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Strange New State of Hydrogen Created

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posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 07:59 AM
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originally posted by: acrux
I wonder if this is plausible with other gases, eg. Solid metal oxygen/helium etc.

Any physicists out there know if it is even theoretical?


Thats an intersting one...Specially helium...
And He3 in particular.
Helium......Trillium?!?!? Makes u wonder...




posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

Think Asimov suggested in one of his sci fi novels that at the heart of Jupiter lies a diamond the size of our Earth.

That really would be interesting all through the logistics of mining such a thing would probably require a civilization of type 2 or 3 on the Kardashev scale.



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

An object travels through the cold depth of space, where pressure is at an absolute minimum, into an atmospheric condition so highly pressurised that the DIFFERENCE in pressure is enough to make the object respond as if it had hit a solid surface, without there being any solid matter in the vicinity.

It's like a plane going from the air to the sea. No solid matter present other than the aircraft, but it WILL shatter on impact unless the angle of approach, speed, and angle of impact are JUST so.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

It was Arthur C. Clark in 2010 Odyssey Two, if I remember correctly.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: SolidGoal

My bad so it was, sometimes i get the those two authors confused, long time since i read there books.



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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By the early and simplest definitions employed in the periodic table, hydrogen is classed as a metal and the deciding factor is the polarity of its ions. This development confirms that hydrogen does indeed have a solid metallic phase under the right temperature/pressure conditions.

Interesting contribution to scientific knowledge



posted on Jan, 11 2016 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake
No worries, they are both great authors of SF.
In the third novel of the space odyssey series, 2061, the remaining shards of jupiter's diamond core is a central point of the story.



posted on Jan, 13 2016 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: SolidGoal

Have you read "3001 The Final Odyssey"?



posted on Jan, 13 2016 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake
Unfortunately yes.
It was my least favorite of the series.
Arthur C. Clark once said that the books are not necessarily linear sequels, they need to be read as different variations of the same theme. Well 3001 was IMO the worst of those variations.

Did you read it ? If so did you liked it ?

OP, I hope we are not derailing your thread with this Space Odyssey discussion.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 04:49 AM
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a reply to: SolidGoal

Kind of agree with your assessment. Loved the rest the last one was mediocre at best.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

I have to admit, I kind of liked the idea of their computer "virus" who tries to convince its host machine to compute an impossible task forever (the virus they used on the monolith). That kind of appealed to my technical side.

But the rest, as you said, is mediocre at best.

Cheers.



posted on Jan, 14 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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in 2010 Jupitor blows up to make a star.
big bits get bone off and found to ne dimound.

metal Hydrogen would be lighter than aluminum.
but it would Not float on water. high mass!
I think it would make a good exsploion with metal oxygen!



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 12:07 AM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
I can't quite get my head around solid Hydrogen. So that's what's inside a gas giant

Planet with mostly gas Nickel core like Earth. Looks like this diagram shows metal Hydrogen for Jupiter.

solarsystem.nasa.gov...


edit on 27-1-2017 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: rickymouse
They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.


Good point, Ricky Mouse. This new form of Hydrogen is predicted to exist on large Gas planets where the right conditions are present. So, man isn't creating it out of thin air, but just creating this on Earth where it doesn't exist, yet.


Now, they have recently added four new elements to the periodic table and those elements may not actually exist in the universe. Those they may have actually created, but they may exist under the right conditions somewhere but don't last long, breaking down almost instantly. I didn't look that up myself, my daughter told me about it so I am not sure if it really was done.


But what I am seeing is the half life of the latest ones is better with a few isotopes showing some stability relative to the other elements nearby on the Periodic Table.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: acrux
An interesting question for you all.

Skip the physics of how to create it.

01. Would a solid hydrogen balloon filled with hydrogen gas float?

02. Which would be heavier a solid hydrogen balloon or a lead balloon?


A1:
not likely, but maybe someone will devise a test to see?
A2:
That would have to be Plumbum Pb, lead.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: Justoneman

originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: rickymouse
They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.


Good point, Ricky Mouse. This new form of Hydrogen is predicted to exist on large Gas planets where the right conditions are present. So, man isn't creating it out of thin air, but just creating this on Earth where it doesn't exist, yet.


Now, they have recently added four new elements to the periodic table and those elements may not actually exist in the universe. Those they may have actually created, but they may exist under the right conditions somewhere but don't last long, breaking down almost instantly. I didn't look that up myself, my daughter told me about it so I am not sure if it really was done.


But what I am seeing is the half life of the latest ones is better with a few isotopes showing some stability relative to the other elements nearby on the Periodic Table.


Well, they have been creating these elements for a while that break down instantly. They transition, basically they are particles that exist but only in very unique instances for very short times. The only thing I can see these elements being useful for is to create weapons or increasing the output of weapons. We do not need more weapons.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 11:08 AM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
I can't quite get my head around solid Hydrogen. So that's what's inside a gas giant


Or a giant diamond




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