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Broadchurch (UK) - a Cultural Competency Must-Watch

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posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: woodwardjnr

I always thought "me duck" was a north Nottinghamshire/Yorkshire thing?

I am not too far from Oxford now but have not heard that since I moved down here?



"me duck" or "my duck" is definitely Oxfordshire thing too.




posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI


You mean that you're not conscious of having one. I used to be quite proud of not having the accent of my place of origin, which includes pronouncing the word "go" as "goo".
Near the border, right?

My mother's family come from Rob-Roy territory.

Balquhidder

I visited there. Also went to Stirling, climbed William Wallace's memorial. Have also visited Glenfinnan (bogs are deep!) and Doune (Scotland), where Monty Python and the Holy Grail's castle sits......

Went to Mallaig, and Fort William, Edinborough and Glasgow - had flown into Manchester, stopped off the train at Penrith and toured the lakes district........
it was lovely.

Thanks for your help, cousins!

edit on 1/7/2016 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: blupblup

Ok, so - "my petal" - is that a local or regional thing?



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: woodwardjnr

I always thought "me duck" was a north Nottinghamshire/Yorkshire thing?

I am not too far from Oxford now but have not heard that since I moved down here?


It's definitely an older person thing in Oxfordshire. I say it occasionally



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
See, that's the thing. I know Fawlty Towers was filmed in Torquay, right? (Cornwall?)

But - The Englishman is supposedly in Wales/SW England.......

Neither of those do the "f" for "th" thing except for a couple of hotel guests......

And .. The Englishman Who Went up a Hill and Came Down a Mountain
of course.....near to Cardiff (which is a place someone in Broadchurch mentioned)....

and - Brassed Off. But, that was in Yorkshire, right?

If you all could help me identify what region of the UK they came from, that would be awesome! (Grand!) (Ta!)



You do know Cardiff is the capital of Wales? You know, that place that is always used as a comparison when we are told about the destruction of this beautiful world; like an area of forest, the size of Wales, was lost to deforestation in the last few months.

But Hugh Grant is t..t..terribly English.



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
" which includes pronouncing the word "go" as "goo"." Near the border, right?

No, this was the Isle of Ely Fens, in the east of England.
Within sight of Ely Cathedral (the only thing that stands above the horizon for miles around).



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Cobaltic1978


You do know Cardiff is the capital of Wales?

Yes. Familiar with Wales.....
have blood from there, too (running in my veins)....hence I bring up "The Englishman".
Other ancestors were from Essex (Saffron-Walden) and London (Islington).



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs I have definitely inherited parts of my parents northern accent only certain words and phrases, but then we all have turning into our parents to look forward to. If you want to hear an Essex accent, you should watch the only way is Essex or TOWIE for short. Awful jersey shore type of programme


edit on 7-1-2016 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

The Fens! Okay, sure! I know about the Fens. Glad you mentioned it. The lowland swamps....drained at one point by King Charles' contractors, I believe? There abouts? King James??

I know I've studied it, but getting kerfuffled in the "file drawer" of my mind.....




edit on 1/7/2016 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Quite right. Dead flat, fields separated by ditches (we called them dykes) instead of hedges or fences, villages all founded on the low hills which used to be islands. Rivers re-engineered to run in straight lines, sometimes higher than the level of the surrounding fields. Main crop sugar-beet- huge things, much larger than beetroot.


edit on 7-1-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

I'm talking about the few guests who did speak like that - the undercover cop following the conman (for example - you know, when the Lord and Lady were expected.....bricks in the briefcase.....).


edit on 1/7/2016 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Quite right. Dead flat, fields separated by ditches (we called them dykes) instead of hedges or fences, villages all founded on the low hills which used to be islands. Rivers re-engineered to run in straight lines, sometimes higher than the level of the surrounding fields. Main crop sugar-beet- huge things, much larger than beetroot.



I had the misfortune of growing up near a massive sugarbeet refinery in Newark.

The smell was horrific.



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
You mean that you're not conscious of having one. I used to be quite proud of not having the accent of my place of origin, which includes pronouncing the word "go" as "goo".


I used to think that I did not have an accent as I was dragged around the world as a child of the British Army. It''s a bit "posh".

Having lived in the West Country (topic if the OP) for the last 30 years I have developed a "roll" in some of my pronunciations. I am certainly proud that my kids have dialect that gives them a "place and belonging!".

My wife is a Geordie ("had a whey an #e man" = pardon!). When I met her I didn't have a clue what she was talking about. Nothing's changed.



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Isn't it horrible?

My brother lives in Montana, and there's a huge Sugar-Beet plant there. We were "privileged" to be given a private tour by a worker there - even went up on the roof to watch a truck dump its load ---- the sluices, the dripping ceilings, the grime EVERYWHERE - the stench!!!!

Ack.

Yeah, we wore rubber boots and safety glasses. Wasn't until the very end that we got to the "high-tech" stuff ........

I couldn't even go INTO the one room that smelled like lethal cat-piss...........

the lye treatment chamber?



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs
I would have to go back to the episode and listen again.
I have Devon relatives (maternal side) with very broad accents, but I don't remember anything as broad as that. The production team may have thought that local accents would be a distraction.



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:11 PM
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If you like Broadchurch try watching Prime Suspect and also have a look at Luther.

Guaranteed you'll love them .



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

LOVE that show. My husband and I just marathon-watched it. It's what I call 'intelligent' drama. Keeps you guessing. Nicely paced. Subplots and tangents but no wasted time. The only drawback for me, as an American from the south, is some of the accents are difficult to understand to my ears.

I've decided that, except for a couple of exceptions, I much prefer British TV series to American. American TV is ridiculously
dumbed down and trite. Exceptions include such winners as "Parks and Recreation" and "The West Wing." Those are truly the bomb! The first, 'intelligent comedy' and the latter, 'intelligent drama.'

But British TV... I've almost never been disappointed. At least the ones I've found on Netflix. Here's a great comedy/drama if you haven't already found it: "Last Tango in Halifax"

So cheers to you across the pond!



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: new_here


LOVE that show. My husband and I just marathon-watched it.

That's what I'm doing now! Season 2 Episode 1......


It's what I call 'intelligent' drama. Keeps you guessing. Nicely paced. Subplots and tangents but no wasted time. The only drawback for me, as an American from the south, is some of the accents are difficult to understand to my ears.

I use closed captions. It helps SO MUCH to begin to understand other accents!!


I've decided that, except for a couple of exceptions, I much prefer British TV series to American. American TV is ridiculously
dumbed down and trite.

Yep.


Exceptions include such winners as "Parks and Recreation" and "The West Wing." Those are truly the bomb! The first, 'intelligent comedy' and the latter, 'intelligent drama.'


Right? Those were the two that got me into 'serial-watching' stuff.....Parks and Rec, and The West Wing,....and also "The Office."

Try "Parenthood", too! And "Damage." For intellectual stuff....

I know exactly what you mean!!!! **hug**

edit on 1/7/2016 by BuzzyWigs because: bleh, typos galore



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs




It bugs me how people with obviously local (less-educated?) accents are often interviewed.....and many times they are also overweight and missing teeth....


I second that!!! I'm from South Carolina, and believe you me, if there is an on-the-scene interview, it's with the most embarrassing representative of humanity possible, pink curlers and all. Grammar not included.



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: neformore


Prime Suspect and also have a look at Luther.


Okay! I'll look them up!! I have a copy of a british movie called "Luther" - but, is there a series? Is that on Netflix?



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