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Artifact Found Near Lufkin, TX - Need Help Identifying

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posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: TXTriker



The elixir container is different than in this movie.... but what popped in my head was that it was an elixir bottle, like "snake oil", with an image of Ponce de León who is known for seeking the fountain of youth... did he find it? Buy this little bottle and find out! I live in Polk county btw and that looked very familiar. Local snake oil salesman selling youth from after the civil war is my best guess. (it was almost like I immediately recognised it).




posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: Volund
What a good idea! Perfect bottle for a snake oil salesman pushing elixir from the Fountain of Youth. I hope it's true!



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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Having only the picture and not being able to see any manufacture marks on the bottom, I'd have to join the "snake oil" vessel chorus. My guess would be from the middle of the 19th century or later. If it was found 1905 it certainly is an antique but its value depends on how many people can identify it and have a desire to own it. From the molding marks, my guess is that it was of commercial manufacture.
Any archaeology program that has an historical department should be able to identify it. Have you tried a match search on Google?



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 11:35 PM
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originally posted by: TXTriker
Just a note, I did not find it. It was supposedly found in the 1900s and we've since found it was near Kennard, TX. Someone who has it now put it on facebook and it trickled down to my husband's page. Just trying to assist in identification and because it is pretty cool looking.


That fits with it being an earthenware (which is a fired clay) Art Deco piece. Kennard's pretty small and always has been. I'd guess it was a house decoration (possibly a souvenir or a trinket/gift.) It's not a medicine bottle... those were glass.


Just in case, does anyone know if the Spanish spent any time in the area? Kennard is east of Crockett TX located in a national forest. This is deep East Texas. It is about halfway between Crockett and Lufkin.

Yes and no. It and Texas were part of Mexico at one time, if you recall. However, it's not something a conquistador or military man would carry around. This is a fancy thing that someone would keep in a house (or possibly a store.)



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: TXTriker

Is the top open as it looks or does it look like it was corked?

One thought, look up Spanish conquistador powder flask.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 02:00 AM
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Medicine bottle....or...a booze bottle ? But doesn't look big enough...so I'm leaning towards medicine bottle .



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 03:01 AM
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a reply to: Byrd
Since it was found in 1905, I hardly see how it can be Art Deco. Art Deco came out of France just prior to WWI, becoming popular in the US in the 1920s.
It appears to be terra cotta, unglazed but with a bit of guilding remaining around the top of the vessel, so I would agree that it is probably decorative rather than functional.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 03:13 AM
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a reply to: TXTriker

Cheap, mass-produced in a factory, mid to late nineteenth century. Sorry.


edit on 2/1/16 by Astyanax because: of second thoughts.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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several interesting replies. I particularly like the snake oil idea....



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 06:38 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: TXTriker
Just a note, I did not find it. It was supposedly found in the 1900s and we've since found it was near Kennard, TX. Someone who has it now put it on facebook and it trickled down to my husband's page. Just trying to assist in identification and because it is pretty cool looking.


That fits with it being an earthenware (which is a fired clay) Art Deco piece. Kennard's pretty small and always has been. I'd guess it was a house decoration (possibly a souvenir or a trinket/gift.) It's not a medicine bottle... those were glass.


Just in case, does anyone know if the Spanish spent any time in the area? Kennard is east of Crockett TX located in a national forest. This is deep East Texas. It is about halfway between Crockett and Lufkin.

Yes and no. It and Texas were part of Mexico at one time, if you recall. However, it's not something a conquistador or military man would carry around. This is a fancy thing that someone would keep in a house (or possibly a store.)



The Spanish conquistadors first came in 1519. Spain was one of the five countries that claimed this as part of their land.

"The recorded history of Texas begins with the arrival of the first Spanish conquistadors in the region known as Texas in 1519.

"During the period from 1519 to 1848, all or parts of Texas were claimed by five countries: France, Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas and the United States of America."

en.wikipedia.org...

So, there were Spanish conquistadors here in Texas. Sounds like this pottery find could be authentic.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 09:26 AM
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Will try to respond to all in this post. We did a google image search and nothing came up. No response from the original poster yet. We have sent a copy of the picture to the Houston Archaeology Society.

Don't expect to hear from anyone until after the weekend/holiday. We received a suggestion of an anointing oil container.

We don't really care about its value because it isn't ours. We are just as curious as the original poster and are trying to identify it.

Fountain of Youth snake oil sounds pretty good to me too.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 09:31 AM
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its an obvious hoax, love the way that you stated "It was supposedly found in the 1900s", supposedly, someone else you don't know told you that...

it has no history, no provenance and looks like it came rom a dollhouse
Its never been shown to a museum, in what, 115 years

when is it going to be re-excavated in the treasure pit ?



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 09:35 AM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: TXTriker

Is the top open as it looks or does it look like it was corked?

One thought, look up Spanish conquistador powder flask.


Don't know if it is open. So far this is the only picture but we've asked for more and more info.

Looked up the powder flask. While none shown match, it is a distinct possibility that it could be a priming flask. The size seems to be comparable but hard to say from the pictures shown.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl

So, there were Spanish conquistadors here in Texas. Sounds like this pottery find could be authentic.



Yes, there were conquistadors here, and yes this is authentic... to the 1800's or early 1900's.

Conquistadors didn't take earthenware pottery on their travels (too fragile and too heavy.) The grape leaf and grapes motif is more common in art deco - and specifically it appears to be a fairly modern terracotta.

I've seen things like this before (my reason for suggesting that it's modern and a trinket.) It's not very similar to the museum pieces from the time of the Conquistadors but the quality of the terracotta and the lack of colored glazes is very similar to pieces produced in the US in the late 1800's and onward.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: TXTriker

While I have no inkling as to the providence of the artifact in question, I do know that the Spanish were criss-crossing East Texas for close to 200 years before the War for Independence. There were missions and trade routes through out the area. If this were something from the time period, it is conceivable that it fell off one of the many "steamer" that rolled through the area. I would suggest contacting the Witte Museum or Brisco Museum of Western Art. Both are located in San Antonio, Texas and are well versed in artifacts through out the state and northern Mexico.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 11:15 AM
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looks like a Martian rock




posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

It looks to be terra cotta but it is only 2 1/2 inches tall.



I wonder if there's a hole in the bottom. The reason I ask is because it looks like an ornate top to a flagpole, or something like that. It certainly looks like it fits on the top of something.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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I agree that the notion of "victorian" might not quite fit....but the fleur's and leafs you see would be right at home in classical period, and especially renaissance or baroque.

That aside, Lufkin is also the home/place of invention of one of my favorite candies:




posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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Your stated location of the "find" is approx 7 miles from Texas hwy 21. Hwy 21 follows the old Spanish El Camino Real or "King's Highway" through East Texas and down to San Antonio. Just my two cents.



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
I agree that the notion of "victorian" might not quite fit....but the fleur's and leafs you see would be right at home in classical period, and especially renaissance or baroque.

That aside, Lufkin is also the home/place of invention of one of my favorite candies:



I just found out these were made in Lufkin! Great stuff.



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