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Is something wrong with the moon?

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posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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The moon is 1/4 the earth's diameter. Therefore viewing the earth from the moon, the earth would appear about 4x as large as the moon appears from earth. So look up in the night sky, look at the moon, and visualize it all blue and marble-y and four times as big. It would still be pretty small. The illusion of discrepancy is indeed a function of lens perspective.









posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: OuttaHere

Excellent examples. Well-reasoned response. I'd star you twice if I could.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

NOTIFICATION SENT



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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Pucture of Earth taken by japans kaguya orbiter. Its no different to Apollo pictures.


edit on 8-1-2016 by glend because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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originally posted by: glend
Pucture of Earth taken by japans kaguya orbiter. Its no different to Apollo pictures.

Everytime I see photos of the earth from space, I just get chills. To think we're down here, squabbling over petty things like which imaginary magical sky daddy has the biggest biceps, while we're hurtling through the interplanetary medium at thousands of kilometers per hour around what's basically a fantastically large thermonuclear explosion that is so massive it's own gravity keeps it from exploding fully. And even then, our star is fairly puny compared to many others out there, some of which could hold all of the inner planets and MORE inside itself.

And here we are, arguing over what color a dress is.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: DenyObfuscation
a reply to: Helious


Take a look at the video and ask yourself if something is wrong with the moon.

I don't see it. What is wrong? This isn't a games forum so speak up.

ETA: The pics from the Moon used a camera. The pics from EPIC are using a telescope.


Thanks, for saving me the bother.

For the OP, perfectly natural perspectives, transfer that to you looking at the Moon...somewhat. Better still, what do you think you would visually see a million miles out?
Apollo 8,



files.abovetopsecret.com...

Apollo 11,



files.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 8-1-2016 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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I remember this photo coming out and thinking the same thing. For about 30 seconds, then decided it was a lens or perspective illusion happening.
Here is a very scientific experiment. Hold your arm out and make a fist, pick an object like your television and place your fist in front of it from the couch, then pull your fist to your eye and experience the magic as the fist covers the whole area of the tv.
Boom, your fist is bigger than that 70" tv.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: ScientificRailgun

originally posted by: glend
Pucture of Earth taken by japans kaguya orbiter. Its no different to Apollo pictures.

Everytime I see photos of the earth from space, I just get chills. To think we're down here, squabbling over petty things like which imaginary magical sky daddy has the biggest biceps, while we're hurtling through the interplanetary medium at thousands of kilometers per hour around what's basically a fantastically large thermonuclear explosion that is so massive it's own gravity keeps it from exploding fully. And even then, our star is fairly puny compared to many others out there, some of which could hold all of the inner planets and MORE inside itself.

And here we are, arguing over what color a dress is.


Yes its magnificence is beyond belief. Now that absolute greed is failing society, it will hopefully be replaced by absolute curiosity, resulting in furthering our knowledge of the cosmos.

I love your mind ScientificRailgun.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: glend

originally posted by: ScientificRailgun

originally posted by: glend
Pucture of Earth taken by japans kaguya orbiter. Its no different to Apollo pictures.

Everytime I see photos of the earth from space, I just get chills. To think we're down here, squabbling over petty things like which imaginary magical sky daddy has the biggest biceps, while we're hurtling through the interplanetary medium at thousands of kilometers per hour around what's basically a fantastically large thermonuclear explosion that is so massive it's own gravity keeps it from exploding fully. And even then, our star is fairly puny compared to many others out there, some of which could hold all of the inner planets and MORE inside itself.

And here we are, arguing over what color a dress is.


Yes its magnificence is beyond belief. Now that absolute greed is failing society, it will hopefully be replaced by absolute curiosity, resulting in furthering our knowledge of the cosmos.

I love your mind ScientificRailgun.
Too many people lack perspective. On the cosmic scale we're less than a speck of dust yet we fight over the most trivial things instead of stretching our wings and sailing off in the unknown. We're all fighting and killing over who controls a tiny fraction of a microscopic marble of rock in the vastness of space.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

"Too many people lack perspective"

And the reason for that is ego. Many see themselves as more important than the entire universe itself. But that unbridled greed is failing, the worlds economic system, now beyond repair. So a new world is coming, regardless if they (the greedy) like it or not. To quote Arundhati Roy, if you listen carefully, you can hear her coming.

