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Lunar Leap: Europe Eyes Establishment of Moon Base by 2030s

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posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:23 PM
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So, Europe is ramping up its Space efforts with calls for the establishment of a MoonBase starting in the 2020's with human and robot missions to set things up. The European Space Agency (ESA) hosted the two-day symposium, called "Moon 2020-2030 - A New Era of Coordinated Human and Robotic Exploration," on Dec. 15 at the European Space Research and Technology Center in Noordwijk, Netherlands. The goal is to seek successful ways to make the return to the Moon a successful international endeavor.



There is growing interest in Europe to prioritize the moon as humanity's next deep-space destination.

The moon, supporters say, can serve as a springboard to push the human exploration of the solar system, with Mars as the horizon goal. So Europe is ratcheting up what it sees as the strategic significance of the moon by pushing forward on lunar-exploration missions that would involve both humans and robots.

Calling the effort a "comeback to the moon," European space planners envision a series of human missions to the lunar vicinity starting in the early 2020s. Those missions, according to the plan, will include coordination between astronauts and robotic systems on the lunar surface. Robots would land first, paving the way for human explorers to set foot on the moon later.


Russia calls for setting up a Moon base, the Us is looking at Mars, and now Europe is looking to set up a Moon base also. I'd say that the Space race is the new gold rush. After years of empty Space infrastructure, it looks like something is finally about to kick off. Exciting times! What says ATS?

www.nbcnews.com...




posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:45 PM
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uh, I don`t think they can do that because the aliens already told us not to return to the moon



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:49 PM
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Maybe our fearless leaders smoothed things over with the ETs and a few complimentary probings later we are allowed to pass go.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:52 PM
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originally posted by: Tardacus
uh, I don`t think they can do that because the aliens already told us not to return to the moon


Source?



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:52 PM
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Russia announced the most recent in a series of cuts to its space program in early December. Their program will be operating on a total of the equivalent of $22.5 billion US over the next ten years, roughly $2.25 billion a year. NASA, in contrast, had a budget of $18 billion in 2015, and will receive $19.3 billion in 2016.

Russia will be lucky to keep their legacy vehicles - like Soyuz and Progress, upon which the ISS relies (for now) - operating, bring the Angara launch vehicle into full production, and complete already planned launches (like the MLM station module. It is difficult to imagine them being a serious partner in a major project like a moon base in this budget environment, and that's leaving aside the recent political issues between Russian and the west.

As for bright spots, NASA getting a larger budget in 2016 over 2015 is a definite plus. The mammoth SLS launcher remains on-track (though I think it might end up being a bit of a white elephant), and NASA should announce the winners of the 2nd commercial cargo delivery contract, CRS-2, sometime in January. SpaceX and Boeing should both make progress towards testing their manned crew capsules.

In addition to all of that, if SpaceX can demonstrate reliable landing and affordable reuse of the Falcon 9 first stage booster, it could be a real move towards making space travel much more affordable.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: PhloydPhan

SpaceX's reusable rocket is a real game changer.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: lostbook


I'll believe it when I see it. All of humanity should be working on a Mars colony. When we reach 10 billion people on Earth, the proverbial crap will hit the fan.
This is my estimate as to what the Earth can handle. Think about this. Insects outnumber us by the billions. But they are beneficial and leave no sign behind. As for us....well. That is another story.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Good god, can we please go back to the moon?!



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Gonna be quite the surprise when they see bases already on the moon.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 11:54 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: lostbook

Good god, can we please go back to the moon?!


I think that NASA is passing the torch of LEO and the Moon to private industry while they focus on farther destinations...Mars, Asteroids, etc..



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

source is the aliens , go back and see if we can stay there if we can`t then the source is real, if we can`t then I wouldn't want to the guys that give a try.

since I`m not one of the guys that`s going to try to establish a moon base, I say give it a try,it`s not my ass that's on the line.



edit on 1-1-2016 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:00 AM
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Value for buck, nothing can beat robotic missions, but if they agree to build a supper massive telescope on the far side of the moon I will wave their flag.



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:00 AM
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Sounds great!



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:44 AM
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.
edit on 1-1-2016 by MajorAce because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 03:18 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I'm cautiously optimistic about SpaceX's prospects. Getting back the first stage was a huge accomplishment, and the only reports we have about the status of that stage - including this one by Elon Musk, which claims that the stage suffered, quote, "no damage" and is "ready to fire" - have been positive. That said, they don't have a reusable booster until they actually reuse a booster. Hopefully, that happens this year.

If the first stage boosters can be reliably recovered, and if they can be turned around quickly and without intense maintenance, it will be a real shock to the launch industry. I'd expect ULA to either advance their plans for the Vulcan , a partially-reusable vehicle in which only the first stage engines are reused or ditch those plans for something totally reusable.

It will also be enough to give Europe pause; it took a lot of negotiation in 2015 to agree on a design for the Ariane 6 launch vehicle; if SpaceX can pull off booster reusability, the Europeans will have to either redesign the rocket or commit to building spending 2.4 billion Euros on a rocket that will still cost perhaps twice as much as SpaceX's rocket.

I really hope that 2016 is the year that space launch gets the affordability shake-up it needs to make returning to the moon and going to Mars something that is really achievable in the near term.




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