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Researchers' metallic glue may stick it to soldering and welding

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posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:24 AM
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Researchers' metallic glue may stick it to soldering and welding




"MesoGlue was founded by Huang and two of his PhD students: They had
a dream of a better way of sticking things together."


This metallic glue called MesoGlue can bond at room temperature, it can adhere unlike materials together and has many uses.



astonishingly, a glue made out of metal that sets at room temperature and requires very little pressure to seal. "It's like welding or soldering but without the heat," says Huang, who is professor and chair in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.


Here is a short video about MesoGlue

MesoGlue Introduction

I can think of many uses that may not be listed, and just had a thought about this and other technology.

Just think, with this glue and a 3D printer, you can pretty much be a self contained repair and fabrication facility.
This could change more than just soldering and welding.




posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:34 AM
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Awesome. Metal velcro!

I could have done with some of this back when I was fiddling with 360's



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 05:32 AM
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a reply to: imd12c4funn

The implications of using this stuff are huge.

Imagine being able to fix a gas pipe with gas still in it? Or anywhere where heat and flame from welding has previously been prohibative?

Bet it's expensive though which would mean it would only be available tot he public in tiny tubes.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 05:54 AM
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BIG difference between bonding and fusing metals together.

Glue bonds , heat fuses.


edit on 11-1-2016 by intrptr because: correction



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 06:31 AM
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This would be great stuff for repairing cracked engine cases .I am thinking of chainsaws and motorcycle blocks .I have has some success with Lab Metal in the past but this new glue would or should allow for different kinds of repairs like gluing broken pieces back on ,or attaching a fastener of different metals to others . I wonder when this stuff will be in the stores ? I just thought of my brothers old broken rifle bolt . I wonder if the stuff could be used to build up worn surfaces and if the stuff is machinable ? .....S&F op thanks



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 07:03 AM
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This may be fine for circuit boards and the like, but I don't think you could use it to build a bridge or a water tower.
Keep your sticks hot fellas, we ain't obsolete yet!



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
This may be fine for circuit boards and the like, but I don't think you could use it to build a bridge or a water tower.
Keep your sticks hot fellas, we ain't obsolete yet!


Yea I was just thinking that...

In the welding world we already have something similar to 'glue' it's simply called brazing. Which I'd imagine would still give a better result then a blue.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 09:53 AM
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These metals are also just dandy for causing horrible corrosion to other metals. And they weaken grain structures, causing metal to shatter. So I'd really really want to know that they are totally and forever locked within the glue joint with no chance of any of it getting out and depositing on nearby metals.

In fact, there's a whole branch of deviltry that rotates around indium-gallium-mercury alloys, that can be tailored for various metals for just that thing - it's called liquid metal embrittlement. And there are also other forms that you can apply to some metals, titanium and aluminum alloys stand out, that will keep them from assuming stable surface states, and they will literally start foaming and fall apart right in front of you, at a nice room temperature. Just the thing if you need to...ahem...render infrastructure unusable.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
This would be great stuff for repairing cracked engine cases .I am thinking of chainsaws and motorcycle blocks .I have has some success with Lab Metal in the past but this new glue would or should allow for different kinds of repairs like gluing broken pieces back on ,or attaching a fastener of different metals to others . I wonder when this stuff will be in the stores ? I just thought of my brothers old broken rifle bolt . I wonder if the stuff could be used to build up worn surfaces and if the stuff is machinable ? .....S&F op thanks


I would like to test it mending high pressure tubing, aluminium, cast iron, maybe even breached hull of a ship.

I think the list of uses is ∞



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: strongfp

originally posted by: DAVID64
This may be fine for circuit boards and the like, but I don't think you could use it to build a bridge or a water tower.
Keep your sticks hot fellas, we ain't obsolete yet!


Yea I was just thinking that...

In the welding world we already have something similar to 'glue' it's simply called brazing. Which I'd imagine would still give a better result then a blue.