If engineers can come up with a new type of propulsion that can send probes to nearby stars it will grab the curiosity of all. We as a people will realize our true size in the cosmos.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: glend

It's fine. I believe we'll live to see the singularity in our lifetime. Once that happens, I think we'll be exploring the stars little more than 50 years after that.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: Helious

The diameter of Earth is 12,742 km.
The diameter of the moon is 3,474 km.

So the moon is about 1/4 of the size of the Earth....which I think is represented well in the images...
I see no problem here.

A2D



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 05:06 PM
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originally posted by: Helious

originally posted by: scraedtosleep
I understand perspective and camera lens sizes. I believe we went to the moon .

My question is this. Where are all the satellites in the epic images?


The EPIC satellite is at the L1 position roughly 1 Million miles from Earth.

And that is the answer to your own question. When photographing the Earth and the Moon from 1 million miles away using a telescope, the Earth will not look the same it would look from the Moon.

Here's the Earth and the Moon to scale (both relative size and distance):


Naturally, the Moon appears quite small in our sky, and even the Earth appears somewhat bigger from the Moon, but not gigantic. That's because there's 384,480 km between them. Considering the sizes of Earth and the Moon, that's a lot.

However, when looking at them through a telescope from 1 million miles away, that distance becomes less significant, and both Earth and the Moon appear according to their sizes relative to each other.

~~~

But the long and short of it is, the video's author (and you too) don't understand how different focal length works. Which is surprising, because people use it all the time when zooming in and out on their cameras, or using different lenses with a DSLR.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 05:17 PM
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originally posted by: Helious

originally posted by: DenyObfuscation
a reply to: Helious


Take a look at the video and ask yourself if something is wrong with the moon.

I don't see it. What is wrong? This isn't a games forum so speak up.

ETA: The pics from the Moon used a camera. The pics from EPIC are using a telescope.


The point is this, the video from EPIC is a true representation of the actual size of the Earth and the Moon. One being a camera and one being a telescope is not at issue, what is at issue is the size of the Earth as compared to the Moon.

The fact that the apollo astronauts were using a regular camera IS the issue. The moon is actually very tiny in wide angle pictures taken with camera lenses on earth, earth is comparatively large in images of it within the Apollo images archive. People like you often over-estimate how large the moon appears in our sky because it looks large on the horizon (which is an illusion). It's only half a degree wide, and as mentioned the earth is only two degrees wide from the moon. That's not much if you're using a lens with a width of field between 38 and 71 degrees wide.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: ScientificRailgun
a reply to: glend

It's fine. I believe we'll live to see the singularity in our lifetime. Once that happens, I think we'll be exploring the stars little more than 50 years after that.


Singularity doesn't appeal to me for a number of reasons. I think string theory might be on a better track but even Edward Witten has admitted it will take hundreds of years to really work out the wrinkles in string theory. The large hadron collider might prove the existence of extra dimensions that string theory predicts in the not too distant future.

For propulsion we need something that can gain positive traction against space-time itself. Perhaps the EmDrive is a precursor to such an engine, who knows.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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I found this image to be a balance of perspectives and ... omg...



That's no moon!


edit on 8-1-2016 by Volund because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: Helious

This video shows how the moon earth can have different sizes depending on perspective, and its a moonlanding sceptic that debunks his own theory by making a simple experiment.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thank you, your post has helped me understand what I was missing when I seen this. I believe I "get it" now.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: Helious
a reply to: butcherguy

I don't think I can chalk this one up to perspective. I thought about it pretty hard and honestly it not only seems implausible, it seems downright impossible that at that scale the Earth would appear so tiny from the surface of the moon.

I mean, granted, I'm not an astrophysicist but I don't think you have to be to see the glaring inconsistency between the Apollo photos and the EPIC video.

Field of fecking view. Jesus H.

Look, I am of the opinion that a lot of the early Apollo photos were fake for publicity purpose. Not even a professional photographer without the handicap of gloves and fixed focal length can take that many perfect images one after another. Possible : yes, likely : you have got to be freaking kidding! But please don't use the obvious ignorance of photography as a defense of a conspiracy otherwise you detract from more obvious anomalies in the narrative.

FYI I have a member of my family (definite access to the info) who stated (when drunk) the US did land on the moon...but it was a one way trip.......curious alternate take..... However it explains why NASA does not want anyone near the sites.



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 08:58 PM
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originally posted by: Iamnotadoctor
That Dark sky watcher guy is a known hoaxer, drug addict, all round douche.
Such white trash.



Why drag race into it? Are you a racist? People on this forum don't care for racist.



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