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Major Roman settlement in Spain discovered:

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posted on Jan, 4 2016 @ 03:23 AM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
a reply to: Spider879
Nice post Spider,

I might remind everbody that before there were celto-iberians, or phonecians in Iberia, Agean people had settled there, looking for metals.


It is one of the most heavily mineralized places on earth with an abundant supply of the prestige metals of gold and silver as well as copper and tin that is still being mined to this day.




This is what was so annoying about the BBC programme that I mentioned in my previous post. The places where copper and tin were found in close proximity to each other are the primary nodes of Western European trade, and colonialism. Spain up to, and beyond, Roman expansionism, has been seriously underestimated by mainstream history, but economic history often is, or at least it is dealt with as a specialised subject, which does all of us a disservice. In terms of understanding the transistional development from "public goods" and community commons to personal ownership and enclosure, as well as the fundamental role that religion takes in administering and supporting those systems it provides the missing links, it answers the vast majority of hows and whys once incorporated.

Nice link, thanks




posted on Jan, 5 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

I suspect Aegean Sea - peoples may have been in large part Phoenician since they occupied that area in the earliest times; certainly Crete.

On the Development of World Power Structures - Part I



posted on Jan, 5 2016 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: nOraKat
a reply to: punkinworks10

I suspect Aegean Sea - peoples may have been in large part Phoenician since they occupied that area in the earliest times; certainly Crete.

On the Development of World Power Structures - Part I
Its the opposite, the phonecians were an outgrowth from the fall of the Minoan trade empire, after the loss of thera. The sites of the phonecian cities were originally Minoan/Akkadian trade ports.



posted on Jan, 6 2016 @ 07:01 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

I am no expert but I suspect the entire region spawned from the earliest Sumerian/Mesopotamian fertile crescent civilizations. All of these cultures/civilizations we mention date back to early Bronze age (3300 BC) or earlier. If Sumerian are the earliest of these civilizations, then development spread from east to west. The Phoenicians seemed to be credited as the first to develop the big hulled boats engaged in distant trade, coining, and written language.



posted on Jan, 6 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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originally posted by: nOraKat
a reply to: punkinworks10

I am no expert but I suspect the entire region spawned from the earliest Sumerian/Mesopotamian fertile crescent civilizations. All of these cultures/civilizations we mention date back to early Bronze age (3300 BC) or earlier. If Sumerian are the earliest of these civilizations, then development spread from east to west. The Phoenicians seemed to be credited as the first to develop the big hulled boats engaged in distant trade, coining, and written language.

Hi nOraKat I would be mindful of claiming Sumerians as first for anything, its safer to say parallel development,
The first organized state that we know of so far is Ta-Seti a state in what was later known as Nubia going back 3300 B.C with proto writing, coinage was pretty recent appearing in China 11th cent B.C , India 8th cent B.C and Greece about the same time, Long distance ocean trading was being conducted by Dravidians at quite an early date.
edit on 6-1-2016 by Spider879 because: clarification



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