought about wavelength, i thought it must be measured in km. Exactly how big these are, youd know better than i do.

Also, does something like wave dilation/doppler effect with gravitational waves occur as you move further from the center of mass?

Another question, does the gravitational wavelength increase or decrease with greater mass/density?
edit on 11-1-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-1-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-1-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: OneGoal
The math is well beyond me but if there is any relationship to more conventional waves the wavelength would be dependent upon the amount of energy involved. But that's where I would have to dig a bit deeper. With electromagnetic radiation, higher energy is associated with shorter wavelengths. But with mechanical waves (like in the ocean), it's the opposite.

I would think that the expansion of space would affect the wavelength in a manner similar to the way it affects light though. Perhaps, the farther away the source, the longer the wavelength.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: grey580



What practical applications can be made out of this discover?

Other than, once again, showing that Einstein was right?
Gnarly barrels dude!

Einstein can't hold a candle for Tesla ! as for Gravitational Waves they are faster than light which kills relativity theory.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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Second hand gravity waves, and other stuff..perhaps.

www.ann-geophys.net...


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posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: mazzroth



Einstein can't hold a candle for Tesla !
Well, since Einstein was a physicist and Tesla was an engineer, it's not really a valid comparison.


as for Gravitational Waves they are faster than light which kills relativity theory.
Interesting claim, since it was the equations of relativity which predicted the existence of gravitational waves.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: smurfy



Second hand gravity waves, and other stuff..perhaps.

A common misconception. Gravity waves are atmospheric waves. Unrelated to gravitational waves.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: mazzroth

I would tend to postulate that is not true. If the gravitational waves are found to travel faster than light, it would likely be because space itself can travel faster than light....but the mass within that moving reference cannot move in the space faster than light.

edit on 1/11/2016 by Krakatoa because: (no reason given)




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