I'm already posting my LN-25 for sale.
Optimist. Wire, Rod, silver solder, all going in the dumpster. Might keep plasma cutter though.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

BIG difference between bonding and fusing metals together.

Glue bonds , heat fuses.



So in CERN terms, we are all bonded together.
Not fused?



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: DAVID64
I'm a welder fabricator myself and thought exactly what you said as soon as I saw the article. Lol we have enough cheap Chinese junk trying to infiltrate our niche we dont need more do it your self welding stuff for idiots. Now dont get me wrong I always like them people cause when they eff it up really bad I can use the work... Its just when I go to a job and am asked to use products like that, that's when I roll the leads and drag up. I was once asked to weld aluminum to black iron at a va hospital, I told them its not possible and that is an engineering mistake. After arguing for about 30 minutes the site super approached me with JB weld. I drug up.


edit on 11-1-2016 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: imd12c4funn

originally posted by: strongfp

originally posted by: DAVID64
This may be fine for circuit boards and the like, but I don't think you could use it to build a bridge or a water tower.
Keep your sticks hot fellas, we ain't obsolete yet!


Yea I was just thinking that...

In the welding world we already have something similar to 'glue' it's simply called brazing. Which I'd imagine would still give a better result then a blue.


I'm already posting my LN-25 for sale.
Optimist. Wire, Rod, silver solder, all going in the dumpster. Might keep plasma cutter though.


Who ever wrote this article most likely has no knowledge of welding priciples.


'Hot' processes like soldering and welding can result in metallic connections that are similar to those produced with the metallic glue, but they cost much more. In addition, the high temperature necessary for these processes has deleterious effects on neighboring components, such as junctions in semiconductor devices. Such effects can speed up failure and not only increase cost but also prove dangerous to users.

Read more at: phys.org...


Brazing works off a principle known as capillary attraction, the filler metal flows into spaces that are heated, and it's not very expensive. You can use a blow dryer to make this work.

The guy who wrote this article and who ever made that quote attacking welding obviously doesn't know how welding or braze welding works.

This glue from what I see would be good for small components, and would replace soldering, not welding, and even at that soldering is would still be king as it has time to normalize the metal atomic structure.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: imd12c4funn

Careful not to get some on your hands.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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Metal glue?

Isn't that what J B Weld is?

*ponder*



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: imd12c4funn

Let me know if you want to get rid of that LN25. Ironworker here.





posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: Surveyor7
I love the ln25 I use one quite a bit off of the sa250 diesel drive. You can sometimes find good deals on them on eBay. Got some old ln20's laying around too, the cc squirt guns, they work good too except they r always live.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman

We usually have an 8 pack set up at work depending on the size of the project. They're nice. I don't know what it is but I love that noise they make.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: Brotherman
a reply to: Surveyor7
I love the ln25 I use one quite a bit off of the sa250 diesel drive. You can sometimes find good deals on them on eBay. Got some old ln20's laying around too, the cc squirt guns, they work good too except they r always live.



Just as an addendum to sticking things together, I had a job where I wanted to stick a small bearing into an aluminium housing, I got the Loctite out, the really strong stuff, stuck it in and thought in the morning it would be good and solid. Imagine my surprise when the bearing just fell out in the morning. Thinking I had a duff batch I phoned up the makers and abused them. They said that aluminium and the stainless of the bearing were not reactive metals and the stuff needed darkness and reactive metal ions to send it off.
So I got a bit of wet and dry rubbed it on a piece of copper for a few mins. (Copper is one of the most reactive metals) then rubbed the wet and dry on the parts I wanted to stick, thinking that this would impart reactive ions to the surface of the non reactive metals. Then did the job again, the stuff went off so fast I just had time to line it all up. So that's a good tip to remember.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: anonentity
I'm a professional contract rig welder. If someone hands me jb weld or lock tite I look at them like they are retards and tell them to get someone else.



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