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Strange New State of Hydrogen Created

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posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:01 PM
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This is pretty cool, ATS.



Phase V hydrogen, created by crushing Earth's lightest element with mind-boggling pressures, gives the physicists a glimpse of the inner atmosphere of a gas giant, where pressures reach millions of (Earth) atmospheres


Scientists have created what's called 'Phase V Hydrogen' by applying intense pressure to the Hydrogen atom. After applying intense pressure(s) in a lab, scientists were able to create this new phase of Hydrogen which apparently happens before the Liquid Metal Hydrogen phase; a phase that is still theorized since it hasn't officially confirmed. There is speculation that the center of Jupiter has this Metallic Hydrogen at the core of Jupiter where pressures reach 29million psi, it's speculated that Hydrogen turns into Liquid Metal. Of these altered states when there is pressure applied in the amount of 47million psi, Hydrogen becomes solid.




Crushing hydrogen
At the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, doctoral student Philip Dalladay-Simpson and his colleagues Ross Howie and Eugene Gregoryanz put a small amount of hydrogen between two diamond anvils, and dialed up the pressure to 384 gigapascals, or 55 million pounds per square inch (psi). By comparison, Earth's atmosphere is 100 kilopascals, or 15 pounds per square inch, at sea level. On Jupiter, the weight of the atmosphere hits 29 million psi at about 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers) below the cloud tops, and models suggest that's where hydrogen may take the form of a liquid metal.
In this case, when the pressure hit the 325-gigapascal mark, or 47 million psi, the hydrogen became a solid, with the atoms forming layers that alternated between orderly and jumbled arrangements. This is the first time anyone has seen this form of the element at close to room temperature (about 300 degrees Kelvin, or about 80 degrees Fahrenheit), the scientists said.


SOLID HYDROGEN? That's off the charts! This is way cool, ATS. Even though Jupiter doesn't have the PSI to make Hydrogen solid, this Liquid Metal thing is something that's pretty exciting to consider. Personally, I think Jupiter has solid ground or at least a solid core because it's features don't really change. But what do I know? I'm not a scientist. What says ATS?


www.scientificamerican.com...




posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:21 PM
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I can't quite get my head around solid Hydrogen. So that's what's inside a gas giant



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I heard about this earlier. Definitely very cool.

I agree with you about Jupiter. Maybe all gas giants are like this. But,like you, I'm not an astronomer nor astrophysicist



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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What is really impressive is that they manage to observe hydrogen when it is squished between two diamonds at 55 million PSI.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
I can't quite get my head around solid Hydrogen. So that's what's inside a gas giant


That's what I though at first but upon further reading, I see that Jupiter doesn't have solid ground according to the article: they say that Hydrogen becomes solid at 47mil psi but Jupiter is only 29mil psi.
edit on 9-1-2016 by lostbook because: word change



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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I've always wondered how the shoemaker comet pelted Jupiter leaving large explosions on the planets surface. Maybe the comet was hitting a metal core.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

The comets were most likely crushed to dust by the pressure before they ever made it to the center.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 09:42 PM
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They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.


Good point, Ricky Mouse. This new form of Hydrogen is predicted to exist on large Gas planets where the right conditions are present. So, man isn't creating it out of thin air, but just creating this on Earth where it doesn't exist, yet.
edit on 9-1-2016 by lostbook because: word change



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

"Phage" calling out to "Phage!" This is right up your alley.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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I'm curious if you could harvest this solid hydrogen, would it stay solid once you remove it from Jupiter or is it only the pressure that is keeping it in its solid state ?

I'm guessing it's similar to Earth metals and heat, providing there's enough heat they stay in their liquid form but remove the heat and they return to solid, but in this case on Jupiter the "heat" is pressure ?



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: rickymouse
They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.


Good point, Ricky Mouse. This new form of Hydrogen is predicted to exist on large Gas planets where the right conditions are present. So, man isn't creating it out of thin air, but just creating this on Earth where it doesn't exist, yet.


Now, they have recently added four new elements to the periodic table and those elements may not actually exist in the universe. Those they may have actually created, but they may exist under the right conditions somewhere but don't last long, breaking down almost instantly. I didn't look that up myself, my daughter told me about it so I am not sure if it really was done.



posted on Jan, 9 2016 @ 10:39 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: rickymouse
They did not create the new type of hydrogen, it supposedly already exists on Saturn and Jupiter. I think this is what they are talking to. They were able to form it by being able to reproduce the conditions necessary, that is far from creating it. Just the wrong word was being used. I do not create water from ice if I warm it.


Good point, Ricky Mouse. This new form of Hydrogen is predicted to exist on large Gas planets where the right conditions are present. So, man isn't creating it out of thin air, but just creating this on Earth where it doesn't exist, yet.


Now, they have recently added four new elements to the periodic table and those elements may not actually exist in the universe. Those they may have actually created, but they may exist under the right conditions somewhere but don't last long, breaking down almost instantly. I didn't look that up myself, my daughter told me about it so I am not sure if it really was done.


Yes, I'm curious as to what this will all lead to in 20yrs.



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 12:53 AM
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An interesting question for you all.

Skip the physics of how to create it.

01. Would a solid hydrogen balloon filled with hydrogen gas float?

02. Which would be heavier a solid hydrogen balloon or a lead balloon?


edit on 10-1-2016 by acrux because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 01:02 AM
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originally posted by: acrux
An interesting question for you all.

Skip the physics of how to create it.

01. Would a solid hydrogen balloon filled with hydrogen gas float?

02. Which would be heavier a solid hydrogen balloon or a lead balloon?



Don't know. All I know is that the concept of Solid Hydrogen is just so kick-ass!
edit on 10-1-2016 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 01:07 AM
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I wonder if this is plausible with other gases, eg. Solid metal oxygen/helium etc.

Any physicists out there know if it is even theoretical?






edit on 10-1-2016 by acrux because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 03:59 AM
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a reply to: acrux

My guess is: yes and no

If it is immersed in even more dense material, it would float, and sink in less dense material...

I could be wrong, but isn't that how it works?

It's not like Hydrogen is anti gravity, is it?
Hydrogen is just earthinaturally (my newly made up word) less dense (or lighter?) than what it's "floating" in, as far as I understand...

For example, when you've got tanks of air or oxygen, if it's compressed enough, underwater divers can still descend, right? But if you take that air and release it from the pressurized tanks into balloons, it can raise heavy stuff from the bottom of the ocean... (I hope I'm conveying what I'm thinking correctly.)

Cool thought, though.
edit on 1/10/2016 by japhrimu because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/10/2016 by japhrimu because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 04:24 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
I've always wondered how the shoemaker comet pelted Jupiter leaving large explosions on the planets surface. Maybe the comet was hitting a metal core.


If anything comes in at 25,000 to 40,000 mph and hit even a thin gas layer, it's going to heat up rather rapidly. That will cause frozen gas and most solids to vaporize, disintegrating it.



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 05:14 AM
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Interesting cold fusion link from Harvard, how long have they been doing this?

adsabs.harvard.edu...

Probably could be used as a micro fusion reaction starter but then you have an uncontrolled reaction till the fuel is gone.



posted on Jan, 10 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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I wonder what happens when you exert this pressure when hydrogen is near a super fluid state (near absolute zero) just like helium. That would be very interesting to see.



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